Visit to Ahuimanu College and impressions of Joseph Mokuohai Poepoe, 1873.

Ahuimanu College.

During our vacation, our pleasant diversion was a visit to the other side of the island to attend the examination of the Catholic Seminary, known as Ahuimanu College. The trip to that point takes us over celebrated Pali, the pass and precipice which afford such a noble view of the lovely landscape on the northeaster side of the island. We went in state to the Pali with a four in hand, driven by mine host of our Hotel, who is as good a whip as he is a caterer. We partook of a dejeuner upon a knoll which overlooks the enchanting view; and then descended on foot the steep stairway of the mountain. The slope would not be so very difficult if the constant winds driving through this gorge of the mountain did not compel, sometimes, gentlemen to hold on to their hats, and ladies to hats and skirts, with both hands. The cavern of the winds seems situated hereabout, and Eolus and Boreas try to crack their cheeks in blowing on every passer-by. At the foot of the Pali we found friend Doiron awaiting us with a good vehicle and a stout horse, and having also the assistance of two boys on horseback, who attached their lariats to the shafts of our buggy, to help over the hills, away we went, a merry company of six in a trap made to carry four, and at noon on the third instant we arrived at the lovely retreat of Ahuimanu.

Father Lieven, the Principal, a stout hearty gentleman, of about forty years of age, gave us a welcome; which was heightened by meeting his coadjutor Father McGinniss, a genial son of the Isle of Faith. In the course of the day, the Venerable Bishop Monseigneur Maigret, accompanied by Father Aubert of Lahaina, arrived; and subsequently we had the honor to meet for the first time Father Damien, our hero who has devoted his life to the lepers. And soon, with this intelligent, cultivated and chatty company of Reverends, we found ourselves very pleasantly at home.

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The National Anthem by William Charles Lunalilo, 1862.

E ola ka Moi i ke Akua.

Hakuia e WM. C. LUNALILO.

Ke Akua mana mau,
Hoomaikai, pomaikai
I ka Moi!
Kou lima mana mau,
Malama, kiai mai,
Ko makou nei Moi
E ola e!

Ka inoa Kamahao,
Lei nani o makou,
E ola e!
Ko Eheu uhi mai,
Pale na ino e,
Ka makou pule nou
E ola e!

Haliu, maliu mai,
Nana mai luna mai
Kau Pokii nei;
E mau kou ola nei,
Ke Akua kou kiai
Ka Pua nani e
Hawaii e!

Imua Ou makou,
Ke ‘Lii o na ‘Lii,
E aloha mai;
E mau ke Ea nei
O keia Aupuni,
E ola mau lakou,
Ia oe no.

Ianuari 4, 1862.

[The winning lyrics by Lunalilo to a contest open to native Hawaiians to compose a song praising Kamehameha IV, Queen Emma, and Ka Haku o Hawaii, sung to the tune of “God Save the King”.]

(Kuokoa, 2/8/1862, p. 1)

Kuokoa_2_8_1862_1

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke I, Helu 11, Aoao 1. Feberuari 8, 1862.

Follow up to Hawaiian National Hymn, 1862.

[Found under: “NEWS OF HAWAII NEI.”]

Good Will.—We are always delighted to release to the public all kind deeds done for the benefit of the people, and therefore, we are showing at once the great kindness of the Honorable, Chief William C. Lunalilo, in his donating the ten dollars he received for composing the National song that was published in our Issue 11, to aid the Queen’s Hospital.

(Kuokoa, 2/15/1862, p. 2)

Lokomaikai.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke I, Helu 12, Aoao 2. Feberuari 15, 1862.

More on the Hawaiian National Hymn, 1874.

Hawaiian National Hymn.

William Charles Lunalilo, whose death we briefly announced in our last issue, was descended from the highest of the Royal line of Hawaiian Chiefs. His mother was Kekauluohi, known as Kaahumanu III., Kuhina Nui (Premier) under Kamehameha III., and was married to Charles Kanaina, from which marriage two sons were born Davida and William. The former died when quite young. William, soon after his mother’s death, when about eight years of age, was placed in the Royal School, kept by Mr. and Mrs. Cooke, where he received a liberal English education, and as he possessed naturally, a quick mind, he became one of the best scholars in the school. For English classical literature he had great fondness, and his familiarity with the English poets was remarkable. It was this taste that led him to indulge in writing poetry, some of which was well composed. On one occasion, twelve years ago, he called on us in our editorial sanctum and sat down at our table. In the course of the conversation, we suggested that he become a competitor for the best prize which had been offered for the best Hawaiian version of “God Save the King.” He took a pen and in fifteen or twenty minutes handed us his verses, which we enclosed in an envelope and passed with ten or twelve others to the judges, who awarded it the prize, and this is known now as the Hawaiian National Hymn “God Save the King.” We instance this to illustrate the extraordinary mental qualities with which he was endowed.—Gazette, Feb. 11.

E Ola ka Moi i ke Akua.

HAKUIA E KA MEA KIEKIE WILLIAM C. LUNALILO.

1. Ke Akua mana mau,
Hoomaikai, pomaikai
I ka Moi!
Kou lima mana mau,
Malama, kiai mai
Ko makou nei Moi,
E ola e!

2. Ka inoa kamahao
Lei nani o makou,
E ola e!
Kou eheu uhi mai,
Pale na ino e,
Ka makou pule nou,
E ola e!

3. Imua ou makou,
Ke ‘Lii o na Alii,
E aloha mai;
E mau ke ea e
O ke aupuni nei,
E ola mau makou,
Me ka Moi.

God Save the King.

TRANSLATED BY REV. L. LYONS.

1. Eternal, mighty God,
Bless, from thy bright abode,
Our Sovereign King;
May thy all-powerful arm
Ward from our Sire all harm,
Let no vile foe alarm,
Long may he reign!

2. Royal, distinguished name,
Our beauteous diadem,
Long life be thine;
Thy wing spread o’er our land.
From every wrong defend,
For thee our prayers ascend,
Long live our King!

3. Before thee, King of Kings,
Of whom all nature sings,
Our prayer we bring;
Oh, let our kingdom live,
Life, peace and union give,
Let all thy care receive;
Bless thou our King!

(Friend, 3/2/1874, p. 24)

Hawaiian National Hymn.

The Friend, New Series, Volume 23, Number 3, Page 24. March 2, 1874.