Opeapea from Hilea, 1887.

AN INTERESTING SPECIMEN.

By the W. G. Hall of last Wednesday, Mr. F. L. Clarke received from Mr. C. N. Spencer, of Hilea, a good specimen of a Hawaiian bat. The native name is “Opeapea” or “Olepe.” The specimen sent measures 6 inches from tip to tip of the extended wings. The body is about the size of that of a mouse. The ears are quite large in proportion to the head. The profile to the little fellow shows a “snub” nose, retreating forehead and wide mouth, in fact, it may be called an “ugly mug.” The specimen is preserved in alcohol, and will be placed in the National Museum.

(Daily Bulletin, 2/17/1887, p. 2)

AN INTERESTING SPECIMEN.

The Daily Bulletin, Volume XI, Number 1562, Page 2. February 17, 1887.

Advertisements

The Mikahala arrives in Honolulu, 1887.

THE NEW STEAMSHIP ‘MIKAHALA.’

At 10 o’clock a.m. of Wednesday, January 12,  the steamer replacing the Paeli, which ran aground off Niihau, of the Inter-Island Steam Navigation Company [Hui Hooholo Mokuahi Pili Aina], named the Mikahala and captained by Captain B. B. Hampstead, arrived at Honolulu Harbor, reaching here in 8 days and 20 hours.

This new steamship was built in Port Blakely by the ship builders, the Hall Brothers. And from here, she was sent using a sail to San Francisco, where the machinery and steam engine of the Paeli was salvaged and waited to be laid out in her wide belly. Everything was installed there and when it was all complete, it set off for here.

The farthest the steamer went was on the second day after it left San Francisco, for it travelled 265 miles that day, and its shortest day was 230 miles. Therefore, its average speed was a little over 10 miles per hour.

The length of this ship is 150 feet and the width is 29 feet; its depth is 14 feet. Its tonnage according to the captain is 420. Its body is a little larger than the Paeli, and a little smaller than the Malulani.

Its design is similar in every manner with the Malulani, and so too are the rooms and the decks. There are 8 double state rooms on the upper deck, and 8 rooms below in the stern.

The name of this new steamship is the name of Mrs. M. E. Foster [Mary E. Foster], the wife of the President of the Inter-Island Steam Navigation Company.

This steamer will be set aside for Kauai under Captain Freeman, and next week, it will be sent to her ports for the first time.

[It is quite the strange coincidence that this ship named Mikahala (after the Hawaiian name of Mary E. Foster) is the same ship that ran into and sank the other ship named for her, the Mary E. Foster! See here for the article reporting the accident in 1894.]

(Ko Hawaii Pae Aina, 1/15/1887, p. 3)

KA MOKUAHI HOU ʻMIKAHALA.ʻ

Ko Hawaii Pae Aina, Buke X, Helu 3, Aoao 3. Ianuari 15, 1887.

Kaapuni Kukalahiwa, 1913.

[Found under: “LOCAL AND GENERAL”]

Kaapuni Kukalahiwa, an Hawaiian woman of Molokai, was brought to town [Honolulu] yesterday on the W. G. Hall and is held at the police station pending an examination of her sanity.

[Even after 100 years, this is still sad and disturbing… See the previous post, under Deaths.]

(Honolulu Star-Bulletin, 3/31/1913, p. 6)

Kaapuni Kukalahiwa...

Honolulu Star-Bulletin, Volume XX, Number 6549, page 6. March 31, 1913.

Still more on the Makee, the Malulani, and a reminder on naming, 1897.

[Found under: “ALL ALONG THE DOCKS”]

While leaving Kapaa at 2:30 Wednesday the James Makee was blown ashore. The W. G. Hall went to her assistance and, after lightering, the vessel was taken off three hours later. Part of the keel was torn off; two knees and one beam split; part of the anchor stock stuck through the vessel three feel below water. The Mikahala escorted the Makee to port.

[It is good to at least be aware that many times, Hawaiians called things (boat, for instance) a different name from what it was called in English. Here you see the W. G. Hall mentioned. It might sound more familiar to you as the Malulani.

Spelling is also varied in Hawaiian on occasion. You would expect in the Hawaiian-Language Newspapers, the James Makee to be written Kimo Maki (which it is at times), but it is also seen as Kimo Makee, James Maki, and James Makee as well! On a somewhat related note, Ena Road in Waikiki is not pronounced like “ena” as is so often heard today from the youngsters, but it is pronounced like “ina” and refers to the old-time Ing Family. So you will see in the Hawaiian-Language Newspapers, John Ena, John Ina, Keoni Ena, Keoni Ina…

I would like to see an easy online reference done for English/Hawaiian name variants done!]

(Hawaiian Star, 1/2/1897, p. 2)

While leaving Kapaa at 2:30...

The Hawaiian Star, Volume III, Number 1160, Page 2. January 2, 1897.

More on the Makee, 1897.

JAMES MAKEE AGROUND.

Accident to One of the Inter-Island Boats at Kapaa.

The James Makee met with a streak of misfortune on her last trip to Kauai. She was leaving Kapaa about 2:30 p. m. on Wednesday with 650 bags of sugar on board. The wind was blowing a perfect gale, and the Makee was blown upon the knuckle, sticking fast.

The W. G. Hall¹ came over from Koloa to the assistance of the Makee.

Capt. Peterson gave orders to have the sugar discharged. Something over 200 bags was put into the W. G. Hall and the rest was taken back to Kapaa.

The Makee had her stern lightened, and she swung around into deep water about 5 p. m. Five hours later she had all her cargo out, and she slid off with her keel very badly damaged.

The Makee left for Koloa at 8:30 a. m. on Thursday and arrived in Hanamaulu at 7:30 p. m. same day. Here she met the Mikahala and the two came to Honolulu together.

¹The W. G. Hall was also known as Malulani.

(Hawaiian Gazette, 1/5/1897, p. 5)

JAMES MAKEE AGROUND.

The Hawaiian Gazette, Volume XXXII, Number 2, Page 5. January 5, 1897.

Auhea iho nei la o Makee, A ka Malulani la e huli hele nei… 1897.

Kimo Maki Near Disaster.

Tuesday Night past, when the steamship James Makee was in Kapaa, Kauai, while the strong winds were blowing upon us and there as well, it was blown towards land while it attempted to head out to sea. It was stuck for two hours, and during this time, its cargo was unloaded, and the Malulani arrived to give assistance. Looking from the underside, it was seen that part of its keel [kila] was lost, two knees [kuli] and one beam [kua] at the stem were split, and there was a hole underneath, perhaps three feet below sea level at the base of the anchor. The Malulani accompanied it until arriving here in the morning of this past Friday. It will be placed atop the marine railway.

[I am guessing that this is the incident which inspired the famous composition still often heard today!]

(Makaainana, 1/4/1897, p. 8)

Kokoke e Poino ke Kimo Maki.

Ka Makaainana, Buke VII, Ano Hou—Helu 1. Aoao 8. Ianuari 4, 1897.