J. E. Chamberlain, collector for the Hawaiian National Museum, 1876.

Curios for the Government Museum.

The Morning Star brought up for the Hawaiian Government the following curios, corals, &c. Two sets Gilbert Island armor complete with helmets; also shark teeth sword and spear, mats and native dresses; eel basket; common fish basket; umbrella coral, three feet six inches in diameter, perfect, from Apian by Mr. Randolph.

From Marshall Island: Spears, Male fringe petticoats and woman’s mat dress; carved figure-head; model of canoe fully rigged; paddles; red coral; black coral; platter coral, bone adzes from Strong’s Island. Continue reading

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Unfortunately, some of Chamberlain’s mangrove seems to have survived, 1876.

Salt Water Trees.—Bonabe and Strong’s Island are tree-clad to tide water and below, several varieties, five we are told, grow in the marshes and flats that are flooded at high tide. Some are large and tall, suitable for timber, and all make excellent fuel. J. E. Chamberlain brought within ten day’s sail two hundred mangrove trees that were injured in a gale. Several of them still survive and may grow in the care of Mr. Derby. The mangrove tree grows from the seed that floats on the tide and may be had by gathering. By perforating the bottom of a tight barrel, then filling it full of mangrove seeds, and keeping them wet with salt water, one thousand or then thousand mangrove trees may be brought from Bonabe safely and planted on Waikiki and Ewa flats in 1876.

(Hawaiian Gazette, 3/22/1876, p. 2)

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The Hawaiian Gazette, Volume XII, Number 12, Page 2. March 22, 1876.

Mangrove for Hawaii? 1876.

[Found under: “Ka Moolelo o ka Huakai aku nei a Hoku Ao i Maikonisia.”]

Ualana.

This high island is similar to Hawaii being that it is a high mountain, but it is different in that there are trees that grow from the mountain peaks all the way to the ocean, and there are trees that grow in the ocean. There are three kinds of trees growing in the ocean. I brought from Ponape 200 mangrove plants. But they all died. If we really want to bring in that plant, it should be brought in by seed, and planted extensively; thousands in Waikiki, Ewa, Waimea on Kauai, on Maui, Molokai, and Hawaii; this tree reaches from twenty to forty feet high, and is good as lumber for house building and for firewood.

[This appears in a description of travels of the Morning Star to Micronesia, written by Jeremiah E. Chamberlain, the representative of the Board of Hawaiian Missions.]

(Lahui Hawaii, 4/6/1876, p. 2)

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Ka Lahui Hawaii, Buke II, Helu 15, Aoao 2. Aperila 6, 1876.