A mele for Lunalilo Home by historian George Pooloa, 1928.

A MORSEL FROM LUNALILO HOME

Mr. Jonah Kumalae,

Aloha Oe:—Please allow me some open space of your precious, Ke Alakai o Hawaii, for a while.

The one named Chief William Charles Lunalilo was the sixth of the kings, chosen by Hawaii nei on the 8th of January, in the year 1873, and he reigned as king over the nation of Hawaii nei. And after one year and twenty-five days, he died on the 3rd of February, in the year 1874, at Iolani Palace, mauka of King Street. The one named Chief William Charles Lunalilo, was the one who was very generous, willing the trustees of his estate to give from his property in the crown lands for Lunalilo Home as a home for his own Hawaiian people to live in peace for all times at Makiki; Captain Harry Swinton [Hale Pinao] was appointed superintendent of Lunalilo Home, a man who was a well known to the multitudes, and after him there were five haole, and with the last, Lunalilo Home was razed, and the land lay barren. Continue reading

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Stephen Parker Waipa for Sheriff, 1928.

Stephen Parker Waipa

FOR YOUR SHERIFF

I am the son of Captain Robert Parker Waipa. I served in the police force in various positions under A. M. Brown for 19 years and under Colonel Curtis Piehu Iaukea for two years, and was let go when William P. Jarrett became Sheriff because we are of different political parties.

I served in the armed forces of Hawaii from the rank of soldier to sergeant.

Currently, I am an inspector for the Mutual Telephone Company and worked for that organization for thirteen years.

I have faith that because of all the different things I know, that I am fully qualified to serve as the sheriff of this county, while being able to carry out all the duties of this office promptly, fairly, righteously, and intelligently, so that our beloved county can have peace.

Don’t forget to give your ballots to me so that peace can reside in our land.

(Alakai o Hawaii, 10/4/1928, p. 2)

Stephen Parker Waipa

Ke Alakai o Hawaii, Buke 1, Helu 23, Aoao 2. Okatoba 4, 1928.

Hawaiians slighted? 1914.

THE CONTEMPT FOR HAWAIIANS IS CLEAR

Honolulu, Apr. 17—We hear from the word that is buzzing on the streets that Palmer Woods [Pama Woods] has been selected as Land Commissioner [Lunaaina] for the Territory of Hawaii in place of Joshua D. Tucker [Iosua D. Tucker], and Sheriff Jarrett [Makai nui Jarrett] in place of High Sheriff Henry [Makai Kiekie Hanale]. The reason for this decision by the Governor to select Palmer Woods for this position was because of the objection by the United States Attorney from Tennessee to select a Hawaiian in a position under the Federal Government, although the Governor wanted to appoint Palmer Woods as Marshall [Ilamuku] in place of Hendry. The people of the state of Tennessee are infamous for their contempt of people of dark skin, and perhaps that is one reason that place does not desire Native Hawaiians. Through this we should recognize the nature of the Democrats in America, as this sort of action creeps all the way here to Hawaii nei.

[For some reason, the first 11 and a half years of Hoku o Hawaii (including the issue in which you can find this article) is not available yet online!]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 4/23/1914, p. 3)

AKAAKA KA HOOKAE HAWAII

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke 8, Helu 46, Aoao 3. Aperila 23, 1914.