More on ’93 KS graduate, Abraham Pihi, 1898.

MY DEAR SWEETHEART HAS JUST PASSED, AND MY EMOTIONAL SUPPORT HAS BEEN TAKEN AWAY.

Mr. Editor.

Aloha oe:

Should it be satisfactory to you and your workers, here is my bundle of olive leaves that is placed above, so that our many loved ones living all the way from Haehae where the sun rises to the pleasant base of Lehua where the sun sets may see it.

My beloved has gone, my companion who I would talk with in days gone by, that is my beloved man, Mr. Aprahama Pihi, who is a native and a familiar one of the land famous for the “Kanilehua” [Hilo] and the fragrant bowers of hala of Puna, and the land of the Haao Rains [Kaʻū], that is the roots of my dear husband who left me, his companion, his wife, grieving at the side of his grave. Auwe! How dreadful. Abraham Pihi was born in Puueo, Hilo, Hawaii on the 5th of January, 1872, of E. P. Hoaai (m) and Lilia Palapala (f), and the two of them had 7 children: 5 daughters and 2 sons; and 2 of them went off in search of the footprints of their parents, and 5 remain mourning on this side: 4 girls and one boy.

He was educated at the Hilo Boarding School under the principal, Rev. W. R. Oleson [W. R. Olesona]¹. After he was done there, he entered Kamehameha School in 1893. He was at that school for 1 year, but because it was learned that he had the disease that separates families, he asked the principal, that being the Rev. W. R. Oleson, to release him. He returned to Wailuku, Maui, where his mother was living with his new father, the Rev. S. Kapu; he lived with his parents until he was taken in by the disease that separates families; he was taken from his parents and his younger siblings. He was taken away to this land of no friends in 1895. The number of years he had in this world was 24 and eleven months and 13 days, when his last breath was released. Continue reading

Announcement for the opening of Kamehameha School for Boys, 1887.

THE KAMEHAMEHA SCHOOL FOR
BOYS

THE KAMEHAMEHA SCHOOL FOR BOYS
will be ready for the admission of students on the

First Tuesday of October, 1887

Only a limited number of Students will be received this year, and those desiring to enter the School in the future must apply on the 1st day of September 1887.

Each student will occupy a separate room furnished with bed, table, and chair; and a list of items to be furnished by each student will be sent if asked for in advanced to the teacher.

Each student will be allowed to carry out 12 hours a week of manual labor. For industrial arts, two hours a day, and five days a week. Military drilling and physical education will be a portion of the curriculum everyday.

Arithmetic, English Language, Popular Science [Akeakamai], Elementary Algebra [Anahonua], Free-hand and Mechanical Drawing [Kakau me Kaha Kii], Practical Geometry [Moleanahonua], Bookkeeping [malama Buke Kalepa], tailoring [tela humu lole], printing [pai palapala], masonry [hamo puna], and other similar things, and blacksmithing.

tuition for the schooling.

($40) FORTY DOLLARS PER YEAR.

$20 to be paid at the beginning of each quarter.

The students must get prior approval from the Doctor attesting to their good health, and letters of recommendation from other schools.

Examinations for those entering will be held on MONDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1887, at the schoolhouse at Palama, 8:30 A. M. They will show their knowledge in reading, writing, geography, the four rules of Arithmetic, writing in English, and the spelling of 100 English words.

As for anything else, you may find out by asking the principal.

REV. WILLIAM B. OLESON.

[See also the English-language announcement found in the May 24th issue of the Hawaiian Gazette. It is interesting to note especially the difference in the wording for the part about manual labor.]

(Kuokoa 5/28/1887, p. 2)

KE KULA KAMEHAMEHA NO NA KEIKIKANE.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXVI, Helu 22, Aoao 2. Mei 28, 1887.