Hawaiian birds, 1874.

Hawaiian Birds.—A letter from Hilo says: “There is in this town a beautiful collection of Hawaiian birds, finely preserved. It would be a valuable acquisition to the Government Museum, if Mr. Mills, the gentleman to whom it belongs, and who has been some years and at considerable expense in the work of collection, would part with it. Among the specimens is one called ‘the wingless bird,’ now nearly if not quite extinct on these islands. They are, however, numerous on Wake’s and Laysan [Laysin] Islands, where I have seen them, and supposed they were a new species. The body is about the size of a pigeon’s, they have no feathers on the flipper-like wings, and they run with such speed that one would take them for rats at first sight.”

[I wonder what became of this collection. Perhaps they went to the National Museum and then to the Bishop Museum. And it seems that among the different upcoming exhibits at the Bishop Museum is one on birds!]

(Pacific Commercial Advertiser, 10/3/1874, p. 3)

PCA_10_3_1874_3

The Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume XIX, Number 14, Page 3. October 3, 1874.

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Transfer of treasures of the National Museum to the Bishop Museum, 1891.

SLIPPING AWAY.

Barring any obstacles, during some of the days of this week, the location of the artifacts housed in the National Museum Office at Aliiolani Hale will be transferred to the Bishop Museum Office at Kamehameha School, to go under the care of Prof. W. S. Brigham of the Bishop Museum.

If the artifacts of the Nation are moved to their intended new nest, then that office will be open for other Government Agencies, like the Department of Land Survey, and its space will become an office for the two houses, and that is great because it is directly adjacent to the Attorney General’s Office; but this all depends on the decision of the one who sings.

(Leo o ka Lahui, 1/26/1891, p. 3)

E PAHEE ANA I KA WELOWELO.

Ka Leo o ka Lahui, Buke II, Helu 115, Aoao 3. Ianuari 26, 1891.