One more Christmas scene from Honolulu nei, 1910.

Flowers and Evergreen for Christmas—Honolulu Street Scene.

J. J. WILLIAMS

HONOLULU, H. I.

GAZETTE PHOTO ENG.

[I just realized now that this is a reused picture. It appears earlier in Kuokoa, 3/11/1904, p. 4! The reuse of stock photos is not unusual (even today)…]

(Hawaiian Gazette, 12/27/1910, p. 3)

Flowers and Evergreen for Christmas...

The Hawaiian Gazette, Volume LIII, Number 100, Page 3. December 27, 1910.

Farming in Hawaii, 1913.

ENCOURAGING SMALL FARMER.

Beginning January 5, The Advertiser will publish a weekly list of wholesale prices for Island produce in Honolulu markets while A. T. Longley, superintendent of the home markets division of the Hawaii Experiment Station will also supply a weekly market letter for publication. The marketing division was authorized by the last legislature, an appropriation having been made for the purpose.

Dr. E. V. Wilcox has been a close student of cooperative marketing organizations for the last twenty years. He stated to The Advertiser Saturday that there are ten times as many cooperative marketing organizations in the United States as in England and Germany combined, although there is very little American literature on the subject. One Southern farmer’s organization that both sells produce and purchases machinery, fertilizers, seed and supplies for its members includes over three million farmers and planters. California, Oregon, Idaho, Washington, Utah and Colorado have their fruit marketing organizations. In the Central States the farmers have to together on their corn, wheat and oat crops as well on the scores of minor products usually associated in the Hawaiian public mind with “small farming.” There are cooperative societies in New York and New England; in Kentucky, Tennessee and the Carolinas they united in the marketing of tobacco, early truck crops, peach and berry crops; and in the Gulf States they are almost a controlling factor in cotton.

The prime objects of farmer’s cooperative unions are, continuity of supply, an honest and uniform pack, and standardization of grades. The idea is to put the growing, packing and marketing of farm produce on a business basis.

Continue reading

Western medical school for Hawaiians, 1870.

Kahunas.

We understand that one of our physicians, who is thoroughly conversant with the native language, has been authorized to form a class of eight or ten Hawaiian young men, (graduates of the highest schools,) for instructions in the principles and practice of medicine.

There has never been made, that we are aware of, any systematic or earnest effort to instruct Hawaiian youth in the medical art. The knowledge that is necessary to be acquired to make a skillful and thoroughly competent practitioner is not to be obtained in this country, which as yet, does not possess medical schools and colleges, and the difficulties in the way of sending Hawaiian pupils abroad to obtain a medical education, are so various and insurmountable, as almost to preclude any hope of being overcome. Continue reading

Dr. G. P. Judd starts a medical school for Hawaiians, 1870.

Medical School.—In the English government newspaper [Hawaiian Gazette], we saw an editorial [manao pepa] pertaining to the establishing of a medical school for Hawaiian youths, perhaps eight or ten in number. After asking about, we were told that it is Dr. G. P. Judd who suggested the idea of starting that type of fine school of which we have faith that this proposed school will go well. Because these youths will be taught the haole medicine in the Hawaiian language by that elder doctor of ours, the one that is fluent in Hawaiian, and it is he in his knowledge of medicine who translated the Anatomy Book which is being taught in the high schools. Ten room are set up above the Residence of Dr. Stangenwald [Minuteole] for those ten students. We dearly hope that it goes well.

(Manawa, 11/21/1870, p. 2)

He Kula Kauka.

Ka Manawa, Buke I, Helu 3, Aoao 2. Novemaba 21, 1870.

Keoua Hale becomes Honolulu High School, 1895.

Honolulu High School [Kula Kiekie o Honolulu].

The illustration above is of the beautiful house of Princess R. Keelikolani, standing in Honolulu, and called Keoua Hale. It is said that when many drawings of houses were placed before the alii for her to choose from, she looked through the many and chose the drawing of this house and instructed the artist, “build me a house like that.” Therefore, a house like the one in the picture was constructed to completion which now stands proudly, the building which graces that portion of Honolulu on Emma Street on the land of Kaakopua. Continue reading

Response from the Pacific Commercial Advertiser, 1884.

The Gazette, always our neighbor, sometimes our friend, has very generously called attention to our enterprise in giving the “Alta Hoax” to the public just one hour after the arrival of the Alameda. We are truly grateful for some small favors, and in returns for the italicized notice of our friendly neighbor, we will give due publicity to the following,  clipped from its columns, with our illustrations bracketed between:

“TRUE CRITICISM.

“The following definition of ‘true criticism’ is clipped from one of our exchanges and is given herewith for the benefit of the writer of the editorials in the Gazette:

“Criticism differs from defamation in the following particulars:

“!. Criticism deals with such things as invite public attention, or call for public comment.”

(“That the Government organ, the Advertiser, is hand in glove with the perpetrator of the “Piracy” hoax, published in the S. F. Alta, is made apparent by the fact that a stereotype of the article was received at that office per Alameda, and from which the ‘extra’ was printed. Some hoax, more costly, will probably be now played by the ‘four Jacks’ in the cabinet.)

“2. Criticism never attacks the individual, but only his work. In every case the attack is on a man’s acts, or on some thing, and not upon the man himself. A true critic never indulges in personalities.

“3. True criticism never imputes or insinuates dishonorable motives, unless justice requires it, and then only oa the clearest proof.

“The critic never takes advantage of the occasion to gratify private malice, or to attain any other object beyond the fair discussion of matters of public interest, and the judicious guidance of public taste.”

Notwithstanding the snarl of jealousy of our antiquated neighbor, it is the intention of the proprietors of the Advertiser to repeat the enterprise shown by them on Tuesday last. No expense will be spared to furnish the most interesting news within an hour of each steamer’s arrival. By the S. S. Zealandia, we expect something special that will afford further criticism for our out-of-date, old-time-custom, weekly contemporary.

[I have not found the actual special issue of the PCA printed on 12/23/1884, soon after the arrival of the Alameda from San Francisco. It might not be on the microfilm, and there may not be an extant copy of it because it was not a regular issue. But stereotypes… new technology arrives in Hawaii!]

(Pacific Commercial Advertiser, 12/25/1884, p. 2)

The Gazette...

Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume 30, Number 203, Page 2. December 25, 1884.

More on the Hawaiian National Hymn, 1874.

Hawaiian National Hymn.

William Charles Lunalilo, whose death we briefly announced in our last issue, was descended from the highest of the Royal line of Hawaiian Chiefs. His mother was Kekauluohi, known as Kaahumanu III., Kuhina Nui (Premier) under Kamehameha III., and was married to Charles Kanaina, from which marriage two sons were born Davida and William. The former died when quite young. William, soon after his mother’s death, when about eight years of age, was placed in the Royal School, kept by Mr. and Mrs. Cooke, where he received a liberal English education, and as he possessed naturally, a quick mind, he became one of the best scholars in the school. For English classical literature he had great fondness, and his familiarity with the English poets was remarkable. It was this taste that led him to indulge in writing poetry, some of which was well composed. On one occasion, twelve years ago, he called on us in our editorial sanctum and sat down at our table. In the course of the conversation, we suggested that he become a competitor for the best prize which had been offered for the best Hawaiian version of “God Save the King.” He took a pen and in fifteen or twenty minutes handed us his verses, which we enclosed in an envelope and passed with ten or twelve others to the judges, who awarded it the prize, and this is known now as the Hawaiian National Hymn “God Save the King.” We instance this to illustrate the extraordinary mental qualities with which he was endowed.—Gazette, Feb. 11.

E Ola ka Moi i ke Akua.

HAKUIA E KA MEA KIEKIE WILLIAM C. LUNALILO.

1. Ke Akua mana mau,
Hoomaikai, pomaikai
I ka Moi!
Kou lima mana mau,
Malama, kiai mai
Ko makou nei Moi,
E ola e!

2. Ka inoa kamahao
Lei nani o makou,
E ola e!
Kou eheu uhi mai,
Pale na ino e,
Ka makou pule nou,
E ola e!

3. Imua ou makou,
Ke ‘Lii o na Alii,
E aloha mai;
E mau ke ea e
O ke aupuni nei,
E ola mau makou,
Me ka Moi.

God Save the King.

TRANSLATED BY REV. L. LYONS.

1. Eternal, mighty God,
Bless, from thy bright abode,
Our Sovereign King;
May thy all-powerful arm
Ward from our Sire all harm,
Let no vile foe alarm,
Long may he reign!

2. Royal, distinguished name,
Our beauteous diadem,
Long life be thine;
Thy wing spread o’er our land.
From every wrong defend,
For thee our prayers ascend,
Long live our King!

3. Before thee, King of Kings,
Of whom all nature sings,
Our prayer we bring;
Oh, let our kingdom live,
Life, peace and union give,
Let all thy care receive;
Bless thou our King!

(Friend, 3/2/1874, p. 24)

Hawaiian National Hymn.

The Friend, New Series, Volume 23, Number 3, Page 24. March 2, 1874.

Announcement for the opening of Kamehameha School for Boys, 1887.

THE KAMEHAMEHA SCHOOL FOR
BOYS

THE KAMEHAMEHA SCHOOL FOR BOYS
will be ready for the admission of students on the

First Tuesday of October, 1887

Only a limited number of Students will be received this year, and those desiring to enter the School in the future must apply on the 1st day of September 1887.

Each student will occupy a separate room furnished with bed, table, and chair; and a list of items to be furnished by each student will be sent if asked for in advanced to the teacher.

Each student will be allowed to carry out 12 hours a week of manual labor. For industrial arts, two hours a day, and five days a week. Military drilling and physical education will be a portion of the curriculum everyday.

Arithmetic, English Language, Popular Science [Akeakamai], Elementary Algebra [Anahonua], Free-hand and Mechanical Drawing [Kakau me Kaha Kii], Practical Geometry [Moleanahonua], Bookkeeping [malama Buke Kalepa], tailoring [tela humu lole], printing [pai palapala], masonry [hamo puna], and other similar things, and blacksmithing.

tuition for the schooling.

($40) FORTY DOLLARS PER YEAR.

$20 to be paid at the beginning of each quarter.

The students must get prior approval from the Doctor attesting to their good health, and letters of recommendation from other schools.

Examinations for those entering will be held on MONDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1887, at the schoolhouse at Palama, 8:30 A. M. They will show their knowledge in reading, writing, geography, the four rules of Arithmetic, writing in English, and the spelling of 100 English words.

As for anything else, you may find out by asking the principal.

REV. WILLIAM B. OLESON.

[See also the English-language announcement found in the May 24th issue of the Hawaiian Gazette. It is interesting to note especially the difference in the wording for the part about manual labor.]

(Kuokoa 5/28/1887, p. 2)

KE KULA KAMEHAMEHA NO NA KEIKIKANE.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXVI, Helu 22, Aoao 2. Mei 28, 1887.

E o, e Kaleleonalani! Queen Emma and Kamehameha Schools, 1887.

KAMEHAMEHA SCHOOL.

The gates of the Kamehameha School for boys will open in October of this current year. The imperfections of one of the dormitories of 30 x 64 [feet] are almost smoothed out, and another was complete before. These dormitories are two storied, bottom floor and top floor, and each of them have 24 rooms of 8 x 12, and a hallway [keena waena loloa]. One room of each house is furnished with facilities to wash up and clean, and the rest of the rooms are bedrooms, each being supplied with a iron bed, desk, chair, closet, and some other furnishings. The rooms are clean and lighted, and well-furnished for the student.

The dining hall of 29 x 81 feet is a separate building, and it is 18 feet from the bottom to the ceiling, and it will fit two-hundred people. A stone building will be built behind this, which will be the kitchen and and a place to store the food and all cookware and dinnerware.

A proper schoolhouse will be built after the buildings that are desired to be completed quickly are done, and in the meantime, parts of the dining hall will be set aside as school rooms.

A clear spring will supply the school with water and it is by steam pumps that the water will be brought up and filled into a separate water tank, and from there into many pipes laid all over the grounds and buildings.

The curriculum at this school teaches thoroughly the branches of the English language; and outside of that are the teaching of industrial arts. Some rooms of the school house will be set aside as rooms for carpentry, printing, tailoring, blacksmithing, and masonry. The instruction will take place under the direction of a mechanic [mekanika]. Some time will also be set aside for military drilling, physical development, and so forth.

There are fun and cheerful activities for the students. This school sits on a serene site, living there is pleasant, and it is separated from the town of Honolulu.

In a section of this paper, the reader will see the advertisement dealing with this School. This is the educating home established for the benefit of Hawaii’s children who seek education, and built by way of the estate of the late Dowager Queen Ema Kaleleonalani. This home stands in the plain of Kaiwiula in Kalihi, and it is near completion. On the first Tuesday of October 1887, this school will open to students.

It has been heard that the assets of the school will be increased for the good of the children, and for now, parents who want their children to progress forward are being urged to rush to this new home where knowledge is increased. Much benefits will be gained if patient and if the aloha of the royal parent Ema Kaleleonalani is held resolute as well by Hawaii’s children, the one who left this great gift behind. Look at its published notice.

[On this, the day after Queen Emma’s 177th birthday, i thought it would be a good thing  to look back at her role in the establishment of the Kamehameha Schools, a role which she is not recognized often for today.

Notice the difference between the article appearing in the May 24th edition of the Hawaiian Gazette, “The Kamehameha Schools.” (probably what the article is based upon) and this Hawaiian-Language article.]

(Kuokoa, 5/28/1887, p. 2)

KE KULA KAMEHAMEHA.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXVI, Helu 22, Aoao 2. Mei 28, 1887.