Ad from the first issue of Kuokoa, 1861.

NALO MELI [Bee]

SHOP

of

HALEWAI.

JOHN THOMAS WATERHOUSE’S

At this store, there are many items for men, women, and children; new goods from California.

CAMEL

Those who make purchases from this store will see the

CAMEL

at no cost.

Always flying is the Flag of the

HAWAIIAN NATION

at the entrace of this

STORE.

[Notice how “Halewai” [lit., water house] is what they called John Thomas Waterhouse. Later for Waterhouse you will also see Walakahausi and Walakahauki.

The images to the left and right of “Nalo Meli” are of a bee hive with bees flying above it.

OH, and yes, it seems there was a camel…]

(Kuokoa, 10/1861, p. 3)

HALE KUAI.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke I, Helu 1, Aoao 3. Okatoba, 1861.

Hawaiianized names and sample ballot, 1892.

[It would be very helpful if there was some sort of great listing of Hawaiianized names readily available, because often times unless you just know, or are lucky enough to have another reference, you will not know who is being spoken about or even sometimes how to pronounce the name. Notice in this sample ballot:]

Henry Waterhouse, Walakahauki

J. N. S. Williams, Wiliama

Paul Neumann, Paulo Numana

A. Marques, Makuika

John Ross, Kapena Loke

J. A. Cummins, Keoni Kamaki

E. B. Thomas, Kamaki

John Ena, Keoni Ina

James Gay, Kimo Ke

A. P. Peterson, Aka Pikekona

[What it is even trickier is when there are multiple names for the same person. For instance, Waterhouse is “Walakahauki,” “Walakahausi,” “Halewai,”…]

(Daily Bulletin, 2/1/1892, p. 2)

HOW TO VOTE.

The Daily Bulletin, Volume III, Number 334, Page 2. February 1, 1892.