More on the Hawaiian National Hymn, 1874.

Hawaiian National Hymn.

William Charles Lunalilo, whose death we briefly announced in our last issue, was descended from the highest of the Royal line of Hawaiian Chiefs. His mother was Kekauluohi, known as Kaahumanu III., Kuhina Nui (Premier) under Kamehameha III., and was married to Charles Kanaina, from which marriage two sons were born Davida and William. The former died when quite young. William, soon after his mother’s death, when about eight years of age, was placed in the Royal School, kept by Mr. and Mrs. Cooke, where he received a liberal English education, and as he possessed naturally, a quick mind, he became one of the best scholars in the school. For English classical literature he had great fondness, and his familiarity with the English poets was remarkable. It was this taste that led him to indulge in writing poetry, some of which was well composed. On one occasion, twelve years ago, he called on us in our editorial sanctum and sat down at our table. In the course of the conversation, we suggested that he become a competitor for the best prize which had been offered for the best Hawaiian version of “God Save the King.” He took a pen and in fifteen or twenty minutes handed us his verses, which we enclosed in an envelope and passed with ten or twelve others to the judges, who awarded it the prize, and this is known now as the Hawaiian National Hymn “God Save the King.” We instance this to illustrate the extraordinary mental qualities with which he was endowed.—Gazette, Feb. 11.

E Ola ka Moi i ke Akua.

HAKUIA E KA MEA KIEKIE WILLIAM C. LUNALILO.

1. Ke Akua mana mau,
Hoomaikai, pomaikai
I ka Moi!
Kou lima mana mau,
Malama, kiai mai
Ko makou nei Moi,
E ola e!

2. Ka inoa kamahao
Lei nani o makou,
E ola e!
Kou eheu uhi mai,
Pale na ino e,
Ka makou pule nou,
E ola e!

3. Imua ou makou,
Ke ‘Lii o na Alii,
E aloha mai;
E mau ke ea e
O ke aupuni nei,
E ola mau makou,
Me ka Moi.

God Save the King.

TRANSLATED BY REV. L. LYONS.

1. Eternal, mighty God,
Bless, from thy bright abode,
Our Sovereign King;
May thy all-powerful arm
Ward from our Sire all harm,
Let no vile foe alarm,
Long may he reign!

2. Royal, distinguished name,
Our beauteous diadem,
Long life be thine;
Thy wing spread o’er our land.
From every wrong defend,
For thee our prayers ascend,
Long live our King!

3. Before thee, King of Kings,
Of whom all nature sings,
Our prayer we bring;
Oh, let our kingdom live,
Life, peace and union give,
Let all thy care receive;
Bless thou our King!

(Friend, 3/2/1874, p. 24)

Hawaiian National Hymn.

The Friend, New Series, Volume 23, Number 3, Page 24. March 2, 1874.

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Announcement for the opening of Kamehameha School for Boys, 1887.

THE KAMEHAMEHA SCHOOL FOR
BOYS

THE KAMEHAMEHA SCHOOL FOR BOYS
will be ready for the admission of students on the

First Tuesday of October, 1887

Only a limited number of Students will be received this year, and those desiring to enter the School in the future must apply on the 1st day of September 1887.

Each student will occupy a separate room furnished with bed, table, and chair; and a list of items to be furnished by each student will be sent if asked for in advanced to the teacher.

Each student will be allowed to carry out 12 hours a week of manual labor. For industrial arts, two hours a day, and five days a week. Military drilling and physical education will be a portion of the curriculum everyday.

Arithmetic, English Language, Popular Science [Akeakamai], Elementary Algebra [Anahonua], Free-hand and Mechanical Drawing [Kakau me Kaha Kii], Practical Geometry [Moleanahonua], Bookkeeping [malama Buke Kalepa], tailoring [tela humu lole], printing [pai palapala], masonry [hamo puna], and other similar things, and blacksmithing.

tuition for the schooling.

($40) FORTY DOLLARS PER YEAR.

$20 to be paid at the beginning of each quarter.

The students must get prior approval from the Doctor attesting to their good health, and letters of recommendation from other schools.

Examinations for those entering will be held on MONDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1887, at the schoolhouse at Palama, 8:30 A. M. They will show their knowledge in reading, writing, geography, the four rules of Arithmetic, writing in English, and the spelling of 100 English words.

As for anything else, you may find out by asking the principal.

REV. WILLIAM B. OLESON.

[See also the English-language announcement found in the May 24th issue of the Hawaiian Gazette. It is interesting to note especially the difference in the wording for the part about manual labor.]

(Kuokoa 5/28/1887, p. 2)

KE KULA KAMEHAMEHA NO NA KEIKIKANE.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXVI, Helu 22, Aoao 2. Mei 28, 1887.

E o, e Kaleleonalani! Queen Emma and Kamehameha Schools, 1887.

KAMEHAMEHA SCHOOL.

The gates of the Kamehameha School for boys will open in October of this current year. The imperfections of one of the dormitories of 30 x 64 [feet] are almost smoothed out, and another was complete before. These dormitories are two storied, bottom floor and top floor, and each of them have 24 rooms of 8 x 12, and a hallway [keena waena loloa]. One room of each house is furnished with facilities to wash up and clean, and the rest of the rooms are bedrooms, each being supplied with a iron bed, desk, chair, closet, and some other furnishings. The rooms are clean and lighted, and well-furnished for the student.

The dining hall of 29 x 81 feet is a separate building, and it is 18 feet from the bottom to the ceiling, and it will fit two-hundred people. A stone building will be built behind this, which will be the kitchen and and a place to store the food and all cookware and dinnerware.

A proper schoolhouse will be built after the buildings that are desired to be completed quickly are done, and in the meantime, parts of the dining hall will be set aside as school rooms.

A clear spring will supply the school with water and it is by steam pumps that the water will be brought up and filled into a separate water tank, and from there into many pipes laid all over the grounds and buildings.

The curriculum at this school teaches thoroughly the branches of the English language; and outside of that are the teaching of industrial arts. Some rooms of the school house will be set aside as rooms for carpentry, printing, tailoring, blacksmithing, and masonry. The instruction will take place under the direction of a mechanic [mekanika]. Some time will also be set aside for military drilling, physical development, and so forth.

There are fun and cheerful activities for the students. This school sits on a serene site, living there is pleasant, and it is separated from the town of Honolulu.

In a section of this paper, the reader will see the advertisement dealing with this School. This is the educating home established for the benefit of Hawaii’s children who seek education, and built by way of the estate of the late Dowager Queen Ema Kaleleonalani. This home stands in the plain of Kaiwiula in Kalihi, and it is near completion. On the first Tuesday of October 1887, this school will open to students.

It has been heard that the assets of the school will be increased for the good of the children, and for now, parents who want their children to progress forward are being urged to rush to this new home where knowledge is increased. Much benefits will be gained if patient and if the aloha of the royal parent Ema Kaleleonalani is held resolute as well by Hawaii’s children, the one who left this great gift behind. Look at its published notice.

[On this, the day after Queen Emma’s 177th birthday, i thought it would be a good thing  to look back at her role in the establishment of the Kamehameha Schools, a role which she is not recognized often for today.

Notice the difference between the article appearing in the May 24th edition of the Hawaiian Gazette, “The Kamehameha Schools.” (probably what the article is based upon) and this Hawaiian-Language article.]

(Kuokoa, 5/28/1887, p. 2)

KE KULA KAMEHAMEHA.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXVI, Helu 22, Aoao 2. Mei 28, 1887.

Independence Day, 1867.

In the Announcements Column of the Government’s English newspaper [Hawaiian Gazette] of yesterday, we saw an announcement calling all those who want to celebrate the coming 28th of November, to all come down to the reading room of the Hotel of Kaopuaua to discuss it tomorrow night, Friday. This is what the haole are doing; where are the Hawaiians for whom this day is truly for?

(Au Okoa, 9/26/1867, p. 2)

Ma na Kolamu Olelo Hoolaha...

Ke Au Okoa, Buke III, Helu 23, Aoao 2. Sepatemaba 26, 1867.

English version of David Kanewanui’s Death Announcement, 1902.

DEATH OF DAVID KANEWANUI, EDITOR OF WEEKLY KUOKOA

THE LATE DAVID KANEWANUI.

THE many friends of David Kanewanui will learn with sorrow of his death, as the result of the gunshot wound received the evening of May 6. It occured early yesterday afternoon at the Queen’s Hospital.

David Kanewanui was born on the Island of Kauai twenty-six years ago. He graduated from Kamehameha School in 1894 and shortly afterwards accepted a position as teacher in the school at Olowalu, where he taught for two years. From Olowalu he went to the Hilo Boarding School, where he taught for another two years, coming from there to Honolulu to take a clerkship in the Auditor’s office.

Something over a year ago the Gazette Company was fortunate enough to secure his services as editor of the Nupepa Kuokoa, which position he filled with ability up to the time of the accident.

The popularity and circulation of the Kuokoa grew under his editorship, for his heart was in his work and he felt that he was doing something for his people. All subjects were handled for what he believed to be the best interests of the Hawaiians, and this being recognized, gave him great influence.

He was always courteous and pleasant and was a great favorite with his co-workers and with the young Hawaiians, many of whom looked to him for counsel and advice.

A fine baseball player, he was a member of the Kamehameha team and was captain of the Hawaiian Gazette Co.’s team.

The funeral, to be announced after the post-mortem, will take place from Kamehameha chapel.

(Hawaiian Gazette, 5/23/1902, p. 5)

DEATH OF DAVID KANEWANUI, EDITOR OF WEEKLY KUOKOA

The Hawaiian Gazette, Volume XXXVII, Number 39, Page 5. May 23, 1902.

Kalakaua’s study abroad program, 1881.

ROME, ITALY, Mar. 29, 1881.

TO THE LAHUI HAWAII:—

We saw in the newspaper “Hawaiian Gazette” of February 2, 1881, where it states, that the Hawaiian Government constantly sends money to Mr. Moreno for us, and from within this sum, he supports himself.

Without counting the $800 that the Government sent for us by way of Mr. Martin of Paris, that was soon spent on our many expenses—for the trains, steamships, hotels, and so forth; while being careful with our spending; Mr. Moreno took care of the remainder with his own money, from the day we left Paris until this day here in Rome. This is the truth, for we saw this with our own eyes.

Therefore, what the “Hawaiian Gazette” said was plain deception.

To attest to the truth, we affix our names.

Your children in foreign lands,

Robert W. Wilcox,
James K. Booth,
Robert N. Boyd.

(Ko Hawaii Pae Aina, 5/14/1881, p. 3)

ROMA, ITALIA, Mar. 29, 1881...

Ko Hawaii Pae Aina, Buke IV, Helu 20, Aoao 3. Mei 14, 1881.