Restoration Anthem, 1843.

The following hymn was sung by various circles on the day of the Restoration; as well as after the Temperance Picnic, given by His Majesty, to Foreign Residents and Naval Officers, (English and American,) at his Country Residence in Nuuanu Valley, August 3d.

RESTORATION ANTHEM.

Tune, ‘God Save the King.’

Hail! to our rightful King!
We joyful honors bring
This day to thee!
Long live your Majesty!
Long reign this dynasty!
And for posterity
The sceptre be!

Hail! to the worthy name!
Worthy his Country’s Fame
Thomas, the brave!
Long shall they virtues be,
Shrined in our memory
Who came to set us free,
Quick oe’r the wave!

Hail! to our Heavenly King!
To Thee our Thanks we bring,
Worthy of all;
Loud we thine honors raise!
Loud is our song of praise!
Smile on our future days,
Sovereign of all!

July 31, 1843.  Edwin O. Hall.

[This post may be just a little early this year, but it is good to not just remember momentous events like Ka La Hoihoi Ea just one day of the year. Last year, the Hawaiian Historical Society put up handwritten lyrics of this mele on their Facebook page on the 27th of July. Here we find it in print, just a few days following its being penned by Edwin O. Hall!]

(Temperance Advocate and Seamen’s Friend, 8/11/1843, p. 42)

RESTORATION ANTHEM.

Temperance Advocate and Seamen’s Friend, Volume I, Number VIII, Page 42. August 11, 1843.

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La Hoihoi Ea, 1912.

DAY NOT TO BE FORGOTTEN BY TRUE HAWAIIANS.

The past 31st of July was a great day celebrated in days of the monarchs, from Kamehameha III all the way until the end of the monarchy; on this day sovereignty was restored and the Hawaiian Flag was raised at that famous park, “Thomas Square,” by Admiral Thomas [Adimarala Tomas], who did the restoration, being that on the 25th of February, 1843, the British Flag was raised over the Fort of Honolulu.

As a result of the threats by Lord George Paulet; Britain’s high officer on the Pacific Ocean, it was Admiral Thomas who restored the sovereignty of the land, and re-raised the Hawaiian Flag on the flag staffs at the Palace (Iolani) and the fort of Kaleiopapa Kauikeaouli Kamehameha III, the king of Hawaii at the time; Aloha to Hawaii of old, which is the Territory of Hawaii now.

(Kuokoa Home Rula, 8/1/1912, p. 1)

KA LA POINA OLE I NA HAWAII OIAIO.

Kuokoa Home Rula, Buke X, Helu 31, Aoao 1. Augate 1, 1912.

Even more from Ka Nonanona, August 8, 1843.

TRAITORS.

When we reached the residence of the king, at Honukaopu [Honokaupu ?], Kekuanaoa fetched some traitors who were kept at Hale Kauila; perhaps there were 140 of them. The king did not allow them to accompany him to raise the flag.

This is the nature of their treason. When this archipelago was not clearly under Capt. Lord George Paulet, they left Kamehameha III, and they swore allegiance to the Queen of Britain. This is probably the reason they swore allegiance to Victoria; because they were paid money. They therefore curried his favor [hoopilimeaai].

They were probably prepared to go with George to this war and that; if he warred against the king, so too would they; and if he went to war against the local haole or the Missionaries, they would fight as well! If soldiers of enlightened lands took an oath in this fashion, their heads would fall. But because of the patience and goodness of Kamehameha III, they were saved.

When they came in the presence of the king, they gave a three gun salute to Hawaii’s flag; and they swore once again to live obediently beneath Kamehameha III. After that, they spent time with the King, and shook hands.

(Nonanona, 8/8/1843, pp. 25 & 26.)

POE KIPI.

Ka Nonanona, Buke 3, Pepa 6, Aoao 25. Augate 8, 1843.

Wahine o Beritania...

Ka Nonanona, Buke 3, Pepa 6, Aoao 26. Augate 8, 1843.

More from Ka Nonanona, August 8, 1843.

THE RESTORATION OF THE KINGDOM.

How great are the blessings of Kamehameha III and his subjects now, for the difficulties have subsided and the sovereignty of the land has been restored. No more is the living as subjects under the men of Victoria.

Kamehameha III is now the monarch of Hawaii nei. The British flag has been taken down on this day, July 31, 1843, and Hawaii’s flag has been raised once more. Therefore, this will be the day of the year that will be commemorated with joy from here forth.

Here is an awesome event that happened today. At half past eight, Admiral Thomas went along with some sailors, from the three British ships (anchored at Honolulu now) to the fort of Honolulu at Kulaokahua, with large and small firearms, and spears, and there he awaited the king. At 10 o’clock, the king went with his soldiers, and arrived; the Hawaiian flag was unfurled, the British flag was taken down from the fort, and there the Hawaiian flag was raised, and so too in uplands, on the hill of Puawaina [Punchbowl]; many guns were shot off in salute all over: The soldiers did it, the warships as well, the forts as well, and the hill of Puawaina as well, and the whaling ships as well; and the bells were rung. The warships were festooned with flags; it was a fine and beautiful sight to see.

There were many people gathered to witness this amazing event, perhaps there were ten thousand in total. The soldiers carried out their duties well; they circled the king twice, while saluting him; they shot off their guns many times and marched here and there quickly and smartly. And when they were done, the crowd all returned to town.

(Nonanona, 8/8/1843, p. 25)

KA HOIHOI ANA O KE AUPUNI.

Ka Nonanona, Buke 3, Pepa 6, Aoao 25. Augate 8, 1843.

The first newspaper article printed following July 31, 1843.

BATTLESHIP.

On the 26th of July, the British Warship named Dublin arrived. Rear Admiral Thomas is the Captain. He is the officer in charge of all of the British warships in the Pacific Ocean.

When he received documents pertaining to Capt. Lord George Paulet aboard Victoria’s ship, and he heard clearly that the British flag was raised over these islands, he came quickly to restore the government to Kamehameha III. How fine is his aloha for the king, isn’t it! and for the citizens as well.

(Nonanona, 8/8/1843, p. 25)

MOKU MANUWA.

Ka Nonanona, Buke 3, Pepa 6, Aoao 25. Augate 8, 1843.