Estate sale of Charles Kanaina, 1882.

[Found under: “NEWS OF THE WEEK.”]

At the sale of the effects of some of the late Charles Kanaina, the feather cloak was purchased by the Government for $1,200. Her Majesty Queen Dowager Emma was a competitor for this cloak, the actual money value of which, if calculated on the basis of cost, it would be difficult to estimate. This cloak belonged to Kalaimamahu, the father of Kekauluohi, who was the wife of Kanaina and mother of the late King Lunalilo. Two portraits, one of Lunalilo and the other of Kekauluohi, were also bought by the Government for $100 each. That of Lunalilo was painted by Norwegian artist, named Jurgensen. The painter of the toher is not known.

(Pacific Commercial Advertiser, 7/29/1882, p. 3)

PCA_7_29_1882_3

The Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume XXVII, Number 5, Page 3. July 29, 1882.

Advertisements

A protest by the United States of America, 1843.

TO HIS MAJ. KAMEHAMEHA III, KING OF THE SAND. ISLANDS.

In the name and on behalf of the people of the United States of America and their Government, which the undersigned has the honor to represent, and in order to explain clearly for the information of all concerned, is issued, A PROTEST.

Whereas a provisional cession of the Hawaiian or Sandwich Islands was made by His Majesty Kamehameha III., King, and Kekauluohi Premier thereof, unto the Honorable George Paulet, Commanding Her Britannic Majesty’s Ship Carysfort, (to wit) on the twenty fifth day of February, eighteen hundred and forty three;—and whereas, the United States’ interests and those of their citizens resident in the aforesaid Hawaiian Islands are deeply involved in a seizure of His Majesty’s Government under the circumstances; as well as in the act of the aforesaid King and Premier acceding thereto under protest or otherwise, to affect the interests before cited: Now therefore be it known, that I solemnly Protest against every act and measure in the premises; and do Declare that from, and after the date of said cession until the termination of the pending negotiations between His Majesty’s envoys and the Government of Her Britannic Majesty, I hold His Majesty Kamehameha III., and Captain Lord George Paulet answerable for any and every act, by which a citizen of the United States, resident as aforesaid, shall be restrained in his just and undisputed rights and privileges, or who may suffer inconvenience or losses, or be forced to submit to any additional charges on imports or other revenue matters, or exactions in regard to the administration of any municipal laws whatever, enacted by the “Commission” consisting of His Majesty, King Kamehameha III., or his Deputy of the aforesaid Islands, and the Right Hon. Lord George Paulet, Duncan Forbes Mackay, Esq., and Lieut. Frere, R. N.

Given under my hand, on board the U. S. Ship Constellation, at anchor off Honolulu, Oahu, this eleventh day of July, eighteen hundred and forty three.

LAWRENCE KEARNEY, Commander in Chief of the U. S. Naval Force in the E. Indies.

(Nonanona, 7/25/1843, p. 21)

TO HIS MAJ. KAMEHAMEHA III., KING OF THE SAND. ISLANDS.

Ka Nonanona, Buke 3, Pepa 5, Aoao 21. Iulai 25, 1843.

Palapala hoole na Amerika Huipuia, 1843.

NA KAMEHAMEHA III., KE LII O KO HAWAII NEI PAE AINA.

Ma ka inoa, a ma ka aoao hoi o na kanaka o Amerika Huipuia a me ko lakou aupuni, (owau, ka mea i kakauia ka inoa malalo, he luna au no ia aupuni) a i mea hoi e hoakaka aku i na kanaka a pau i kuleana ma keia mea, ua hoopukaia’ku nei,

KEIA PALAPALA HOOLE.

No ka hoolilo ana o Kamehameha III, ke alii, a me Kekauluohi ke kuhina, i keia pae aina o Hawaii nei ia George Paulet, kapena o ka moku Beritania, Carysfort, ma ka la 25 o Feberuari, 1843; a no ka owiliia hoi o ka waiwai a me na hana a ko Amerika poe noho maanei, i loko o ia kaili ana o keia aupuni, a iloko hoi o ia hana a ke alii, a me ke kuhina, ma ia hoolilo ana, (me ka hoole paha, me ka ole paha)—

Nolaila, ke hoike aku nei au i keia: Ke hoole ikaika aku nei au i keia mau hana a pau.

Eia hoi ka’u e hai aku ai: Mai ka la ma i lilo ai keia aupuni a hiki i ka wa e pau ai ka hana pu ana a na luna o Kamehameha III, me ko Beritania aupuni, maluna o Kamehameha III, a me Kapena Haku George Paulet e kau ai ka hewa o kela hana, keia hana e poho ai ka pono akaka o ko Amerika poe e noho nei i keia pae aina. [O laua no ke hewa] ina paha e keakeaia ke kahi kanaka o Amerika Huipuia, a ina paha e poho ko lakou waiwai, a ina paha e koiia lakou e uku i dute hooi ma ka waiwai i laweia mai, a ma na mea e paha o ke aupuni, a ina paha e hooukuia lakou ma ka hooko ana i kekahi o na kanawai a pau i hanaia e “ka poe luna Beritania,” oia hoi ke alii, Kamehameha III, a o kona pani hakahaka paha, a me Haku George Paulet, a me Duncan Forbes Mackay Esquire, a me Lieutenant Frere, no ka manuwa Beritania.

Hanaia keia ma kuu lima maluna o ka moku manuwa o Amerika Huipuia, o Constellation ka inoa, a ke ku nei ia mawaho, ma Honolulu (Oahu.) i keia la umikumamakahi o Iulai, 1843.

LAWRENCE KEARNY, aliii nui maluna o na manuwa a pau o Amerika Huipuia ma Asia.

(Nonanona, 7/25/1843, p. 21)

NA KAMEHAMEHA III., KE LII O KO HAWAII NEI PAE AINA.

Ka Nonanona, Buke 3, Pepa 3, Aoao 21. Iulai 25, 1843.

More on the Hawaiian National Hymn, 1874.

Hawaiian National Hymn.

William Charles Lunalilo, whose death we briefly announced in our last issue, was descended from the highest of the Royal line of Hawaiian Chiefs. His mother was Kekauluohi, known as Kaahumanu III., Kuhina Nui (Premier) under Kamehameha III., and was married to Charles Kanaina, from which marriage two sons were born Davida and William. The former died when quite young. William, soon after his mother’s death, when about eight years of age, was placed in the Royal School, kept by Mr. and Mrs. Cooke, where he received a liberal English education, and as he possessed naturally, a quick mind, he became one of the best scholars in the school. For English classical literature he had great fondness, and his familiarity with the English poets was remarkable. It was this taste that led him to indulge in writing poetry, some of which was well composed. On one occasion, twelve years ago, he called on us in our editorial sanctum and sat down at our table. In the course of the conversation, we suggested that he become a competitor for the best prize which had been offered for the best Hawaiian version of “God Save the King.” He took a pen and in fifteen or twenty minutes handed us his verses, which we enclosed in an envelope and passed with ten or twelve others to the judges, who awarded it the prize, and this is known now as the Hawaiian National Hymn “God Save the King.” We instance this to illustrate the extraordinary mental qualities with which he was endowed.—Gazette, Feb. 11.

E Ola ka Moi i ke Akua.

HAKUIA E KA MEA KIEKIE WILLIAM C. LUNALILO.

1. Ke Akua mana mau,
Hoomaikai, pomaikai
I ka Moi!
Kou lima mana mau,
Malama, kiai mai
Ko makou nei Moi,
E ola e!

2. Ka inoa kamahao
Lei nani o makou,
E ola e!
Kou eheu uhi mai,
Pale na ino e,
Ka makou pule nou,
E ola e!

3. Imua ou makou,
Ke ‘Lii o na Alii,
E aloha mai;
E mau ke ea e
O ke aupuni nei,
E ola mau makou,
Me ka Moi.

God Save the King.

TRANSLATED BY REV. L. LYONS.

1. Eternal, mighty God,
Bless, from thy bright abode,
Our Sovereign King;
May thy all-powerful arm
Ward from our Sire all harm,
Let no vile foe alarm,
Long may he reign!

2. Royal, distinguished name,
Our beauteous diadem,
Long life be thine;
Thy wing spread o’er our land.
From every wrong defend,
For thee our prayers ascend,
Long live our King!

3. Before thee, King of Kings,
Of whom all nature sings,
Our prayer we bring;
Oh, let our kingdom live,
Life, peace and union give,
Let all thy care receive;
Bless thou our King!

(Friend, 3/2/1874, p. 24)

Hawaiian National Hymn.

The Friend, New Series, Volume 23, Number 3, Page 24. March 2, 1874.

Correspondences between Paulet and the Hawaiian Government. 1843.

ON THE LOSS OF THE KINGDOM.

Here are the documents illuminating how the Kingdom was lost to the Queen of Britain. The 25th of February was the day the cession was proclaimed.

[See on Google Books: British and Foreign State Papers, starting on page 1023. These correspondences were translated from English into Hawaiian, and from Hawaiian into English by Gerrit Parmele Judd (Kauka), the Secretary and Translator of the Kingdom.]

(Nonanona, 3/7/1843, pp. 97–100.)

NO KA LILO O KE AUPUNI.

Ka Nonanona, Buke 2, Pepa 20, Aoao 97. Maraki 7, 1843.

ke ai ka hoomalu ana...

Ka Nonanona, Buke 2, Pepa 20, Aoao 98. Maraki 7, 1843.

Honolulu, Oahu, Feb. 18, 1843.

Ka Nonanona, Buke 2, Pepa 20, Aoao 99. Maraki 7, 1843.

olelo maluna, aole hoi na kekahi kanaka...

Ka Nonanona, Buke 2, Pepa 20, Aoao 100. Maraki 7, 1843.