Waianuenue coverage, 1896.

[Found under: “KELA A ME KEIA.”]

From the sugar plantation of Kealia, Kauai, Continue reading

Ship passenger list, 1893.

Passengers.

For Kahului, per stmr Lehua, Jan 18—Hon J Anderson, E H Bailey,W Goodale.

For San Francisco, per S S Claudine, Jan 19—Hon L A Thurston, Hon W C Wilder, Hon J Marsden, W R Castle, C L Carter, Dr F R Day, C F Peterson and one other.

For Kauai, per stmr Mikahala, Jan 18—Mrs W H Rice and 2 children, Miss McBryde, Mrs D Smith, T Osaki, C Y Atong, Mr Hamm, Hon A S Wilcox, Hon G N Wilcox, Hon A McBryde, C Christian, T Lille and 30 deck.

(Daily Bulletin, 1/19/1893, p. 3)

DailyBulletin_1_19_1893_3

The Daily Bulletin, Volume  V, Number 628, Page 3. January 19, 1893.

Louis Haagen to Kalaupapa, 1921.

ASKS CITIZENSHIP AND DEPARTS FOR KALAUPAPA

Louis Haagen, a Catholic brother, has declared in the office of the clerk of the United States district court his intention of becoming an American citizen. Brother Louis arrived in Honolulu several weeks ago from Belgium. He is 26 years old, was born at Poppel, Belgium, and was in the thick of the great World War from start to finish. Brother Louis left by the Mikahala for Molokai Settlement to join the staff of the Catholic Mission at Kalaupapa, where he will devote his life to caring for the inmates of the settlement.

(Maui News, 1/14/1921, p. 6)

ASKS CITIZENSHIP AND DEPARTS FOR KALAUPAPA

The Maui News, 21st Year, Number 1087, Page 6. January 14, 1921.

The new steamship, the Mikahala, 1887.

The New Steamship.

This Wednesday, the new steamer of Foster [Poka] and company arrived; 8 days from San Francisco. “Mikahala” is its name, and it was named after the name of Mrs. J. Robinson, the wife of James [Kimo] of Pakaka. It is a large vessel like the Lilinoe, and it is speedy. We hear that it is headed for Kauai in the coming days. We do not know who the Captain is.

(Nupepa Elele, 1/15/1887, p. 2)

Ka Mokuahi Hou.

Ka Nupepa Elele, Buke VIII, Helu 29, Aoao 2. Ianuari 15, 1887.

Mikahala collides into the Mary E. Foster, 1894.

A SCHOONER WRECKED AT SEA.

The Steamer Mikahala Cuts Off the Stern of an Island Vessel.

THE MARY E. FOSTER OUT OF SIGHT.

The Vessels Meet At Midnight In the Channel—The Disaster Is Said to be Due to a Mates Negligence—No Lives Lost By the Unfortunate Accident.

On last Tuesday, about midnight, the steamer Mikahala and the schooner Mary E. Foster collided in the channel between Kauai and this island. The bow of the steamer struck the port side of the schooner, near the stern, and cut off the end as neatly as if it had been done by a saw. The schooner began to settle at once, and at the end of three-quarters of an hour she sank completely out of sight. Captain Hipa and the crew of the Mary E. Foster were taken on board of the Mikahala and carried as far as Koloa, where they were picked up by the Iwalani and returned to this port.

The particulars of the disaster are about as follows: The Mikahala left this port for Kauai and Niihau. The…

THE I. I. S. N. CO.’s STEAMER MIKAHALA.
(From a Photograph.)

…weather was favorable, and the moon was shining. At midnight Captain Haglund came on deck, as it was the hour for changing the watch. He went aft first, and when returned forward he noticed a sail right ahead of the steamer. He jumped into the wheel-house and turned the helm in order to avoid a collision, but the vessel did not answer her helm quickly enough, and the bow of the steamer crashed into the vessel. The second mate was on watch at the time, and it will be a difficult matter for him to prove that the collision was not his fault. His excuse is said to be that the foresail was up and interfered with his sight. Then another story is, that he thought the vessel which was bearing down on him was the James Makee or some other island steamer, and he did not think it was necessary to shift the helm. As soon as the schooner was struck, her cabin and hold rapidly filled with water, and it was but the work of a few moments to drop a boat into which the crew bundled and pulled for the Mikahala. Captain Hipa remained on his vessel until the last moment, and did not leave until Captain Haglund assured him that his schooner would go to the bottom of the sea.

Captain Hipa made an effort to get out of the way of the steamer but the wind was not heavy enough at the time, and while his vessel was sailing at an angle with the steamer she was struck. If he…

THE MARY E. FOSTER.
(The cross marks the place where the bow of the Mikahala struck the illfated schooner.)

…had had thirty seconds more time he would have cleared himself and the collision would not have occurred. The schooner had 1400 bags of sugar on board which is said to be insured.

The Mary E. Foster was built in 1877 at Port Ludlow. She was ninety tons register and was valued at $5000. For years she has been running between here and Kauai taking coal to different plantations on that island and returning with sugar. Her captain is considered a good seaman and no blame is attached to him for the disaster, as a sailing vessel has the right of way on the high seas, and it was the duty of the second mate in charge of the steamer to steer clear of the schooner. Captain Haglund will return to port tomorrow morning when a full account of the collision will be obtained.

(Pacific Commercial Advertiser, 5/26/1894, p. 3)

A SCHOONER WRECKED AT SEA.

The Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume XIX, Number 3698, Page 3. May 26, 1894.

Another mele for Sweet Emalia? 1895.

NO SWEET EMALIE.

KA U’I MAALO I KE KUPULAU.

Aloha Niumalu i ka Uluwehi
Kamaile laulii ku pohai
E hai mai ana ia’u i ka lohe
A ka Poano no ka Mikahala

Hiki aku i ke awa Nawiliwili
Kulu pakahi iho ku’u Waimaka
Aloha no oe e Mailekini
Olali a o na pali Nihoniho

E hoi no au a manao mai
Aia i Huleia ku’u lei nani
Poina aku au i ku’u Rose
Me ka manu inu wai pua o Lehua

No Lehua ka makani anu nei kino
Kahuli leo hone o ka Hanehane
Aneane neau a e lalau
A e noho Kapena no ka Mikahala

Ilaila ku’u upu ku’u lia ana
A he nane huna ia na kamanao
Hainaia mai ana ku’u nane
No ka U-i i maalo i ke Kupulau.

Hakuia e

G. R. K. Penigula.

Ewa, Augate 2, 1895.

(Oiaio, 8/16/1895, p. 1)

NO SWEET EMALIE.

Nupepa Ka Oiaio, Buke VII, Helu 24, Aoao 1. Augate 16, 1895.

Still more on the Makee, the Malulani, and a reminder on naming, 1897.

[Found under: “ALL ALONG THE DOCKS”]

While leaving Kapaa at 2:30 Wednesday the James Makee was blown ashore. The W. G. Hall went to her assistance and, after lightering, the vessel was taken off three hours later. Part of the keel was torn off; two knees and one beam split; part of the anchor stock stuck through the vessel three feel below water. The Mikahala escorted the Makee to port.

[It is good to at least be aware that many times, Hawaiians called things (boat, for instance) a different name from what it was called in English. Here you see the W. G. Hall mentioned. It might sound more familiar to you as the Malulani.

Spelling is also varied in Hawaiian on occasion. You would expect in the Hawaiian-Language Newspapers, the James Makee to be written Kimo Maki (which it is at times), but it is also seen as Kimo Makee, James Maki, and James Makee as well! On a somewhat related note, Ena Road in Waikiki is not pronounced like “ena” as is so often heard today from the youngsters, but it is pronounced like “ina” and refers to the old-time Ing Family. So you will see in the Hawaiian-Language Newspapers, John Ena, John Ina, Keoni Ena, Keoni Ina…

I would like to see an easy online reference done for English/Hawaiian name variants done!]

(Hawaiian Star, 1/2/1897, p. 2)

While leaving Kapaa at 2:30...

The Hawaiian Star, Volume III, Number 1160, Page 2. January 2, 1897.