What Maialoha is said to have written in English which he supposedly did not speak, 1904.

LEPERS CALL THE PINKHAM ENDORSEMENT A HUMBUG

That fishy wireless from Kalaupapa which arrived here the day Pinkham expected to be reappointed, announcing his endorsement by the lepers of the Settlement, has brought the following repudiation. it now looks as if the “endorsement” had been a put-up job between Pinkham and one of his subordinates with the intent to deceive the Governor:

To Mrs. Atcherley:

Having received work by mail of last week to this effect: That we, the leper inmates of Kalaupapa did meet and appoint a committee to extend by wireless our hearty endorsement to the Governor for the reappointment of L. E. Pinkham, Esq. as president of the Board of Health, on the 18th day of April, 1908,

Therefore, We, the undersigned lepers residing in the County of Kalawao, hereby wish the truth to be publicly announced, that there was, and has never been a meeting held here at Kalaupapa for such purpose on the date mentioned or any other date thereof.

Be it further announced, That Mr. Pinkham’s removal from that office receives our hearty approval.

(Signed) K. Naholoholo, J. Uha, K. Kapaa, William Noa Keama, David Ilihia, Kaele, Kaaukai, Hale Kauhola, H. Brown, George McLane, David Pauahi, Paahao, A. M. Koloa, Kalei, Eddie Naukana, John Naluai, S. K. Maialoha, John Taylor Unea. Continue reading

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Kalaupapa a hundred years ago, 1912.

NEWS FROM KALAUPAPA, MOLOKAI.

The S. S. Mikahala arrived yesterday, and turned around full of cargo for this port, and at Kaunakakai it put ashore the pai ai [pa‘i ‘ai], and most of the items will perhaps arrive the following week. The kokua went upside to Kaunakakai with the donkeys to fetch the pai ai yesterday evening, and last night the provision donkeys arrived, and this morning they left again for the remaining pai ai. The reason that that S. S. Mikahala could not land her cargo was because of the rough seas surrounding us; there was no harbor, only ocean, and the waves spreading across shore were towering, but an amazing thing was the request by the Vice Superintendent and Doctor W. J. Goodhue for the children and their skiff of the H. H. K. L. [?] and this request was granted.

Dr. W. J. Goodhue got on, along with the stout boys of the H. H. K. L. and they rowed out to try and get the Mikahala to throw over the pai ai to them; the amazing thing I spoke of was when the skiff came into view and before them was a huge wave, and that was when everyone held their breath, because it was as if the boat and the brave ones aboard would be pulled down, however with the blink of an eye, the skiff arrived triumphantly outside without harm, and Dr. W. J. Goodhue was seen waving his handkerchief to the people on land. And to Mr. Paahao, the helmsman went the people’s appreciation, because it was his steering that they faced the powerful waves and came out like a man-eating shark speeding atop the sparkling [hulala?] billows of the sea; and admiration also went to the boys who rowed, being that it was their strength which helped the helmsman greatly. This is just some news.

I understand that you sent the Calendars and they came, but there they go back again, and maybe we will get them next week.

There is a much Rain and strong Kona winds blowing, from last week until today, and it is this wind that caused the rough seas, and the rough seas are bringing up great rocks [aa?] and depositing them upland.

William Notley
Kalaupapa, Molokai, Feb. 2, 1912.

(Kuokoa Home Rula, 2/9/1912, p. 1)

NA MEA HOU O KALAUPAPA MOLOKAI.

Kuokoa Home Rula, Buke X, Helu 6, Aoao 1. Feberuari 9, 1912.