Vermont hears of Restoration Day, 1843.

SANDWICH ISLANDS.

Letters from the Islands to August 5, furnish some additional particulars relating to the restoration of the native government.—The doings of Lord Paulet’s Provisional Government were outrageous, and compelled the retirement of Dr. Judd from all participation in it. The following letter is from the Boston Daily Advertiser:

U. S. Ship Constellation,
Off Honolulu, Sandwich Islands, Aug. 1843.

It is probably known in the United States that in February last, his Lordship Captain George Paulet, of Her Majesty’s ship Carysfort, visit these Islands; and after urging upon King Kamehameha III., in succession, various demands, with many of which it was found impossible to comply, an making preparations to fire upon the city of Honolulu, compelled a cession of the Sovereignty to the Queen of Great Britain, and appointed a Commission of four, of which his Majesty or his deputy were permitted to be a member, for the provisional government of the Island, until her Majesty’s pleasure should be made known; which time the “existing laws, and those made at the ensuing council of the King and chiefs” were to continue in full force so far as natives were concerned,” and to for the basis of the administration of justice by the Commission between foreigns residents on these Islands, and all existing engagements of the King were to be executed and performed as if the cession had never been made.” Continue reading

On kake and Kauikeaouli and Kalama and Kaahumanu, 1896.

[Found under: “NA WAHI PANA A KAULANA O HONOLULU, OAHU NEI, I UHIIA I KA LEPO A NALOWALE LOA HOI I KEIA AU HOU.”]

KAHALEULUHE

5.—Kahaleuluhe was where the Anglican Church stands today, and its stature is hard to picture today. This was a Royal residence during the time of Kamehameha III, the kindhearted Alii who was shown affection through words of kake, because of the fear Kalama had lest she be killed by Kaahumanu and Kinau, Continue reading

What was being said, 1893.

REVOLT IN HAWAII

The United States Asked to Annex the Islands.

A PROBLEM FOR THIS COUNTRY.

American Interests Demand Protection—Other Powers Might Object—Queen Dethroned.

San Francisco, Jan. 28.—News comes from the Sandwich Islands today that a revolution has resulted in the dethronement of Queen Liliuokalani and the newly established government desires to have Hawaii annexed to the United States. A commission of five men appointed by the new revolutionary government arrived here today from Honolulu bearing this news and will proceed at once to Washington to lay the matter before our government. The revolution appears to have had its direct cause inthe new constitution which the vueen essayed to force upon the people and which would have greatly increased her autocratic power. The new instrument, like the queen herself, was very inimicable to the white residents and their immense business interests. The revolution was almost a bloodless one, the government being taken by surprise. Continue reading

Joseph Arthur Kamauoha, Matthew Puakahakoililanimanuia Makalua, and Abraham Charles Piianaia study abroad in England, 1883.

Hawaiian Boys Seeking Knowledge.

Kamauoha Jr., Matthew Makalua, and Piianaia were sent to London for education, and we have received a number of joyous reports that will make all of Hawaii proud. Continue reading

The meeting of Kalaniopuu and Cook, 1867.

[Found under: “KA MOOLELO O KAMEHAMEHA I.”]

The Era of Kalaniopuu, 1779. Pertaining to the Death of Captain Cook, that is Lono.

On the 24th of January, Kalaniopuu and his warriors returned from Maui and landed at Awili in Kaawaloa, and stayed at Hanamua at Keaweaheulu’s place, but they were also on Maui at war with Kahekili.

Kalaniopuu saw the many women were at the ocean on the ship to prostitute themselves [hookamakama], so Kalaniopuu forbade women from going down to the ship. And the haole saw that the women were not coming to the ship, so the haole went into the uplands of Napoopoo and at Kahauloa, and on this side of Kaawaloa to solicit prostitution, and the women received a great amount of foreign rubbish [opala]. Continue reading

George Vancouver arrives once more on February 14, 1793.

[Found under: “He Moolelo Hawaii”]

Vancouver Returns

In the month of February, the 14 day, 1793, Vancouver [Vanekouwa] returned to Hawaii nei, from the northwest of America, and landed at Kawaihae.

The men pleaded for guns and powder from him. Vancouver refused and would not sell those sort things to them. There was great desire of Hawaiians for those things during those days, because it was a time of war, and Kamehameha was conquering the nation then; Oahu and Kauai remained.

And from there, Vancouver landed at Kealakekua, on the 22nd of that month and met with Kamehameha.

At that time, he gifted Kamehameha with two cattle, a bull and a cow. The cattle that Vancouver brought were from Monterey, a land in America.

These animals were greatly appreciated by Hawaiians because they were unusual, and they were called puaa pipi. It is from those pipi that the cattle which roam these days at Waimea and Maunakea and the other forests of Hawaii proliferated.

Kamehameha treated Vancouver kindly; Vancouver was facing hardship without water and took his water barrels into the uplands, and Kamehameha commanded his men to carry the barrels and to fill them with water. Continue reading

Recalling the death of James Cook, 1896.

[Found under: “He Moolelo no ka HOOKUMUIA ANA O HAWAII”]

PERTAINING TO THE DEATH OF LONO.

On the 24th of January 1779, Kalaniopuu returned from Maui; Lono was at Kealakekua in Kona, and Kalaniopuu met with Lono, and Kalaniopuu the chief treated Lono kindly and donned a ahu ula upon Lono, with kahili, and Kalaniopuu did a great many good things for Lono.

And on the 4th of February 1779, Lono leaves Kealakekua and his ship sails directly outside of Kawaihae and Kohala; it is noticed that one of the masts of his ship is rotten, so he returns to Kealakekua to build a new mast for his ship. Continue reading

Observations from an Englishman, 1893.

From a Travelling Englishman.

From the time I arrived in Honolulu until today, I’ve heard often of matters pertaining to those referred to as the circle of missionaries, and the dimness of their ideas; I’ve observed their actions very carefully.

I saw today in the Advertiser [Avalataisa] about the party being given for Captain Wiltse, and how they will sit at this party for two hours and a half with just wine to drink and nothing to eat.

Giving a banquet for a high ranking Captain without serving Glasses of Champaigne [Kamapeni] during all that time is like acting out Hamlet without the ghost.

This will not become something that is greatly ridiculed, but this goes back to the way of life of the old Missionaries, with  their humbling station of evil thoughts.

On the day after this party, I saw that Queen Liliuokalani was sent an invitation under the name Mrs. J. O. Dominis, and this is something quite vile by the Committee who did it; Should the Committee think that are considered adults, then it was improper of them to have sent such an invitation to the Queen.

The first thing taught to schoolchildren in Britain is not to kick a man when he falls down. But this is a woman they are kicking, and that woman is Queen Liliuokalani. This is action that can be called despicable of the meanest form, and should this Committee want to be freed of these words, then they must explain it from their side, or this contemptible act will be carried upon their backs.

Charles G. Nottage.

Hawaiian Hotel [Hotele Hawaii], Feb. 28, 1893.

[Perhaps this was meant to say that there was no wine, and only sparkling water? The article he seems to be talking about is found here on the Chronicling America site. PCA 2/28/1893, p. 2.

There is also reference to a separate party that he was invited to. The Queen is mentioned as “Mrs. J. O. Dominis”. This can be found also at Chronicling America, PCA 2/25/1893, p. 4.]

(Leo o ka Lahui, 3/3/1893, p. 3)

Mai Kekahi Haole Pelekane Kaahele Mai.

Ka Leo o ka Lahui, Buke II, Helu 654, Aoao 3. Maraki 3, 1893.

Letters from Samoa, 1889.

Malietoa Arrives in Samoa!

Three-thousand Go to Meet Him with Gifts!
Important Correspondences!

Apia, Upolu, Samoa.

July 23, 1889.

John S. Kukahiko,

Much aloha between us.

I arrived on the 18th of June and am doing well.

Before I left Honolulu on the 7th of June, I went to your place often, thinking that perhaps we would meet one final time, but you weren’t at your place.

I’ve seen what’s new here and I have gone with Hairama Kaumialii to see the battlegrounds here in Samoa. All of their actions are admirable; they are a fearless people and true warriors. They are a loving and kind people. These are the most comely people I’ve seen throughout the world.

Each morning the King Mataafa attends Catholic Mass nearby where I live. And when he attends mass, he is accompanied by his fearless warriors very prepared, carrying weapons and firearms. They are very cautious [?? lili] in their protection of him; there is no enemy who is able to abduct him, lest he be abused.

The German and British warships are here in the port of Apia, but the Germans cannot try once again wage war and take him captive. Mataafa has fine features, and when he goes to pray, he and his guards are a magnificent sight to see. He is well regarded by the haole and his own people.

On the 22nd of this month, the American Consul and Admiral Kimberly bestowed upon him gifts from the President of the United States for them helping the Americans in Apia in the recent terrible storm. The Counsul and Admiral Kimberly gave speeches, and Mataafa gave a short reply which was printed in the newspaper, “Samoan Times.”

I’ve met fequently with Hairam Kaumialii, but where he lives is twelve miles away from here, in Malie. Continue reading

Restoration Anthem, 1843.

The following hymn was sung by various circles on the day of the Restoration; as well as after the Temperance Picnic, given by His Majesty, to Foreign Residents and Naval Officers, (English and American,) at his Country Residence in Nuuanu Valley, August 3d.

RESTORATION ANTHEM.

Tune, ‘God Save the King.’

Hail! to our rightful King!
We joyful honors bring
This day to thee!
Long live your Majesty!
Long reign this dynasty!
And for posterity
The sceptre be!

Hail! to the worthy name!
Worthy his Country’s Fame
Thomas, the brave!
Long shall they virtues be,
Shrined in our memory
Who came to set us free,
Quick oe’r the wave!

Hail! to our Heavenly King!
To Thee our Thanks we bring,
Worthy of all;
Loud we thine honors raise!
Loud is our song of praise!
Smile on our future days,
Sovereign of all!

July 31, 1843.  Edwin O. Hall.

[This post may be just a little early this year, but it is good to not just remember momentous events like Ka La Hoihoi Ea just one day of the year. Last year, the Hawaiian Historical Society put up handwritten lyrics of this mele on their Facebook page on the 27th of July. Here we find it in print, just a few days following its being penned by Edwin O. Hall!]

(Temperance Advocate and Seamen’s Friend, 8/11/1843, p. 42)

RESTORATION ANTHEM.

Temperance Advocate and Seamen’s Friend, Volume I, Number VIII, Page 42. August 11, 1843.