Hawaii loses another kii, 1877.

An Interesting Idol.—Mons. Ballieu has been so fortunate as to secure a wooden god, which was quite recently discovered in a cave on the island of Hawaii, on the lower slopes of Mauna Kea. Continue reading

Hawaiian birds, 1874.

Hawaiian Birds.—A letter from Hilo says: “There is in this town a beautiful collection of Hawaiian birds, finely preserved. It would be a valuable acquisition to the Government Museum, if Mr. Mills, the gentleman to whom it belongs, and who has been some years and at considerable expense in the work of collection, would part with it. Among the specimens is one called ‘the wingless bird,’ now nearly if not quite extinct on these islands. They are, however, numerous on Wake’s and Laysan [Laysin] Islands, where I have seen them, and supposed they were a new species. The body is about the size of a pigeon’s, they have no feathers on the flipper-like wings, and they run with such speed that one would take them for rats at first sight.”

[I wonder what became of this collection. Perhaps they went to the National Museum and then to the Bishop Museum. And it seems that among the different upcoming exhibits at the Bishop Museum is one on birds!]

(Pacific Commercial Advertiser, 10/3/1874, p. 3)

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The Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume XIX, Number 14, Page 3. October 3, 1874.

The Hawaiian National Museum, 1876.

The Hawaiian Museum is now ready for the reception of articles of interest pertaining to the Archeology and Natural History of the Kingdom.

Glass cases have been fitted up, which are secured with locks: and depositors may rest assured that any articles of interest which they may deposit in the Museum will be carefully preserved.

All articles sent to the Museum will be entered in the names of their depositors, whether sent as loans, gifts, or for sale. Each article should be accompanied with a concise description, and be designated whether sent as loans, gifts or for sale; and if for sale, the prices should be stated.

Any one desirous of contributing to the Museum in any of the specific branches of the natural history of the kingdom, will meet with every encouragement, and all the assistance it may be possible to grant in the furtherance of his efforts, by making such desires known at the Curator’s Office, in the Museum Room, Government House.

All articles designed for the Museum should be sent to the “Curator of the Hawaiian Museum, Government House;” and the receipt of all articles will be duly acknowledged.

The Hawaiian Museum will be open to the public, every day, Sundays excepted, between the hours of 9 A. M., to 4 P. M.

H. R. Hitchcock,

Curator Hawaiian Museum.

Honolulu, Nov. 8th, 1875.

(Hawaiian Gazette, 3/8/1876, p. 2)

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The Hawaiian Gazette, Volume XII, Number 10, Page 2. March 8, 1876.

J. E. Chamberlain, collector for the Hawaiian National Museum, 1876.

Curios for the Government Museum.

The Morning Star brought up for the Hawaiian Government the following curios, corals, &c. Two sets Gilbert Island armor complete with helmets; also shark teeth sword and spear, mats and native dresses; eel basket; common fish basket; umbrella coral, three feet six inches in diameter, perfect, from Apian by Mr. Randolph.

From Marshall Island: Spears, Male fringe petticoats and woman’s mat dress; carved figure-head; model of canoe fully rigged; paddles; red coral; black coral; platter coral, bone adzes from Strong’s Island. Continue reading

Wahi pana of Waipio, Hawaii, 1877.

Travels in North Kona.

Our guide [W. A. Mio] asked him [unnamed person very familiar with the wahi pana of Waipio] to go with us and he agreed, and we moved on until we stood at the edge of the road beneath Koaekea, the road taken by Umi and his aikane, Piimaiwaa folks [that being Piimaiwaa and Omaokamau], and makai of there was the house foundation of Milu, that being Paoo; upon there is a rock with an indentation, where the liver of Milu was placed, taken by Kaalaeanuiahina and hidden there.

Also upon there is where the palate [kileo] of Kihapu was broken because it was dropped from the mouth of Puapualenalena, the dog who fetched that conch, and it sounded, which is when the gods atop Hokuwelowelo guarding it heard.

I will speak a little on that; Liloa had a awa patch in the uplands of Moomuku, and he was bewildered by the one who raided it, and after a constant watch, it was seen that it was a dog that was doing the stealing, and when the dog left with the awa, the men followed until they arrived at the residence of the keeper of the dog; the men returned to Liloa and told him they found the one who was stealing from his awa patch, that it was a dog and his keeper, in the mountains facing Waimea; that is when Liloa commanded his men to bring the awa thieves, and Liloa also ordered them to fetch them and bring them unharmed, and this order of the alii was carried out; the men arrived before the man and his dog, and they told him of words of the alii to come; the keeper of the dog agreed at once and he went and appeared before Liloa. Liloa asked, “Can your dog go and fetch the conch (Kihapu), because it is currently my great nemesis; and should it be gotten by your dog, then you and your dog will live;” however the keeper of the dog believed, as for Liloa’s words saying the two of them would die, that Liloa and his men would not be victorious over his dog, Puapualenalena.

However, the keeper of the dog agreed and commanded his dog that he was to fetch it, and when Puapualenalena was coming back with Kihapu, a side of the conch hit the brow of a cliff, and that is why it fell and sounded, the kileo was broken, and the gods heard; he hastened, he was gone, and the gods were left frustrated. If you all have a desire to see Kihapu, go to Aliiolani Hale [Hawaiian National Museum], and you can see it in the room of glorious things.

Directly below the road of Koaekea are the fishponds of Liloa, Lokoula and Laakea [Lalakea]; but Lokoula is covered up in sand, and upland of the ponds is the house site of Liloa.

[Check back for the continuation of this article.]

(Lahui Hawaii, 11/1/1877, p. 2)

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Ka Lahui Hawaii, Buke III, Helu 44, Aoao 2. Novemaba 1, 1877.