More on the Makee, 1897.

JAMES MAKEE AGROUND.

Accident to One of the Inter-Island Boats at Kapaa.

The James Makee met with a streak of misfortune on her last trip to Kauai. She was leaving Kapaa about 2:30 p. m. on Wednesday with 650 bags of sugar on board. The wind was blowing a perfect gale, and the Makee was blown upon the knuckle, sticking fast.

The W. G. Hall¹ came over from Koloa to the assistance of the Makee.

Capt. Peterson gave orders to have the sugar discharged. Something over 200 bags was put into the W. G. Hall and the rest was taken back to Kapaa.

The Makee had her stern lightened, and she swung around into deep water about 5 p. m. Five hours later she had all her cargo out, and she slid off with her keel very badly damaged.

The Makee left for Koloa at 8:30 a. m. on Thursday and arrived in Hanamaulu at 7:30 p. m. same day. Here she met the Mikahala and the two came to Honolulu together.

¹The W. G. Hall was also known as Malulani.

(Hawaiian Gazette, 1/5/1897, p. 5)

JAMES MAKEE AGROUND.

The Hawaiian Gazette, Volume XXXII, Number 2, Page 5. January 5, 1897.

Kalaupapa a hundred years ago, 1912.

NEWS FROM KALAUPAPA, MOLOKAI.

The S. S. Mikahala arrived yesterday, and turned around full of cargo for this port, and at Kaunakakai it put ashore the pai ai [pa‘i ‘ai], and most of the items will perhaps arrive the following week. The kokua went upside to Kaunakakai with the donkeys to fetch the pai ai yesterday evening, and last night the provision donkeys arrived, and this morning they left again for the remaining pai ai. The reason that that S. S. Mikahala could not land her cargo was because of the rough seas surrounding us; there was no harbor, only ocean, and the waves spreading across shore were towering, but an amazing thing was the request by the Vice Superintendent and Doctor W. J. Goodhue for the children and their skiff of the H. H. K. L. [?] and this request was granted.

Dr. W. J. Goodhue got on, along with the stout boys of the H. H. K. L. and they rowed out to try and get the Mikahala to throw over the pai ai to them; the amazing thing I spoke of was when the skiff came into view and before them was a huge wave, and that was when everyone held their breath, because it was as if the boat and the brave ones aboard would be pulled down, however with the blink of an eye, the skiff arrived triumphantly outside without harm, and Dr. W. J. Goodhue was seen waving his handkerchief to the people on land. And to Mr. Paahao, the helmsman went the people’s appreciation, because it was his steering that they faced the powerful waves and came out like a man-eating shark speeding atop the sparkling [hulala?] billows of the sea; and admiration also went to the boys who rowed, being that it was their strength which helped the helmsman greatly. This is just some news.

I understand that you sent the Calendars and they came, but there they go back again, and maybe we will get them next week.

There is a much Rain and strong Kona winds blowing, from last week until today, and it is this wind that caused the rough seas, and the rough seas are bringing up great rocks [aa?] and depositing them upland.

William Notley
Kalaupapa, Molokai, Feb. 2, 1912.

(Kuokoa Home Rula, 2/9/1912, p. 1)

NA MEA HOU O KALAUPAPA MOLOKAI.

Kuokoa Home Rula, Buke X, Helu 6, Aoao 1. Feberuari 9, 1912.