The meeting of Kalaniopuu and Cook, 1867.

[Found under: “KA MOOLELO O KAMEHAMEHA I.”]

The Era of Kalaniopuu, 1779. Pertaining to the Death of Captain Cook, that is Lono.

On the 24th of January, Kalaniopuu and his warriors returned from Maui and landed at Awili in Kaawaloa, and stayed at Hanamua at Keaweaheulu’s place, but they were also on Maui at war with Kahekili.

Kalaniopuu saw the many women were at the ocean on the ship to prostitute themselves [hookamakama], so Kalaniopuu forbade women from going down to the ship. And the haole saw that the women were not coming to the ship, so the haole went into the uplands of Napoopoo and at Kahauloa, and on this side of Kaawaloa to solicit prostitution, and the women received a great amount of foreign rubbish [opala]. Continue reading

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Recalling the death of James Cook, 1896.

[Found under: “He Moolelo no ka HOOKUMUIA ANA O HAWAII”]

PERTAINING TO THE DEATH OF LONO.

On the 24th of January 1779, Kalaniopuu returned from Maui; Lono was at Kealakekua in Kona, and Kalaniopuu met with Lono, and Kalaniopuu the chief treated Lono kindly and donned a ahu ula upon Lono, with kahili, and Kalaniopuu did a great many good things for Lono.

And on the 4th of February 1779, Lono leaves Kealakekua and his ship sails directly outside of Kawaihae and Kohala; it is noticed that one of the masts of his ship is rotten, so he returns to Kealakekua to build a new mast for his ship. Continue reading

Miriam Kekupuohi dies, 1836.

[Found under: “MAKE.”]

Kailua, Hawaii, Feb. 9, 1836.

Died here in Kailua was the chiefess named Miriama Kekupuohi, on the 8th of February. She belonged to the church for eight years, and she was one of the first converts of Kailua nei. She was not known to have any entanglements.

She was very old, perhaps 80 years old. She was a wife of Kalaiopuu,* the chief when Lono [Captain Cook] came, in the first ship to arrive in Kaawaloa.

O Brethren, very true are the words of James 4:14. “Whereas ye know not what shall be on the morrow. For what is your life? It is even a vapour, that appeareth for a little time, and then vanisheth away.”  By DANIELA.

*Kalaiopuu was also known as Kaleiopuu and today is more commonly known as Kalaniopuu.

(Kumu Hawaii, 3/16/1836, p. 24)

Kailua, Hawaii...

Ke Kumu Hawaii, Buke 2, Pepa 6, Aoao 24. Maraki 16, 1836.