Kanaina estate auction, 1882.

AUCTION OF THE ESTATE EXECUTOR.

The Estate Executor of the deceased C. Kanaina will be put up for auction at Aliiolani Hale, when 12 noon arrives of

Wednesday, July 26, 1882

these items:

1 oil raincoat [kapa uweke]
1 painted portrait of Lunalilo
1 painted portrait of Lunalilo as a child
1 drawing of the Duke of Genoa
1 gold watch
1 ahuula

W. C. Parke
Executor of C. Kanaina

July 11, 1882.

(Ko Hawaii Pae Aina, 7/15/1882, p. 2)

KHPA_7_15_1882_2

Ko Hawaii Pae Aina, Buke V, Helu 28, Aoao 2. Iulai 15, 1882.

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Estate sale of Charles Kanaina, 1882.

[Found under: “NEWS OF THE WEEK.”]

At the sale of the effects of some of the late Charles Kanaina, the feather cloak was purchased by the Government for $1,200. Her Majesty Queen Dowager Emma was a competitor for this cloak, the actual money value of which, if calculated on the basis of cost, it would be difficult to estimate. This cloak belonged to Kalaimamahu, the father of Kekauluohi, who was the wife of Kanaina and mother of the late King Lunalilo. Two portraits, one of Lunalilo and the other of Kekauluohi, were also bought by the Government for $100 each. That of Lunalilo was painted by Norwegian artist, named Jurgensen. The painter of the toher is not known.

(Pacific Commercial Advertiser, 7/29/1882, p. 3)

PCA_7_29_1882_3

The Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume XXVII, Number 5, Page 3. July 29, 1882.

The marriage of Kauikeaouli to Kalama Kapakuhaili, 1837.

MARRIAGE OF THE KING.

Honolulu, Feb. 2, 1837.

KAUIKEAOULI the King of the Hawaiian archipelago and KALAMA, the daughter of Naihekukui was wed by Mr. Bingham [Binamu].

At the stone house of Kekauluohi and Kanaina, the aunty and uncle [makua] of that girl, is where their marriage took place, and the wedding reception of the Alii, and the singing of the marriage hymn. After that, they went to pray at the church that night at the great assembly. “Marriage is honourable in all.” And this marriage is greatly respected by their true friends.

Long live the King!

May his kingdom have great peace.

(Kumu Hawaii, 2/1/1837, p. 72)

KA MARE ANA O KE LII.

Ke Kumu Hawaii, Buke 2, Pepa 18, Aoao 72. Feberuari 1, 1837.

Escaped coconut crab, 1877.

[Found under: “NA ANOAI.”]

Last we we were shown by Kalua, a coconut-eating crab, which he found in the yard of the Senior Alii C. Kanaina, in a deep hole dug into the earth. Its whole appearance is strange indeed. Its legs are huge, and its pincers are scary to look at, and its whole body is remarkable. Where did it come from? Continue reading

Kaleimamahu’s ahuula, 1882.

[Found under: “HAWAII NEWS”]

The feather cape of Kaleimamahu which was inherited by the queen, Hakaleleponi, and then to the alii father, C. Kanaina, was purchased at auction by the Government for $1,200.

[Anyone know what became of this ahuula?]

(Ko Hawaii Pae Aina, 8/5/1882, p. 3)

O ka ahuula o Kaleimamahu...

Ko Hawaii Pae Aina, Buke V, Helu 31, Aoao 3. Augate 5, 1882.

More on the Hawaiian National Hymn, 1874.

Hawaiian National Hymn.

William Charles Lunalilo, whose death we briefly announced in our last issue, was descended from the highest of the Royal line of Hawaiian Chiefs. His mother was Kekauluohi, known as Kaahumanu III., Kuhina Nui (Premier) under Kamehameha III., and was married to Charles Kanaina, from which marriage two sons were born Davida and William. The former died when quite young. William, soon after his mother’s death, when about eight years of age, was placed in the Royal School, kept by Mr. and Mrs. Cooke, where he received a liberal English education, and as he possessed naturally, a quick mind, he became one of the best scholars in the school. For English classical literature he had great fondness, and his familiarity with the English poets was remarkable. It was this taste that led him to indulge in writing poetry, some of which was well composed. On one occasion, twelve years ago, he called on us in our editorial sanctum and sat down at our table. In the course of the conversation, we suggested that he become a competitor for the best prize which had been offered for the best Hawaiian version of “God Save the King.” He took a pen and in fifteen or twenty minutes handed us his verses, which we enclosed in an envelope and passed with ten or twelve others to the judges, who awarded it the prize, and this is known now as the Hawaiian National Hymn “God Save the King.” We instance this to illustrate the extraordinary mental qualities with which he was endowed.—Gazette, Feb. 11.

E Ola ka Moi i ke Akua.

HAKUIA E KA MEA KIEKIE WILLIAM C. LUNALILO.

1. Ke Akua mana mau,
Hoomaikai, pomaikai
I ka Moi!
Kou lima mana mau,
Malama, kiai mai
Ko makou nei Moi,
E ola e!

2. Ka inoa kamahao
Lei nani o makou,
E ola e!
Kou eheu uhi mai,
Pale na ino e,
Ka makou pule nou,
E ola e!

3. Imua ou makou,
Ke ‘Lii o na Alii,
E aloha mai;
E mau ke ea e
O ke aupuni nei,
E ola mau makou,
Me ka Moi.

God Save the King.

TRANSLATED BY REV. L. LYONS.

1. Eternal, mighty God,
Bless, from thy bright abode,
Our Sovereign King;
May thy all-powerful arm
Ward from our Sire all harm,
Let no vile foe alarm,
Long may he reign!

2. Royal, distinguished name,
Our beauteous diadem,
Long life be thine;
Thy wing spread o’er our land.
From every wrong defend,
For thee our prayers ascend,
Long live our King!

3. Before thee, King of Kings,
Of whom all nature sings,
Our prayer we bring;
Oh, let our kingdom live,
Life, peace and union give,
Let all thy care receive;
Bless thou our King!

(Friend, 3/2/1874, p. 24)

Hawaiian National Hymn.

The Friend, New Series, Volume 23, Number 3, Page 24. March 2, 1874.