The beginning of the “Pineapple Island,” 1922.

LANAI SOLD FOR A MILLION DOLLARS.

Last week Monday, it was confirmed that Lanai was purchased by Hawaiian Pineapple Company [Hui Halakahiki Hawaii] for the price of a million dollars.

The two owners of the island, except for a remainder of but a thousand acres, are Frank F. Baldwin and H. A. Baldwin, giving them ownership of about 130 square miles.

Included in this purchase was the land, animals, and the buildings of Lanai Ranch [hui hanai holoholona o Lanai].

The main purpose for buying the island of Lanai was to plant pineapple, but for the time being, the company will explore planting pineapple in Waialua, and within three or four years from now, they will think about planting pineapple on Lanai; but for now, ranching will continue on the island.

Before Lanai becomes a pineapple island, one of the things that the pineapple company must think about first is the building of a proper pier, and at the same time, to do test plantings of pineapple at different places to see how the pineapple grows or does not grow.

(Kuokoa, November 23, 1922, p. 3)

LILO O LANAI NO HOOKAHI MILIONA DALA.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXI, Helu 47, Aoao 3. Novemaba 23, 1922.

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Hawaiian Pine purchases Lanai, 1922.

LANAI GOES TO THE HAWAIIAN PINEAPPLE COMPANY

Last Tuesday the deal went through for Hawaiian Pineapple Company to purchase the land, the animals, and all equipment of Frank F. Baldwin and Harry A. Baldwin upon the Island of Lanai.

After paying the agreed price of $1,100,000, the retention of the old head managers and the members of the board of supervisors [papa alakai] of the Lanai Company, Ltd., of each of their positions was approved.

All of the rights of the Lanai Company has accrued to the Hawaiian Pineapple Company, and a number of new leaders have been chosen for that company, those being: James D. Dole, president; Kenneth B. Barnes, secretary; R. S. West, treasurer.

The entirety of Lanai is owned by the Lanai Co., Ltd, except for 1,000 acres, some kuleana lands, and all animals, cows, sheep, structures and other equipment of the ranch.

The new company will continue ranching, however, according to what is clearly understood, it will begin to plant pineapple on approximately 20,000 acres of chosen land, when the time is right.

The first thing planned by the Hawaiian Pine Company is to farm on land bought in Waialua this year while put aside the lands on Lanai until the right time comes to farm there. What it must do prior to farming pineapple is to build a pier, roads, and housing for the laborers, and if that happens, then pineapple from that island will hit the market in 1927.

(Kuokoa, 12/7/1922, p. 1)

LILO O LANAI I KA HAWAIIAN PINEAPPLE COMPANY

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXI, Helu 49, Aoao 1. Dekemaba 7, 1922.