William S. Ellis, leader of the glee club accompanying the Royal Hawaiian Band on tour, 1906.

THE ROYAL HAWAIIAN BAND AND THE HAWAIIAN GLEE CLUB.

WILLIAM S. ELLIS, THE LEADER OF THE SINGERS THAT ARE TRAVELLING WITH THE ROYAL HAWAIIAN BAND.

In the month of June, the Royal Hawaiian Band is leaving Honolulu and going on their tour of the states of the United States of America, and their number will increase until it includes forty people. Other than that, the band will go with a Hawaiian glee club that is made up of twenty people.

William S. Ellis formed the glee club going along with the band, and currently there are fifteen skilled singers who are practicing. When the band arrives in San Francisco, this glee club will be increased by the club that is touring America under the leadership of John S. Ellis.

(Kuokoa, 3/9/1906, p. 1)

KA BANA HAWAII A ME KA HUI HIMENI HAWAII.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLIV, Helu 10, Aoao 1. Maraki 9, 1906.

More on the Makee, 1897.

JAMES MAKEE AGROUND.

Accident to One of the Inter-Island Boats at Kapaa.

The James Makee met with a streak of misfortune on her last trip to Kauai. She was leaving Kapaa about 2:30 p. m. on Wednesday with 650 bags of sugar on board. The wind was blowing a perfect gale, and the Makee was blown upon the knuckle, sticking fast.

The W. G. Hall¹ came over from Koloa to the assistance of the Makee.

Capt. Peterson gave orders to have the sugar discharged. Something over 200 bags was put into the W. G. Hall and the rest was taken back to Kapaa.

The Makee had her stern lightened, and she swung around into deep water about 5 p. m. Five hours later she had all her cargo out, and she slid off with her keel very badly damaged.

The Makee left for Koloa at 8:30 a. m. on Thursday and arrived in Hanamaulu at 7:30 p. m. same day. Here she met the Mikahala and the two came to Honolulu together.

¹The W. G. Hall was also known as Malulani.

(Hawaiian Gazette, 1/5/1897, p. 5)

JAMES MAKEE AGROUND.

The Hawaiian Gazette, Volume XXXII, Number 2, Page 5. January 5, 1897.

Auhea iho nei la o Makee, A ka Malulani la e huli hele nei… 1897.

Kimo Maki Near Disaster.

Tuesday Night past, when the steamship James Makee was in Kapaa, Kauai, while the strong winds were blowing upon us and there as well, it was blown towards land while it attempted to head out to sea. It was stuck for two hours, and during this time, its cargo was unloaded, and the Malulani arrived to give assistance. Looking from the underside, it was seen that part of its keel [kila] was lost, two knees [kuli] and one beam [kua] at the stem were split, and there was a hole underneath, perhaps three feet below sea level at the base of the anchor. The Malulani accompanied it until arriving here in the morning of this past Friday. It will be placed atop the marine railway.

[I am guessing that this is the incident which inspired the famous composition still often heard today!]

(Makaainana, 1/4/1897, p. 8)

Kokoke e Poino ke Kimo Maki.

Ka Makaainana, Buke VII, Ano Hou—Helu 1. Aoao 8. Ianuari 4, 1897.