The Constellation lands, 1843.

AMERICAN MAN OF WAR.

On the past 5th of July, the American Man of War named Uluhoku (Constellation), Commodore Kearny is its captain. Continue reading

“Kearny cloak” aboard the Malolo, 1927.

[Found under: “Nuhou Kuwaho”]

By way of the steamship Malolo which arrived this past Monday, returned was the feather cape of Kamehameha I that was presented to Captain Kearny of the armed forces of America, and which was obtained through purchase by Robert P. Lewis.

(Kuokoa, 11/24/1927, p. 4)

Ma ka mokuahi Malolo...

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXVI, Helu 52, Aoao 4. Novemaba 24, 1927.

The “Kearny Cloak” at Tiffany & Co., 1893.

THE WAR CLOAK OF KAMEHAMEHA I.

AN INTERESTING HAWAIIAN RELIC TO BE SEEN IN THIS CITY.

The recent proposed annexation of the Sandwich Islands has revived much forgotten lore concerning the people of Hawaii and their history, and nothing perhaps is more interesting than specimens of the handiwork of this semi-barbarous people who possessed certain arts for ingenuity and patient labor that cannot be equalled by the boasted civilization of the nineteenth century. In Tiffany & Co.’s window, in Union Square, there is on exhibition for a few days a feather war cloak or namo, once the property of Hawaii’s giant King, Kamehameha I (The Lonely One), which tradition says cost the labor of several generations of skilled workers. The body consists of a fine network of homespun cord, make from the native hemp or olona, the meshes of which vary from an eight to a thirty-second of an inch; over this is laid the feather-work in small bunches of three or four feathers each, tied with a minute thread highly twisted, made from the same fibre. The cloak is almost semicircular in shape, and cut to fit in at the neck. The meshwork being made in sections of various shapes, allows it, when placed on a tall man’s shoulders, to fall in graceful lines about his body. Continue reading

Warships, 1843.

SIX MEN-OF-WAR

There are six men-of-war [manuwa] docked in Honolulu, on this day, the 4th of August. Three of them are from Britain, and three are from America.

Here are the names of the British ships. (1.) Dublin, a frigate; Rear Admiral R. Thomas is the officer. The ships has 50 cannons.

(2.) Carysfort is a small frigate; its captain is Lord George Paulet; this ship has 26 cannons.

(3.) Hazard is a Sloop; Bell is the captain, and it has 16 cannons.

These are the names of the American ships.

(1.) United States is a frigate; Commodore Jones is the officer. The ship has 52 cannons.

(2.) Constellation is a frigate; Commodore Kearney is the officer; it has 46 cannons.

(3.) Cyane is a Sloop; its captain is C. K. Stribling; it has 20 cannons.

(Nonanona, 8/8/1843, p. 29)

EONO MOKU MANUWA.

Ka Nonanona, Buke 3, Pepa 6, Aoao 29. Augate 8, 1843.

Restoration Celebration at Luakaha, in Nuuanu, 1843.

FEAST OF THE KING.

Here is the food that M. Kekuanaoaʻs overseers [konohiki] contributed for the feast of the King upland of Nuuanu at Luakaha on the 3rd of August.

Mahuka, 2 pigs, 3 chickens, 53 coconuts. Maalaiki, 1 chicken. Hanakauluna, 2 chicken. Kanana, 1 chicken. Nui, 1 pig, 1 basket of sweet potato. Kumupala, 1 pig, 1 chicken, 5 sweet potato, 5 taro. Kauwai, 1 chicken. Nalapauwahiole, 2 chicken, 6 taro. Kaluahinenui, 1 lau [400] fish, 36 coconuts. Mu, 1 pig. Kanoa, 37 coconuts. Makahopu, 1 chicken. Nailimai, 1 chicken. Nahalelauhala, 2 chicken. Puuloa, 1 chicken. Kalalawalu, 1 pig. Kaohe, 1 chicken. Kaleimakalii, 1 chicken. Kepu, 2 chicken. Kinopu, 1 pig. Hueu, 2 chicken. Napohaku, 1 chicken. Kaaua, 2 pigs, 1 chicken, 1 turkey, 2 ducks, 120 fish. Koiamai, 1 chicken. Nalino, 2 chicken. Kamaukoli, 1 pig, 4 poi, 120 fish. Paele, 1 chicken, 5 baskets of sweet potato [kiki uala], 10 taro. Kahakuailii, 1 chicken. Kaaipuna, 1 chicken, 1 duck. Polikua, 2 pigs. Kikaha, 1 pig. Kekoaalohiu, 1 pig. Kaiwi, 1 chicken. Kaniho, 1 pig, 2 poi. Kawahinelawaia, 1 chicken. Kahanamoku, 1 pig. Kapoo, 1 chicken. Kaluhia, 3 chicken. Makahuluhulu, 1 chicken. Keliikumoku, 1 poi. Kokahi, 1 pig. Honaunau, 1 pig, 55 taro.

Here is the food that Kamehameha’s very own konohiki contributed for his feast.

Wiliama, T. 1 pig, 2 poi, 8 fish, 1 chicken. G. P. Judd, 2 pig, 7 poi, 8 fish. Kanoa, 1 pig. Huakini, 1 pig. Wahahee, 1 pig, 6 taro. Kekai, 1 poi, 50 fish. Kanaina, 1 pig. Kalama, 1 pig, 1 chicken, 6 taro, 1 poi, 1 basket of sweet potato. Namakeha, 1 chicken, 1 poi. Keohokalole, 2 pig, 27 coconuts. Kalaimoku, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Kaaoao, 1 poi. Kalunaaina, 1 pig, 1 poi. Kamakahonu, 30 fish. Namauu, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Piikoi, 2 poi, 1 duck, 1 pig, 10 fish. Papa, 4 sweet potato. Kealakai, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Nakoa, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Kaeo, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Kailiwai, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Kelama, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Kanewili, 1 poi. Kapu, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Koa, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Kahoe, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Lahilahi, 1 pig, 1 poi. Haole, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Ulunui, 4 fish. Ulualoha, 1 pig. Kale, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Hinau, 1 poi. Makole, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Kuaana, 2 poi, 20 fish. He 60 fish. Kuke, 1 pig, 1 poi. Punahele, 1 poi, 10 fish. Alapai, 1 pig. Kala, 1 poi, 1 pig. Kahaaualii, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Kamokuholohewa, 1 poi. Kekuaiwahia, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Puhalahua, 1 pig, 1 chicken. Ioane Ii, 2 pig, 1 chicken, 2 turkey. Kanina, 1 pig. Kaawahua, 1 poi, grapes. Maalahia, 1 poi, grapes. Kaapuiki, 1 chicken. Kaihiwa, 1 pig. Keaniani, 1 pig. Kaaha, 1 pig. Kaunuohua, 300 lemons.

Those were the konohiki who contributed to the king’s celebratory feast, and there were many konohiki of the King and M. Kekuanaoa who did not contribute to this celebratory feast of the king for the return of the land to him. And these konohiki who did not contribute, are without aloha, and without joy for the return of the nation to our king.

At perhaps 11 o’clock was when the King went up with his men in their …

(Nonanona, 8/5/1843, p. 28)

AHAAINA A KE LII.

Ka Nonanona, Buke 3, Pepa 6, Aoao 28. Augate 8, 1843.

glory; and the haole of the warships, in their best; and the musicians. And when they reached the uplands and entered into the grass house [hale pili], that was when the celebration began with music.

When the food was ready on the table spread over with greenery, it was 32 feet long and 2 feet wide. And the amount of food placed on this table was: 60 pigs, 300 chicken, 40 turkeys, 58 ducks. With all the supplies necessary to prepare this food; Kamamalu 1 set of supplies [? ukana], Lota 1 ukana; Liholiho 1 ukana; Mose 1 ukana; Lunalilo 1 ukana.

The number of servants was over forty per ukana. There were 250 plates, 250 knives, 250 forks, 250 bowls, 250 cups, 150 spoons. And the number of those who ate were probably over 250; there were two prominent haole: Commodore Kearny from the American man-of-war, and the head of the United States warships in East India. Ana Admiral R. Thomas of the British warship, the head of the British warships in the Pacific.

There were four flags raised above the troops while the feast went on: one British flag, one American flag, one French flag, and one Hawaiian flag; and the king’s standard stood near to where the king was.

When the  feast was over, most on foot went back; all together the men, women, and children totaled 2000 or perhaps more. The number of horses were 270, and the riding on the horses on the return was by fours, with two flags and the musicians, while from their mouths came hip hip hurrah [hipi hipi hulo] with great joy all the way until Haliimaile. Written by I. H. Paehewa, Secretary

The Fort. August 5, 1843.

[Anyone know how “ukana” is being used here? Calabash?]

(Nonanona, 8/8/1843, p. 29)

"...kou hanohano..."

Ka Nonanona, Buke 3, Pepa 6, Aoao 29. Augate 5, 1843.

Images of the return of Kamehameha III’s ahuula, 1927.

This is a picture showing scenes of the Feather cape of Kamehameha. The picture on the top is the return of the ahuula from the archives to within the Palace. The picture below is the ahuula draped upon the throne.

(Kuokoa, 12/1/1927, p. 1)

He kii keia e hoikeike ana...

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXVI, Helu 53, Aoao 1. Dekemaba 1, 1927.