Mary Kealohapauole Timoteo passes away, 1908.

MRS. TIMOTEO.

MRS. MARY KEALOHAPAUOLE TIMOTEO.

This estimable lady, wife of Rev. E. S. Timoteo, traveling evangelist of the Hawaiian Board, having received a stroke of paralysis, breathed her last on the 6th of September, being then 56 years of age.

Mrs. Timoteo was born at Puakea, Kohala, island of Hawaii, August 9th, 1852. In her girl-hood she attended the government or common school of her native village, then taught in the Hawaiian language.

At 15 years of age, she entered the Waialua Boarding School for Girls, known as Haleiwa, which was taught by Mr. and Mrs. O. H. Gulick, and which had an enrollment of 100 girls, 80 of whom were at one time under their roof.

Returning to her home she was married to Rev. E. S. Timoteo in 1871. With her husband they entered the Training School of the North Pacific, then under the guidance of Rev. B. W. Parker, and later taught by Rev. and Mrs. Dr. C. M. Hyde. In 1880 Mr. Timoteo accepted a call to the pastorate of the Waialua Hawaiian Church [Liliuokalani Protestant Church]; which position he filled, most creditably, for about 18 years. In 1897 Mr. Timoteo was called to the pastorate of the Kaumakapili Church in Honolulu.

In August, 1901, he was called by the Evangelical Association of the Islands, to be a traveling evangelist, and since then his wife has accompanied him upon many of his circuits doing a most helpful work in aid of her husband’s mission of reconciliation and reclamation of disaffected and backsliden Churches and Church members.

Mrs. Timoteo has always been a worthy and true helpmeet for her husband, setting a bright example to the women of every race, and every station. She was mindful of the advice of the Apostle Peter to wives, “Whose adorning let it be the hidden man of the heart, in that which is not corruptible, even the ornament of a meek and quiet spirit, which is in the sight of God of great price.”

O. H. G.

[This publication, The Friend, is word-searchable, and can be found on the Mission Houses Museum website here.]

(Friend, 10/1908, p. 16)

MRS. MARY KEALOHAPAUOLE TIMOTEO.

The Friend, Volume LXV, Number 10, Page 16. October, 1908.

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Nawahi paints Hilo Town, 1868.

[Found under: “NU HOU KULOKO.”—”Oahu.”]

Painting of the Hilo Town.—We saw the beautiful painting of the town of Hilo of the Kanilehua rain, in the drug store of G. P. Judd [G. P. Kauka] here in Honolulu. The painting was painted by a Hawaiian boy, named Joseph K. Nawahi [Iosepa K. Nawahi], and he used his brush with detail in all the intricacies the painting. When you see it, it is so beautiful, and admiration for that Hawaiian painter wells in the hearts of all who sees it. This youth was not intensely educated in great art schools, but while he attended Lahainaluna Seminary, he was trained in that skill, drawing and painting, and his expertise in that exceptional discipline of the haole is clear for the first time. His name will become famous through his paintings.

[We all have heard about the awesome story of the 1888 painting by Nawahi of Hilo Town which was featured on Antique Roadshow, now displayed up on the campus of Kamehameha Schools, but the painting described here seems to be the one in the care of the Mission Houses Museum!

Check out this story about two more Nawahi paintings. The whereabouts of these two painting are not known (at least publicly) today… I really want to see the one with the Hiiaka sisters!]

(Kuokoa, 10/31/1868, p. 3)

Ke Kii o ke Kulanakauhale o Hilo.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke VII, Helu 44, Aoao 3. Okatoba 31, 1868.

Temperance Advocate and Seamen’s Friend, 1843–1954.

The Friend

Rev. Samuel Chenery Damon was sent by the American Seamen’s Friend Society to be chaplain in Honolulu. The Damons sailed from New York March 10, 1842 aboard the Victoria, Captain Spring, and arrived in Honolulu October 19, 1842. He was the pastor of the Bethel Union Church, Seamen’s Chapel for 42 years and was the publisher and editor of the periodical The Friend from 1843 — 1885, when he retired.

The first issue was published in Jan. 1843, originally under the name Temperance Advocate, then as Temperance Advocate and Seamen’s Friend, with the Advocate and Friend being published as an extra, then as The Friend of Temperance and Seamen, with The Friend as an extra, and finally simply as The Friend, beginning January 1, 1845.

From 1885 through 1887, it was co-edited by the Revs. Cruzan and Oggel. The editorship then passed to Rev. Sereno Bishop, who held the post until the publication of the paper fell under the auspices of the Board of the Hawaiian Evangelical Association in April of 1902 where it remained until June 1954. Since then, it has continued in a different format under the Hawaii Conference-United Church of Christ up to the present day, making it the oldest existing newspaper in the Pacific.

The Friend began as a monthly newspaper for seamen, which included news from both American and English newspapers, and gradually expanded to adding announcements of upcoming events, reprints of sermons, poetry, local news, editorials, ship arrivals and departures and a listing of marriages and deaths. Rev. Damon published between a half million and a million copies of The Friend, most of which he personally distributed.

Because of its longevity, The Friend is an excellent resource for scholars of nineteenth-century Hawaiian history.

This collection contains 1,396 issues comprising 21,030 pages and 50,904 articles.

Missionary Album, 1969.

MISSIONARY ALBUM

Portraits and Biographical Sketches of the
American Protestant Missionaries
to the Hawaiian Islands

Enlarged from the Edition of 1937

Sesquicentennial Edition
Published by the
Hawaiian Mission Children’s Society

1969

Honolulu, Hawaii

[This is a great reference if you are looking for information on Protestant missionaries to Hawaii nei. It was put out by the Mission Children’s Society. Unfortunately, it seem that the list of missionaries to Micronesia and the Marquesas was left out of the publication to make room for the index.

I am not sure if it still available for purchase at the Mission Houses, because I cannot find it online, as they seem to be doing an overhaul of their gift shop portion of their online site, which can be found here.

And don’t forget that this is a useful list when researching missionaries!]

(Missionary Album, 1969.)

Missionary Album, 1969.

Missionary Album, 1969.

More on the Hawaiian National Hymn, 1874.

Hawaiian National Hymn.

William Charles Lunalilo, whose death we briefly announced in our last issue, was descended from the highest of the Royal line of Hawaiian Chiefs. His mother was Kekauluohi, known as Kaahumanu III., Kuhina Nui (Premier) under Kamehameha III., and was married to Charles Kanaina, from which marriage two sons were born Davida and William. The former died when quite young. William, soon after his mother’s death, when about eight years of age, was placed in the Royal School, kept by Mr. and Mrs. Cooke, where he received a liberal English education, and as he possessed naturally, a quick mind, he became one of the best scholars in the school. For English classical literature he had great fondness, and his familiarity with the English poets was remarkable. It was this taste that led him to indulge in writing poetry, some of which was well composed. On one occasion, twelve years ago, he called on us in our editorial sanctum and sat down at our table. In the course of the conversation, we suggested that he become a competitor for the best prize which had been offered for the best Hawaiian version of “God Save the King.” He took a pen and in fifteen or twenty minutes handed us his verses, which we enclosed in an envelope and passed with ten or twelve others to the judges, who awarded it the prize, and this is known now as the Hawaiian National Hymn “God Save the King.” We instance this to illustrate the extraordinary mental qualities with which he was endowed.—Gazette, Feb. 11.

E Ola ka Moi i ke Akua.

HAKUIA E KA MEA KIEKIE WILLIAM C. LUNALILO.

1. Ke Akua mana mau,
Hoomaikai, pomaikai
I ka Moi!
Kou lima mana mau,
Malama, kiai mai
Ko makou nei Moi,
E ola e!

2. Ka inoa kamahao
Lei nani o makou,
E ola e!
Kou eheu uhi mai,
Pale na ino e,
Ka makou pule nou,
E ola e!

3. Imua ou makou,
Ke ‘Lii o na Alii,
E aloha mai;
E mau ke ea e
O ke aupuni nei,
E ola mau makou,
Me ka Moi.

God Save the King.

TRANSLATED BY REV. L. LYONS.

1. Eternal, mighty God,
Bless, from thy bright abode,
Our Sovereign King;
May thy all-powerful arm
Ward from our Sire all harm,
Let no vile foe alarm,
Long may he reign!

2. Royal, distinguished name,
Our beauteous diadem,
Long life be thine;
Thy wing spread o’er our land.
From every wrong defend,
For thee our prayers ascend,
Long live our King!

3. Before thee, King of Kings,
Of whom all nature sings,
Our prayer we bring;
Oh, let our kingdom live,
Life, peace and union give,
Let all thy care receive;
Bless thou our King!

(Friend, 3/2/1874, p. 24)

Hawaiian National Hymn.

The Friend, New Series, Volume 23, Number 3, Page 24. March 2, 1874.

Mahalo to Elinor Langer for her comment on trial of participants of the January 6, 1895 Counter Revolution. 1895.

Elinor Langer says:

And it was on January 17, 1895, the second anniversary, that the Republic opened the trials of the people arrested for “treason” in the revolt. Has anyone seen accounts in the Hawaiian papers about what happened on January 24, the day the Queen signed her forced abdication statement? According to “The Friend” (February 1, 1895) “On the 24th, while engaged in the trial of a company of natives, the Court was startled by the fall upon the table around which they sat of a massive bar of plaster from the lofty ceiling [of the Throne Room, where the trials were taking place.] The bar was nine feet long, forming part of a decorative panel. It fell upon the center of the table, precisely fitting the length of it. Col. Whiting had a narrow escape, his face being grazed, although protected by his military hat. The plaster had been loosened by a sharp shake of earthquake the night before.” The Queen signed the statement at 11 a.m. in the rooms directly above –perhaps even at the same time?

[See the original article, “The Story of the Insurrection” in The Friend, Volume 53, Number 2, Pages 9–11. February 1895.

Comment to Writing on the wall, 1894.]