What Maialoha is said to have written in English which he supposedly did not speak, 1904.

LEPERS CALL THE PINKHAM ENDORSEMENT A HUMBUG

That fishy wireless from Kalaupapa which arrived here the day Pinkham expected to be reappointed, announcing his endorsement by the lepers of the Settlement, has brought the following repudiation. it now looks as if the “endorsement” had been a put-up job between Pinkham and one of his subordinates with the intent to deceive the Governor:

To Mrs. Atcherley:

Having received work by mail of last week to this effect: That we, the leper inmates of Kalaupapa did meet and appoint a committee to extend by wireless our hearty endorsement to the Governor for the reappointment of L. E. Pinkham, Esq. as president of the Board of Health, on the 18th day of April, 1908,

Therefore, We, the undersigned lepers residing in the County of Kalawao, hereby wish the truth to be publicly announced, that there was, and has never been a meeting held here at Kalaupapa for such purpose on the date mentioned or any other date thereof.

Be it further announced, That Mr. Pinkham’s removal from that office receives our hearty approval.

(Signed) K. Naholoholo, J. Uha, K. Kapaa, William Noa Keama, David Ilihia, Kaele, Kaaukai, Hale Kauhola, H. Brown, George McLane, David Pauahi, Paahao, A. M. Koloa, Kalei, Eddie Naukana, John Naluai, S. K. Maialoha, John Taylor Unea. Continue reading

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For those who believe anything on Facebook. 1908.

That letter from Kalawao.

The English article that was printed in one of the English newspapers of Honolulu nei, from S. K. Maialoha of Kalawao, Molokai, is clear to the editor of this paper, that it is not a letter written in English by S. K. Maialoha, because the editor of this paper is familiar with S. K. Maialoha, and he is not someone skilled in English. Continue reading

S. K. Maialoha sent to Kalaupapa, 1905.

LEAVES THE LAND

SEES THE LAND OF SUFFERING AS A STRANGER.

O Swift Messenger of the communities of Hawaii, floating all the way foreign lands, Ke Aloha Aina Newspaper. Greetings:—

On the 12th of this September, in the morning hours, there was crying as people walked outside of the grounds of that hallowed castle, and at 8 o’clock or so was when our belongings were readied. The wailing was heard of women for their husbands, men for their wives, parents for their children, children for their parents, family for family.

And at 11 o’clock, the patients were called to board the car; a veil was spread, and people could no more see us; the cars left the grounds, and great mourning was heard; your writer saw his dear mama and our child for the last time; and the writer heard the calling of my beloved Ape, “O Papa, come back to me.” Continue reading

The latest from Kalawao, 1909.

News From the Land of the Suffering.

To the Editor of the Aloha Aina Newspaper, Aloha:

Please allow my small parcel a space in your newspaper which is greatly enjoyed, and that is what is down below; let the paper take it proudly around so that our multitudes of friends may see.

Movies come regularly every Wednesday, and are shown on the evenings of Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday; and every Saturday in Honolulu. There has been a building erected for the patients to watch the movies. The patients are thrilled. They donated money to buy a first-class phonograph [pahu olelo]. They are very happy with singing, the sweet sound of the strings and the blare of the brass instruments.

There was an announcement made to the ones without the sickness or those partially afflicted that wanted to be examined by the Doctors who are coming into the settlement.

Some went to sign up, and some just looked on because they did not want to go back to where they came from, being there might be difficulties waiting ahead for them. And because of the small number of those going to sign up, the Superintendent of the settlement ordered someone to go to the houses to sign people up; the total of those people number 58, but I don’t have their names; the only names I have are those who went to sign up, and they number 55, along with their doctor.

THE PEOPLE WHOSE DOCTOR IS DR. WAYSON

[Names difficult to make out.]

THE PEOPLE WHOSE DOCTOR IS DR. GOODHUE.

The Men

[Names difficult to make out.]

The Women

[Names difficult to make out.]

The total number told to the writer is 108. This includes the people chosen by the Legislature [?]

With much aloha for my Lahui.

Sincerely,

S. K. MAIALOHA.

Kalawao, Molokai, Aug. 2, 1909

[Here is just another example of why the original newspapers need to be reshot clearly before the acid in the paper consumes all of the words, leaving us with crumbs…]

(Aloha Aina, 9/4/1909, p. 3)

Na Mea Hou o ke Kahua Ma'i.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke XIV, Helu 36, Aoao 3. Sepatemaba 4, 1909.