The wait continues, 1893–2018.

RESTORATION DAY OF HAWAII NEI.

In the first half of the month of February, 1843, Lord George Paulet [Lo Keoki] arrived on the shores of Hawaii nei, and due to some things he thought were right, he took down the Hawaiian Flag and raised the British Flag, and this was the first time that the sovereignty of our land was taken. With that act however, the Royal standard [hae Kalaunu] was left alone along with the Sovereign in His place; this was not usurped; and peace was kept by the Hulumanu, the soldiers of Kauikeaouli at the time, and the makaainana remained then under the rule of the King, and they kneeled and prayed to God for the return of the sovereignty of the land to righteousness. Continue reading

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Patriots celebrate La Hoihoi Ea in lands afar! 1862.

[For the Kuokoa.]

Hoihoi Ea Banquet

FOR THE HAWAIIAN NATION, ON THE 31st OF JULY, 1862.

The 31st of July is a day celebrated by the Hawaiian Nation because it is the day on which the sovereignty of the land was restored, from the year 1843 until this year in which it is remembered. Therefore, we, the natives of Hawaii who live in this strange land, because of our aloha for our land of birth, make this a day of remembrance and a day of prayer, setting aside our labors.

This is what was done on that day: Before that day, food was purchased, and in the morning of that day, the food was cooked first, and all the food was assembled on a table that was covered with the green foliage of the Puluki;¹ and when the conch was sounded, the fellow diners came and sat upon their own seats. Then L. H. Kapuaa stood and spoke of the nature of activities of the day; before the singing. This is one of the songs composed by the youths of the Snow Flurry [na keiki o ka Ehu Hau]. This is it below.

  1. Aloha i ka aina,
    I ke one hanau,
    O ke ao lewa he inoa,
    O ka Haku ka Moi,
    Na keiki kamaaina,
    Na pua ala mau,
    Ua hoihoi mai ka ea,
    Kau  hou ka Hae Hawaii.
    .
  2. Nolaila e na hoa,
    E ku a mele pu,
    Hauoli like kakou,
    Ma keia waoakua,
    Ua nui na la i hala,
    Aole kakou i hoomanao,
    Ua hoihoi mai ka ea,
    Kau hou ka Hae Hawaii.
    .
  3. O Thomas ka mama,
    Ma na ale o ke kai,
    A hiki ma Hawaii,
    Kuka me ka Moi,
    Me na Luna Aupuni,
    Holo ke kuikahi,
    Ua hoihoi mai ka ea,
    Kau hou ka Hae Hawaii.
    .
  4. Hoopauia o Lokeoki,
    Hoi nele aku ia,
    Ka moana Pakipika,
    Hauoli Hawaii,
    I ka la hope o Iulai,
    Ala ae kakou,
    Ua hoihoi mai ka ea,
    Kau hou ka Hae Hawaii.
    .
  5. E ala e na keiki,
    O ka Ehu Hau,
    Mele me ka hauoli,
    Hoonani ke Akua,
    Nana kokua mai,
    Ka ea o ka aina,
    Ua hoihoi mai ke ea,
    Kau hou ka Hae Hawaii.

Continue reading

La Hoihoi Ea, 1895.

RESTORATION DAY OF HAWAII.

The coming Wednesday, July 31, is the day that Admiral Thomas restored the glorious Flag of Hawaii nei, after he stripped these Hawaiian Islands and took them under his power on the 25th of February 1843.

And from the taking of the beautiful Flag of Hawaii until its return was five months and some days, and the glory of Hawaii was regained, for the beautiful, magnificent stripes of the Hawaiian Flag was seen once more.

This day is a sacred day in the hearts of all true Hawaiians, and they commemorate the day that the life returned to the loving communities of Hawaii nei.

And the proclamation proclaimed by the King, Kauikeaouli Kamehameha III was fulfilled, as he commanded all the devout from Hawaii to Kauai to kneel down and give glory to God Almighty for returning the beloved sovereignty to our homeland.

It is true that the supplication of the devout was heard, for the beautiful Flag of Hawaii nei was indeed restored by the Power of God, Jehovah.

Therefore, O Lahui, let us be happy and rejoice, for gaining this glorious day which established the foundation for a new step, that being the Independence of these Islands given by France, Britain, and America.

Now all true faithful ones should take some time on this awesome and sacred day as time to glorify God, Jehovah almighty for his true love for us.

(Oiaio, 8/2/1895, p. 4)

Oiaio_8_2_1895_4.png

Ka Oiaio, Buke VII, Helu 22, Aoao 4. Augate 2, 1895.

Restoration Day celebration by true patriots, 1894.

LA HOIHOI EA.

Fitting Remembrances for that Great Day.

This past Tuesday, July 31, was the day that the independence and the beloved flag of this land was restored after being seized and forcefully taken by Lord George Paulet [Lo Keoki Pauleti] on February 25, 1843, without orders from his Nation, and Rear-Admiral Thomas [Hope-Adimerala Kamaki] was the one who restored it on this day in that very year, five months and some days after it was stolen. This day is celebrated by all true patriots with many feasts all over the place.

In the early morning, the Royal Hawaiian Band [Puali Puhiohe Lahui] went to entertain the Alii, the Monarch, at Washington Place. When they entered the yard after marching from Emma Square [Ema Kuea], the door was swung open and they marched to the Ewa corner of the house and began to play. The Alii came out and sat on the lanai on that side. The songs that were played were full of reverence, awe, and joy. Outside before the front yard were the masses, and children climbed the fence and went inside. From what we saw, the crowd was looking intensely to try and maybe get a glimpse of the Alii, showing that the songs by the band wasn’t what they desired, but it was the sight of the face and the appearance of the Ruler that they were after, as it is sung: “Our desire is but for our Alii, The one we care for.” [“O ke Alii wale no ka makou makemake, O ka luhi o maua me ia nei.”]

After the music was over, the Alii stood and spoke briefly before these people who stood steadfast behind her, with words of encouragement. She stressed that the lahui keep the peace, like her statement of January 14, 1893, for the welfare of her people, and that it would be but a few more days before, according to assurances she received, that she will once again have them [? e kikoo hou mai ai oia ia lakou] go back to their lives just as before. The Alii had as well some words filled with aloha, and there was not one from amongst the members of the band who did not shed tears; some shed great many tears while blowing their noses into handkerchiefs.

That night, on the grounds of the Hawaiian Hotel [Hotele Hawaii], they gave an open concert to entertain the public, and just as was seen at the performance they put on earlier, so too was this one, and it was very well attended. Those who attended were very happy, there being perhaps 3000, from men to women, from the old to they young, and from those of high stature to low. They played without electric lights, but were illuminated by Japanese lanterns and their pewter lanterns. It would appear as if they were totally thwarted by the Government [P. G.], but in fact it was the deceitful ones who were disappointed, because they were all the more delighted. There was a single wealth-seeking haole [kolea kauahua] that we saw sitting on the lanai of the Hotel, on the Waikiki side, with his mouth wide open, maybe because he witnessed the unmatched beauty of that great night of entertainment, that person was the one with a maimed hand from Boston.

[Let the story never be forgotten. Ua mau ke ea o ka aina i ka pono!]

(Makaainana, 8/6/1894, p. 1)

LA HOIHOI EA.

Ka Makaainana, Buke II—-Ano Hou, Helu 6, Aoao 1. Augate 6, 1894.

W. D. Alexander on Restoration Day, 1896.

A MEMORABLE DAY

Admiral Thomas Declines the Provisional Cession of the Islands.

Professor Alexander’ Brief But Graphic Description of the Important Events of 1843

On the 10th of February 1843, the British frigate Carysfort, commanded by Lord George Paulet, arrived at Honolulu, and showed displeasure by withholding the usual salutes. The commander seems to have placed himself completely under the direction of Mr Alexander Simpson. The United States sloop-of-war Boston, Captain Long, arrived on the 13th.

The king who had been sent for at Lord Paulet’s request, arrived from Lahaiua on the 16th. Lord Paulet refused to treat with him through Dr. Judd, his agent, and late in the evening of the 17th sent him a peremptory letter, inclosing six demands with the threat that if they were not complied with by four o’clock p. m. the next day, “immediate coercive steps would be taken.” The substance of these demands was as follows:

1st. That an attachment laid on Charlton’s property, at the suit of an English firm for an old debt, be removed, that the land claimed by him be “restored,” and reparation to his representatives for the losses which they had suffered through the alleged injustice of the government.

2d. The immediate recognition of Mr. Simpson as British Consul, and a salute of twenty-one guns to the British flag.

3d. A guarantee that no British subject should be put in irons, unless for a felony.

4th. That a new trial should be held in the case of Skinner vs. Dominis.

5th. That all disputes between British subjects and others be referred to mixed juries, one half of whom should be British subjects approved by the consul.

6th. A direct communication between the king and the Acting British Consul for the immediate settlement of all complaints on the part of British subjects. Continue reading

Restoration Anthem, 1843.

The following hymn was sung by various circles on the day of the Restoration; as well as after the Temperance Picnic, given by His Majesty, to Foreign Residents and Naval Officers, (English and American,) at his Country Residence in Nuuanu Valley, August 3d.

RESTORATION ANTHEM.

Tune, ‘God Save the King.’

Hail! to our rightful King!
We joyful honors bring
This day to thee!
Long live your Majesty!
Long reign this dynasty!
And for posterity
The sceptre be!

Hail! to the worthy name!
Worthy his Country’s Fame
Thomas, the brave!
Long shall they virtues be,
Shrined in our memory
Who came to set us free,
Quick oe’r the wave!

Hail! to our Heavenly King!
To Thee our Thanks we bring,
Worthy of all;
Loud we thine honors raise!
Loud is our song of praise!
Smile on our future days,
Sovereign of all!

July 31, 1843.  Edwin O. Hall.

[This post may be just a little early this year, but it is good to not just remember momentous events like Ka La Hoihoi Ea just one day of the year. Last year, the Hawaiian Historical Society put up handwritten lyrics of this mele on their Facebook page on the 27th of July. Here we find it in print, just a few days following its being penned by Edwin O. Hall!]

(Temperance Advocate and Seamen’s Friend, 8/11/1843, p. 42)

RESTORATION ANTHEM.

Temperance Advocate and Seamen’s Friend, Volume I, Number VIII, Page 42. August 11, 1843.

La Hoihoi Ea, 1912.

DAY NOT TO BE FORGOTTEN BY TRUE HAWAIIANS.

The past 31st of July was a great day celebrated in days of the monarchs, from Kamehameha III all the way until the end of the monarchy; on this day sovereignty was restored and the Hawaiian Flag was raised at that famous park, “Thomas Square,” by Admiral Thomas [Adimarala Tomas], who did the restoration, being that on the 25th of February, 1843, the British Flag was raised over the Fort of Honolulu.

As a result of the threats by Lord George Paulet; Britain’s high officer on the Pacific Ocean, it was Admiral Thomas who restored the sovereignty of the land, and re-raised the Hawaiian Flag on the flag staffs at the Palace (Iolani) and the fort of Kaleiopapa Kauikeaouli Kamehameha III, the king of Hawaii at the time; Aloha to Hawaii of old, which is the Territory of Hawaii now.

(Kuokoa Home Rula, 8/1/1912, p. 1)

KA LA POINA OLE I NA HAWAII OIAIO.

Kuokoa Home Rula, Buke X, Helu 31, Aoao 1. Augate 1, 1912.