More on prolific Charles Furneaux, 1881.

Mr. Furneaux’s Paintings.

A very interesting series of oil paintings by Mr. Furneaux is to be seen in the tower room of the Government Building [Aliiolani Hale]. These are chiefly sketches of the volcanic phenomena which have been displayed on Hawaii since November last. Having been on the spot from the beginning of the eruption, and taking a great interest in it, Mr. Furneaux has been able to secure illustrations of all its phases during the progress of the flow, from its source to the immediate proximity of the sea. The first of the series is a view taken from Kawaihae, in November last, after the flow had divided into two or more streams; one the Kau stream, which, after threatening the Kapapala Plantation, has long since ceased to flow; another the flow towards the plateau between Maunaloa and Maunakea, which, after many windings and doublings, is now threatening the town and harbor of Hilo. The next view was taken from Hilo Bay, and shows the three streams which were so conspicuous on the face of the mountain in November last. Immediately after his arrival Mr. Furneaux paid a visit to the crater of eruption, which is situated at an elevation of about 12,000 feet, or about 2,000 feet below the summit of the mountain. Three of the paintings depict this crater, one being from a point which gives a view of its interior. Another picture gives a near view of the blow-hole, or secondary crater, from which a discharge of lava was noticed on December 3rd. The next group of paintings gives us vivid illustrations of the conditions of things near Hilo in April and May last. In the former month Mr. Furneaux obtained a fine view of the main flow, as it appeared in the woods about eight miles from Hilo, at the time when its whole width of two to two and a half miles was in a molten and very active state, just at a point where the Puna, Waiakea and Hilo flows were being separately developed from it. In this picture we have a fine illustration of the “volcano cloud” with its deep red tinge looking more fiery than the very lava whose glow it reflects. The next of the series shows the curious phenomena of a waterspout on the lava flow, a sight frequently witnessed when the front face of the stream was lingering in the woods. Another picture also taken in April at the same distance from Hilo, shows the black and broken surface of the flow of 1856 and this new and greater flow creeping up to and over it. The next series of sketches were of the Waiakea flow taken two months before the sudden outburst by which it has threatened the sugar mill. One is of the artist’s camp in a dense growth of ohias, tree-ferns and wild bananas close to the edge of the flow. Another sketch from the tent door pictures some bananas, ferns and creepers with the red glare from the lava as a background. A third is a daylight view of the flow showing the havoc made in the lovely forest thus cruelly invaded. This sketch was taken when one tall ohia remained still erect with lava all round it. John Hall, whose place has since been destroyed, was Mr. Furneaux’s guide, and the latter made a sketch of his house before its fate was anticipated. This view was taken in May; a companion picture shows everything overwhelmed except a tree and part of the fence, with an extraordinary pit in the foreground, revealing the liquid lava flowing beneath the cooled crust. Later in May Mr. Furneaux paid a visit to what is known as the Hilo flow. Among the group of sketches then taken is one of the advanced part of the flow, with a group of Hawaiians getting specimens in the foreground; a sketch of Hale Laumaia, with the volcanic cloud hanging over the wooded scenery of the background; a sketch of the flow at the moment of one of the gas explosions, which are common when the lava is passing over the surface of previous flows, and penetrating into the caverns which about in the dead lava. Then comes a sketch in which we have a cascade of lava falling over a ledge of bare rock, and by way of contrast to its lurid fire, the flame of burning timber and undergrowth on the right hand of the picture. Following this series is a picture of the Waiakea flow as seen from a distance before its sudden advance; also a sketch of H. H. Ruth Keelikolani’s place, where that flow will probably reach the sea. The last group are from sketches taken late in July, after the Waiakea flow had pushed forward with so much violence. One of John Hall’s property has already been alluded to; another shows the lava flowing over a precipice about 60 feet wide, and 14 or 15 feet high, into a great pool of water—a scene already familiar to us through Mr. Dickson’s photographs; and a third shows the Waiakea mill, and the position of the flow on 25th July, with the intervening land. One interesting picture shows the way in which the lava at times pushes its way forward, throwing out snake-like tongues of fire from the black front of the stream.

Besides these paintings, there are some pictures of Halemaumau, and some views of forest and mountain scenery. Mr. Furneaux has also a number of other pictures, which he has not at present opened out for the public view, as he intends to return at once to Hilo to increase his store of sketches, and to catch, if possible, the lava stream in the very act of precipitating itself into the sea.

(Pacific Commercial Advertiser, 8/13/1881, p. 3)

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The Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume XXVI, Number 7, Page 3. August 13, 1881.

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The Hawaiian National Museum, 1876.

The Hawaiian Museum is now ready for the reception of articles of interest pertaining to the Archeology and Natural History of the Kingdom.

Glass cases have been fitted up, which are secured with locks: and depositors may rest assured that any articles of interest which they may deposit in the Museum will be carefully preserved.

All articles sent to the Museum will be entered in the names of their depositors, whether sent as loans, gifts, or for sale. Each article should be accompanied with a concise description, and be designated whether sent as loans, gifts or for sale; and if for sale, the prices should be stated.

Any one desirous of contributing to the Museum in any of the specific branches of the natural history of the kingdom, will meet with every encouragement, and all the assistance it may be possible to grant in the furtherance of his efforts, by making such desires known at the Curator’s Office, in the Museum Room, Government House.

All articles designed for the Museum should be sent to the “Curator of the Hawaiian Museum, Government House;” and the receipt of all articles will be duly acknowledged.

The Hawaiian Museum will be open to the public, every day, Sundays excepted, between the hours of 9 A. M., to 4 P. M.

H. R. Hitchcock,

Curator Hawaiian Museum.

Honolulu, Nov. 8th, 1875.

(Hawaiian Gazette, 3/8/1876, p. 2)

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The Hawaiian Gazette, Volume XII, Number 10, Page 2. March 8, 1876.

Transfer of treasures of the National Museum to the Bishop Museum, 1891.

SLIPPING AWAY.

Barring any obstacles, during some of the days of this week, the location of the artifacts housed in the National Museum Office at Aliiolani Hale will be transferred to the Bishop Museum Office at Kamehameha School, to go under the care of Prof. W. S. Brigham of the Bishop Museum.

If the artifacts of the Nation are moved to their intended new nest, then that office will be open for other Government Agencies, like the Department of Land Survey, and its space will become an office for the two houses, and that is great because it is directly adjacent to the Attorney General’s Office; but this all depends on the decision of the one who sings.

(Leo o ka Lahui, 1/26/1891, p. 3)

E PAHEE ANA I KA WELOWELO.

Ka Leo o ka Lahui, Buke II, Helu 115, Aoao 3. Ianuari 26, 1891.

Always important to look at sources. 1893 / 2012.

HAWAII ESCAPES FROM JAPAN.

The raising of the American flag over Hawaii is one of the greatest things done that cannot be repaid. It blocks the nation of Japan from establishing its rule over Hawaii. When the warship Naniwa arrived here, it was clear that if the American flag was not waving over Aliiolani Hale, then the Japanese flag would have been put in its place. And then they would have returned the Queen and the Japanese would have been supplied with weapons and took Hawaii for Japan. It all would have happened if the Boston did not hold them off. But when they saw the American flag raised, they were afraid to do this, for it would be fighting with the United States of America.

Perhaps now Liliuokalani’s attendants are hoping that by the taking down of the American flag, the Japanese will be free to come and return the alii to the throne under the Japanese flag. Should that be the thought of some of them, they are gravely mistaken.

The American troops will save Hawaii from the interference by the other powers. When Japan tries to foment something of that sort, that will be when the soldiers of America will be deployed again. This has been announced to the Commissioner and the captain of the Naniwa. They will not start a war with America without it being proclaimed in advance by the Emperor of Japan. Japan has no desire to war against America because of the dispute over Hawaii. There is nothing to fear.

America will not interfere in the local government of Hawaii nei, however it will guard Hawaii with force against the entering of other national powers into this Archipelago.

[It is always important to look at what newspaper an article comes from. Also, long-running newspapers (and people for that matter) don’t necessarily keep their same ideologies throughout their entire life…]

(Kuokoa, 4/8/1893, p. 2)

UA PAKELE HAWAII MAI IA IAPANA.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXXII, Helu 14, Aoao 2. Aperila 8, 1893.

Decorating the Kamehameha Statue, 1912.

[Found under: “Local News”]

All members of the Ahahui Kamehameha Division 1 are requested to assemble in the Building of the Secret Society, Odd Fellows, at 10 in the morning of this coming Sunday, June 9, 1912, to go on to pray in Kawaiahao Church, as is done in all past years; and they are also ordered to assemble within Kapiolani Hale at half past 8 on the morning of Tuesday, the 11th of June, 1912, to go and decorate the statue of Kamehameha I in front of the Government Building. Do not forget this order!

(Kuokoa, 6/7/1912, p. 8)

Ua makemakeia na lala apau...

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLVIII, Helu 23, Aoao 8. Iune 7, 1912.

More on Transit of Venus, 1874.

The Day to Watch the Stars.

(Written for the Kuokoa)

The afternoon of this past Tuesday of this week, December 8th, was the day when Astronomers from times past and of these times believed that Venus [Hokuloa] would pass in front of the Sun, and it indeed did happen.

The Sun came out that morning shinning nicely, and its rays continued to shine forth with clarity until the second when Hokuloa’s was seen beginning to peep over at the edge of the sun. The heavens were clear and the floating clouds were banished away, with just one seen, the thick, black cloud surrounding the heavens.

Here are the places in Honolulu set aside by the people wanting to view the appearance of Hokuloa as it passed by: Honuakaha in Honolulu, the actual base of the Astronomers; the Government Surveying Office in the Government Building Aliiolani, for the Government Surveyor Laiana [C. J. Lyons]; the Labor Office, for David N. Flitner; Kapunahou [Punahou School], for the head of the Government Surveyors, W. D. Alekanedero [W. D. Alexander]; at Pawaa, for the Deputy Harbor Master of Honolulu, Captain Daniela [Daniel] Smith. And for the multitudes who just wanted a glimpse, they grabbed real telescopes and looked straight at the sun; and for those without telescopes, they grabbed shards of glass and placed them over candles until black, and then looked and could see.

From the base of the British Astronomers at Honuakaha, it was very calm, there were no one allowed entrance, there was no talking, no whispering, and nothing that would cause excitement was desired; a battalion of soldiers was sent to the observation area to guard their peace. The Astronomer Boys put their all into their work for which they were sent by the government at great expense. Not one of them has any complaints about Hawaii for they were provided and blessed with a totally clear sky, and perhaps we would not be mistaken to say that these astronomers were very lucky for getting this good day for which they will not forget Hawaii.

And by the kindness of the British Astronomers in Honolulu, we have these times below from various telescopes the Astronomers and others away from different places.

When Hokuloa was seen barely at the edge of the Sun, here are the different times of the British Astronomers:

Tupman, (Head Astronomer.) 3 [hr.], 7 [min.], 1 [sec.]

Noble, (Assistant Astronomer.) 3 [hr.], 7 [min.], 3 [sec.]

When Hokuloa began to clearly move into the face of the Sun, here are the various times from the Astronomers of Britain and those people from here:

Tupman, (Head Astronomer.) 3 [hr.], 35 [min.], 56 [sec.]

Noble, (Assistant.) 3 [hr.], 35 [min.], 54½ [sec.]

D. Smith (Of Hawaii.) 3 [hr.], 35 [min.], 54 [sec.]

C. J. Lyons (Of Hawaii.) 3 [hr.], 35 [min.], 54 [sec.]

D. N. Flitner (Of Hawaii.) 3 [hr.], 35 [min.], 58 [sec.]

The times seen by the last three were not taken into account by the Astronomers. However, there was not much difference between the times seen by the British Astronomers and our people keeping time. But it was surely a nice day for observing.

The slides taken were not as great as was hoped for, but they are indeed of much value.

(Kuokoa, 12/12/1874, p. 2)

Ka la Kilo Hoku.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XIII, Helu 50, Aoao 2. Dekemaba 12, 1874.