“American Queen”? 1917.

QUEEN LILIUOKALANI.

Clarifications by a Newspaper Writer about Her.

(Translated)

To “Ke Ola o Hawaii,”

Appearing in the British newspaper, The Outlook, of the other week, there were a number of awe-inspiring lines about our Queen, Liliuokalani, titled: “An American Queen.” This is how it went:

Americans sometimes forget that within one of the Territories of the United States there lives a real ex-Queen who owes the loss of her crown to the activities of American missionaries.

This Queen is, of course, Liliuokalani, of Hawaii, dethroned in the revolution of 1893. She is now a frail old lady of nearly seventy-nine years, and few but her immediate household and closest friends ever have the opportunity of meeting and talking with her.

It is interesting to record that because of one of the tragedies of the present war this aged Queen has permitted for the first time an American flag to fly over her home. The news of this incident comes to us in a letter from a correspondent in Hawaii. This correspondent writes:

It was my privilege a few days ago to attend what will possibly be the last public reception she will ever give to members of the Hawaiian Senate—some of her own race, and some sons of the missionaries who were mainly responsible for her overthrow. Although they belonged to a body absolutely democratic in form and elected by vote of the people as citizens of the United States, it was most interesting and somewhat touching to note the loyalty and love shown the aged ex-Queen: almost, one could imagine, as if she were still their reigning sovereign. Continue reading

And yet another on Liliu and the Red Cross, 1917.

Red Cross Flag, Gift of Queen, Flies From Hawaii’s Capitol

Governor Presents Emblem On Behalf of Liliuokalani

Governor Pinkham presenting Red Cross flag this morning. Col. Iaukea, the queen’s secretary, is seen holding the flag.

‘LET ALL WHO SEE IT BE REMINDED OF PATRIOTIC DUTY’ SAYS HER MAJESTY

FOR the first time in history a Red Cross flag was raised today over the territorial capitol, former palace of Hawaii. The flag is the gift of Queen Liliuokalani, and it was at her request that it was first displayed from the staff on the executive building.

In an impressive ceremony held at 10 o’clock this morning Governor Pinkham presented the flag on behalf of the Queen to the Allied War Relief Auxiliary and the Red Cross workers of Hawaii.

Mrs. Henry F. Damon, president of the auxiliary, received the flag and hoisted it to the breezes. The ceremony was held on the mauka steps of the capitol, fully 50 women and a number of men gathering for it. A generous clapping of hands greeted the banner as it opened against a clear background of blue sky and in the bright gleam of a morning sun.

After reading the queen’s letter, in which she presented the flag to the Red Cross workers, Governor Pinkham said:

“Women of the Red Cross:

“You are gathered here to receive from Her Majesty Ex-Queen Liliuokalani, her gift of the emblem of Universal Humanity, that you may raise it above your labors in behalf of those your countrymen and their allies, who with devotion to the very limit of suffering and death, offer themselves in this struggle for universal democracy.

“Your work of alleviation of suffering has touched the heart of Her Majesty and those in authority from the President of the United STates to those on her own island home and her friends, who now know of her deep personal interest, for it has been manifested in every way within her power.

“With the words she has personally caused to be recorded, I in her behalf, present you with the banner of the Red Cross, which you are to place high above the capitol, that all may recognize the place of your merciful and patriotic labors, and the deep heartfelt sympathy and practical assistance of Her Majesty, Liliuokalani.”

Col. C. P. Iaukea, secretary of the queen, then handed over the big banner to Mrs. Damon, who received it on behalf of her coworkers.

“It is a great honor to receive this flag on behalf of the Allied War Relief Auxiliary and the Red Cross workers of Hawaii,” said Mrs. Damon. We wish to thank you, Governor Pinkham, for letting it be displayed on the executive building as a symbol of loyalty and service to the cause of America.

“In 1864 fourteen governments and six societies acknowledged the Red Cross flag as an emblem to be used in the care of the sick and wounded, and the flag is now displayed by all nations and societies as token of this. The first Red Cross banner was raised in 1881 at Washington, District of Columbia, and in 1900 by congressional act was given official recognition.”

When Mrs. Damon had finished the flag was placed on the halyards and she raised it so that the breezes caught and unfolded it in the sunlight. After today it will be taken down and kept in the throne room as a token of Queen Liliuokalani’s generous heartedness.

Beginning today the throne room in the capitol building will be kept open on Friday afternoons to give opportunity for service to those women who cannot come for Red Cross work in the mornings.

Mrs. Henry F. Damon of the Allied War Relief Auxiliary said today that this is in the nature of an experiment and will be kept up only if the attendance on Friday afternoons warrants it. There have been a number of requests to keep the rooms open during some afternoons, and Friday has accordingly been selected.

THE QUEEN’S LETTER

Hon. Lucius E. Pinkham,

Governor of Hawaii.

Dear Sir: It affords me much pleasure in handing you a Red Cross flag, with the request that it be presented to the ladies of the Allied War Relief Auxiliary of the Honolulu, Hawaii, Chapter of the American Red Cross, as an expression of my warm and hearty sympathy with the cause of humanity and an abiding faith in the work of the patriotic women of Hawaii.

In presenting this emblem of the Red Cross, may I suggest that it be first displayed over the executive building so that all who may see it may be reminded of their patriotic duty and know that beneath its folds, in the throne room of Iolani palace, sit a group of silent workers giving of their time and untiring effort in the work of alleviation and mercy?

Very sincerely,

(Signed) LILIUOKALANI.

(Honolulu Star-Bulletin, 9/14/1917, p. 3)

Red Cross Flag, Gift of Queen, Flies From Hawaii's Capitol

Honolulu Star-Bulletin, Volume XXV, Number 7932, Page 3. September 14, 1917.

Always important to look at sources. 1893 / 2012.

HAWAII ESCAPES FROM JAPAN.

The raising of the American flag over Hawaii is one of the greatest things done that cannot be repaid. It blocks the nation of Japan from establishing its rule over Hawaii. When the warship Naniwa arrived here, it was clear that if the American flag was not waving over Aliiolani Hale, then the Japanese flag would have been put in its place. And then they would have returned the Queen and the Japanese would have been supplied with weapons and took Hawaii for Japan. It all would have happened if the Boston did not hold them off. But when they saw the American flag raised, they were afraid to do this, for it would be fighting with the United States of America.

Perhaps now Liliuokalani’s attendants are hoping that by the taking down of the American flag, the Japanese will be free to come and return the alii to the throne under the Japanese flag. Should that be the thought of some of them, they are gravely mistaken.

The American troops will save Hawaii from the interference by the other powers. When Japan tries to foment something of that sort, that will be when the soldiers of America will be deployed again. This has been announced to the Commissioner and the captain of the Naniwa. They will not start a war with America without it being proclaimed in advance by the Emperor of Japan. Japan has no desire to war against America because of the dispute over Hawaii. There is nothing to fear.

America will not interfere in the local government of Hawaii nei, however it will guard Hawaii with force against the entering of other national powers into this Archipelago.

[It is always important to look at what newspaper an article comes from. Also, long-running newspapers (and people for that matter) don’t necessarily keep their same ideologies throughout their entire life…]

(Kuokoa, 4/8/1893, p. 2)

UA PAKELE HAWAII MAI IA IAPANA.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXXII, Helu 14, Aoao 2. Aperila 8, 1893.

Even more from Ka Nonanona, August 8, 1843.

TRAITORS.

When we reached the residence of the king, at Honukaopu [Honokaupu ?], Kekuanaoa fetched some traitors who were kept at Hale Kauila; perhaps there were 140 of them. The king did not allow them to accompany him to raise the flag.

This is the nature of their treason. When this archipelago was not clearly under Capt. Lord George Paulet, they left Kamehameha III, and they swore allegiance to the Queen of Britain. This is probably the reason they swore allegiance to Victoria; because they were paid money. They therefore curried his favor [hoopilimeaai].

They were probably prepared to go with George to this war and that; if he warred against the king, so too would they; and if he went to war against the local haole or the Missionaries, they would fight as well! If soldiers of enlightened lands took an oath in this fashion, their heads would fall. But because of the patience and goodness of Kamehameha III, they were saved.

When they came in the presence of the king, they gave a three gun salute to Hawaii’s flag; and they swore once again to live obediently beneath Kamehameha III. After that, they spent time with the King, and shook hands.

(Nonanona, 8/8/1843, pp. 25 & 26.)

POE KIPI.

Ka Nonanona, Buke 3, Pepa 6, Aoao 25. Augate 8, 1843.

Wahine o Beritania...

Ka Nonanona, Buke 3, Pepa 6, Aoao 26. Augate 8, 1843.

More from Ka Nonanona, August 8, 1843.

THE RESTORATION OF THE KINGDOM.

How great are the blessings of Kamehameha III and his subjects now, for the difficulties have subsided and the sovereignty of the land has been restored. No more is the living as subjects under the men of Victoria.

Kamehameha III is now the monarch of Hawaii nei. The British flag has been taken down on this day, July 31, 1843, and Hawaii’s flag has been raised once more. Therefore, this will be the day of the year that will be commemorated with joy from here forth.

Here is an awesome event that happened today. At half past eight, Admiral Thomas went along with some sailors, from the three British ships (anchored at Honolulu now) to the fort of Honolulu at Kulaokahua, with large and small firearms, and spears, and there he awaited the king. At 10 o’clock, the king went with his soldiers, and arrived; the Hawaiian flag was unfurled, the British flag was taken down from the fort, and there the Hawaiian flag was raised, and so too in uplands, on the hill of Puawaina [Punchbowl]; many guns were shot off in salute all over: The soldiers did it, the warships as well, the forts as well, and the hill of Puawaina as well, and the whaling ships as well; and the bells were rung. The warships were festooned with flags; it was a fine and beautiful sight to see.

There were many people gathered to witness this amazing event, perhaps there were ten thousand in total. The soldiers carried out their duties well; they circled the king twice, while saluting him; they shot off their guns many times and marched here and there quickly and smartly. And when they were done, the crowd all returned to town.

(Nonanona, 8/8/1843, p. 25)

KA HOIHOI ANA O KE AUPUNI.

Ka Nonanona, Buke 3, Pepa 6, Aoao 25. Augate 8, 1843.

The first newspaper article printed following July 31, 1843.

BATTLESHIP.

On the 26th of July, the British Warship named Dublin arrived. Rear Admiral Thomas is the Captain. He is the officer in charge of all of the British warships in the Pacific Ocean.

When he received documents pertaining to Capt. Lord George Paulet aboard Victoria’s ship, and he heard clearly that the British flag was raised over these islands, he came quickly to restore the government to Kamehameha III. How fine is his aloha for the king, isn’t it! and for the citizens as well.

(Nonanona, 8/8/1843, p. 25)

MOKU MANUWA.

Ka Nonanona, Buke 3, Pepa 6, Aoao 25. Augate 8, 1843.