What Maialoha is said to have written in English which he supposedly did not speak, 1904.

LEPERS CALL THE PINKHAM ENDORSEMENT A HUMBUG

That fishy wireless from Kalaupapa which arrived here the day Pinkham expected to be reappointed, announcing his endorsement by the lepers of the Settlement, has brought the following repudiation. it now looks as if the “endorsement” had been a put-up job between Pinkham and one of his subordinates with the intent to deceive the Governor:

To Mrs. Atcherley:

Having received work by mail of last week to this effect: That we, the leper inmates of Kalaupapa did meet and appoint a committee to extend by wireless our hearty endorsement to the Governor for the reappointment of L. E. Pinkham, Esq. as president of the Board of Health, on the 18th day of April, 1908,

Therefore, We, the undersigned lepers residing in the County of Kalawao, hereby wish the truth to be publicly announced, that there was, and has never been a meeting held here at Kalaupapa for such purpose on the date mentioned or any other date thereof.

Be it further announced, That Mr. Pinkham’s removal from that office receives our hearty approval.

(Signed) K. Naholoholo, J. Uha, K. Kapaa, William Noa Keama, David Ilihia, Kaele, Kaaukai, Hale Kauhola, H. Brown, George McLane, David Pauahi, Paahao, A. M. Koloa, Kalei, Eddie Naukana, John Naluai, S. K. Maialoha, John Taylor Unea. Continue reading

Pardons granted by Governor Pinkham, 1915.

GOVERNOR PARDONED A PRISONER.

This past Friday, Governor Pinkham forgave the punishment of a prisoner, and released for good five convicts from their imprisonment at Kawa.

The one who was pardoned was George Kealoha. He was found guilty on the 10th of this past month, November, for injuring a soldier, and the sentence he received from Judge Ashford was one year in prison.

From what was said, the reason for that the Governor ended the sentence of George Kealoha was because of a plea put before him, and in this document, it said that the wife of George Kealoha was very close to giving birth, and therefore, the Governor listened and signed his name to a document to end the sentence of that Hawaiian man.

Because of the many prisoners, they were released by the Governor; they were people who were imprisoned for some years but yet did not serve out their sentence.

(Kuokoa, 3/5/1915, p. 1)

HOOKUU KE KIAAINA I KEKAHI PAAHAO.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LIII, Helu 10, Aoao 1. Maraki 5, 1915.

Hawaiians slighted? 1914.

THE CONTEMPT FOR HAWAIIANS IS CLEAR

Honolulu, Apr. 17—We hear from the word that is buzzing on the streets that Palmer Woods [Pama Woods] has been selected as Land Commissioner [Lunaaina] for the Territory of Hawaii in place of Joshua D. Tucker [Iosua D. Tucker], and Sheriff Jarrett [Makai nui Jarrett] in place of High Sheriff Henry [Makai Kiekie Hanale]. The reason for this decision by the Governor to select Palmer Woods for this position was because of the objection by the United States Attorney from Tennessee to select a Hawaiian in a position under the Federal Government, although the Governor wanted to appoint Palmer Woods as Marshall [Ilamuku] in place of Hendry. The people of the state of Tennessee are infamous for their contempt of people of dark skin, and perhaps that is one reason that place does not desire Native Hawaiians. Through this we should recognize the nature of the Democrats in America, as this sort of action creeps all the way here to Hawaii nei.

[For some reason, the first 11 and a half years of Hoku o Hawaii (including the issue in which you can find this article) is not available yet online!]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 4/23/1914, p. 3)

AKAAKA KA HOOKAE HAWAII

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke 8, Helu 46, Aoao 3. Aperila 23, 1914.

And yet another on Liliu and the Red Cross, 1917.

Red Cross Flag, Gift of Queen, Flies From Hawaii’s Capitol

Governor Presents Emblem On Behalf of Liliuokalani

Governor Pinkham presenting Red Cross flag this morning. Col. Iaukea, the queen’s secretary, is seen holding the flag.

‘LET ALL WHO SEE IT BE REMINDED OF PATRIOTIC DUTY’ SAYS HER MAJESTY

FOR the first time in history a Red Cross flag was raised today over the territorial capitol, former palace of Hawaii. The flag is the gift of Queen Liliuokalani, and it was at her request that it was first displayed from the staff on the executive building.

In an impressive ceremony held at 10 o’clock this morning Governor Pinkham presented the flag on behalf of the Queen to the Allied War Relief Auxiliary and the Red Cross workers of Hawaii.

Mrs. Henry F. Damon, president of the auxiliary, received the flag and hoisted it to the breezes. The ceremony was held on the mauka steps of the capitol, fully 50 women and a number of men gathering for it. A generous clapping of hands greeted the banner as it opened against a clear background of blue sky and in the bright gleam of a morning sun.

After reading the queen’s letter, in which she presented the flag to the Red Cross workers, Governor Pinkham said:

“Women of the Red Cross:

“You are gathered here to receive from Her Majesty Ex-Queen Liliuokalani, her gift of the emblem of Universal Humanity, that you may raise it above your labors in behalf of those your countrymen and their allies, who with devotion to the very limit of suffering and death, offer themselves in this struggle for universal democracy.

“Your work of alleviation of suffering has touched the heart of Her Majesty and those in authority from the President of the United STates to those on her own island home and her friends, who now know of her deep personal interest, for it has been manifested in every way within her power.

“With the words she has personally caused to be recorded, I in her behalf, present you with the banner of the Red Cross, which you are to place high above the capitol, that all may recognize the place of your merciful and patriotic labors, and the deep heartfelt sympathy and practical assistance of Her Majesty, Liliuokalani.”

Col. C. P. Iaukea, secretary of the queen, then handed over the big banner to Mrs. Damon, who received it on behalf of her coworkers.

“It is a great honor to receive this flag on behalf of the Allied War Relief Auxiliary and the Red Cross workers of Hawaii,” said Mrs. Damon. We wish to thank you, Governor Pinkham, for letting it be displayed on the executive building as a symbol of loyalty and service to the cause of America.

“In 1864 fourteen governments and six societies acknowledged the Red Cross flag as an emblem to be used in the care of the sick and wounded, and the flag is now displayed by all nations and societies as token of this. The first Red Cross banner was raised in 1881 at Washington, District of Columbia, and in 1900 by congressional act was given official recognition.”

When Mrs. Damon had finished the flag was placed on the halyards and she raised it so that the breezes caught and unfolded it in the sunlight. After today it will be taken down and kept in the throne room as a token of Queen Liliuokalani’s generous heartedness.

Beginning today the throne room in the capitol building will be kept open on Friday afternoons to give opportunity for service to those women who cannot come for Red Cross work in the mornings.

Mrs. Henry F. Damon of the Allied War Relief Auxiliary said today that this is in the nature of an experiment and will be kept up only if the attendance on Friday afternoons warrants it. There have been a number of requests to keep the rooms open during some afternoons, and Friday has accordingly been selected.

THE QUEEN’S LETTER

Hon. Lucius E. Pinkham,

Governor of Hawaii.

Dear Sir: It affords me much pleasure in handing you a Red Cross flag, with the request that it be presented to the ladies of the Allied War Relief Auxiliary of the Honolulu, Hawaii, Chapter of the American Red Cross, as an expression of my warm and hearty sympathy with the cause of humanity and an abiding faith in the work of the patriotic women of Hawaii.

In presenting this emblem of the Red Cross, may I suggest that it be first displayed over the executive building so that all who may see it may be reminded of their patriotic duty and know that beneath its folds, in the throne room of Iolani palace, sit a group of silent workers giving of their time and untiring effort in the work of alleviation and mercy?

Very sincerely,

(Signed) LILIUOKALANI.

(Honolulu Star-Bulletin, 9/14/1917, p. 3)

Red Cross Flag, Gift of Queen, Flies From Hawaii's Capitol

Honolulu Star-Bulletin, Volume XXV, Number 7932, Page 3. September 14, 1917.

Queen Liliuokalani and the Red Cross, 1917.

THE WHITE HOUSE

WASHINGTON

U. S. S. MAYFLOWER

12 September, 1917

My dear Mr. Secretary:

Thank you for your letter of September sixth enclosing the letter from Governor Pinkham and the letter from Queen Liliuokalani.

Will you not take early occasion to request Governor Pinkham to express to Queen Liliuokalani my personal appreciation of her generous contributions to the Red Cross?

Cordially and sincerely yours,

[signed] Woodrow Wilson

Hon. Franklin K. Lane,

Secretary of the Interior.

(A letter of appreciation from President Woodrow Wilson to Queen Liliuokalani, for her assistance to the Red Cross.)

[The Queen dies just two months later on November 11th…]

(Kuokoa, 9/28/1917, p. 2)

THE WHITE HOUSE

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LV, Helu 39, Aoao 2. Sepatemaba 28, 1917.