Death of Kaahumanu II, Kinau, 1839.

DEATH.

KAAHUMANU II.

At Honolulu on the 4th of this April.

She became sick on the 30th of December, in the early  morning; the sickness was paralysis. Her left hand and leg became paralyzed, and on the 31st, she was overcome by  sleep: She slept until the paralysis of her left side abated, but her sleep increased until the 2nd of April, and her siblings [? hoahanau] could not wake her. Continue reading

Advertisements

On kake and Kauikeaouli and Kalama and Kaahumanu, 1896.

[Found under: “NA WAHI PANA A KAULANA O HONOLULU, OAHU NEI, I UHIIA I KA LEPO A NALOWALE LOA HOI I KEIA AU HOU.”]

KAHALEULUHE

5.—Kahaleuluhe was where the Anglican Church stands today, and its stature is hard to picture today. This was a Royal residence during the time of Kamehameha III, the kindhearted Alii who was shown affection through words of kake, because of the fear Kalama had lest she be killed by Kaahumanu and Kinau, Continue reading

Kinau, Kaahumanu II, dies, 1839.

DIED.

KAAHUMANU II.

In Honolulu, on the 4th of April.

She became sick from the 30th of March, early in the morning; it was a paralysis. She was numb in her left hand and leg, and on the 31st, she fell into a sleep: This was a sleep where the paralysis on  her left side subsided, but her slumbering grew, until the 2nd of April when her fellow brethren could not wake her.

On the fourth, Kamehameha III, the King, arrived although he was sick, enduring this for his love for his “mother” [makuahine]. The King landed early in the morning, and at miday, at half past 12, that is when she died, without seeing the King.

Everyone is in mourning, and cry with aloha, because their alii has died, the one that was greatly loved. But on the fifth, the crying was ceased because of the illness of the King; talking loudly is not good.

(Kumu Hawaii, 4/10/1839, p. 92)

MAKE.

Ke Kumu Hawaii, Buke 4, Pepa 23, Aoao 92. Aperila 10, 1839.

O ko’u aupuni, he aupuni palapala ko’u, 1837.

From the Salem Gazette.

Please Exchange.”—On Friday, we received a file of the “Sandwich Island Gazette and Journal of Commerce,” with a request, on the outside of the package, to “Please Exchange.” On inspection of the parcel, we find the file is complete, from the establishment of the paper, the 30th of July last, during a period of four months. It is of small size, and printed weekly, at six dollars a year. The papers affords many paragraphs which are not without interest, as showing the state of society and affairs at the Islands. For the present, we content ourselves with quoting a royal letter:—

From the Sandwich Island Gazette.

Letter from the King.—We give a translation of a letter from His Majesty Kauikeauoli [Kauikeaouli], in reply to our application to him for permission to work our press, and publish a newspaper in this place.—The translation is literal, but its import is plain.

“To Stephen D. Mackintosh.

Honolulu, Oahu.

I assent to the letter which you sent me. It affords me pleasure to see the works of other lands and things that are new. If I was there, I should very much desire to see. I have said to Kinau, make printing presses. My thought is ended. Love to you and Reynolds.

By King Kauikeauoli.”

[This was a pretty exciting find. Kamehameha III proclaimed that his kingdom would be a kingdom of reading and writing. And indeed it was. Kamehameha III encourages the printing of newspapers, and here he writes, “If I was there…” because it seems he was in Kailua, Hawaii at the time, while the newspaper was to be printed in Honolulu. Unfortunately, The Sandwich Island Gazette and Journal of Commerce which ran from 7/30/1836 to 7/27/1839 is not available online at Chronicling America as of yet.

For more on this first English newspaper in Hawaii nei, see “Hawaii’s first English Newspaper and Its Editor,” by Helen P. Hoyt, appearing in the Annual Report of the Hawaiian Historical Society in 1954.]

(Constantine Republican, 5/31/1837, p. 2)

From the Salem Gazette.

Constantine Republican, Volume I, Number 48, page 2. May 31, 1837.

The birth of the future Kamehameha IV, 1839.

Honolulu March 4.

Kinau just gave birth, on the sabbath, Feb. 9, to a son. Kauikeaouli named him, Liholiho, for his older brother who died in foreign lands; and he took him as a child. He is living in the court of the King.

(Lama Hawaii, 3/14/1834, p. 2)

Honolulu Maraki 4.

Ka Lama Hawaii, Makahiki 1, Helu 5, Aoao 2. Maraki 14, 1834.

Different view of the seal of the republic, 1896.

Great Seal of the Republic of Hawaii.

In today’s P. C. Advertiser (February 25), a picture of the Great Seal of the Republic of Hawaii was printed.

By our understanding of that image, there is no way that those who established this Republic can erase or end or eradicate visages of the Monarchy and its accomplishments, from the seal mentioned above.

They stated and vowed that there will be no way that the reestablishment of the Kingdom of Hawaii nei will be allowed. However, when they set out to create a Seal for their Government. And now, that foolish idea of the plunderers and thugs has gone awry.

Being that, (1.) On that Great Seal, is the foundation of the first Seal of the Monarchy of Hawaii nei. (2.) There is the stripes of the Hawaiian Flag of the Monarchy. (3.) There stand puloulou, a symbol of the Hawaiian Monarchy of old. (4.) There is an image of Kamehameha I., the King who unified the Hawaiian Archipelago into one Nation. (5.) There are the words—”Ua Mau ke Ea o ka Aina i ka Pono” affixed onto this new Seal, the words given by King Kamehameha III after the restoration of the Independence of Hawaii nei by Great Britain.

All these things were from the Great Seal of the Monarchy of Hawaii nei (except Kamehameha I.)

The new things added are these. (1.) Rays of the Sun. (2.) The image of Kamehameha I. (3.) The image of the Goddess of Victory. (4.) The Star. (5.) The Phoenix Bird, and (6.) The words, Republic of Hawaii.

Their intense desire is to rub out, to stomp out, and to end for all time, things of the Monarchy of Hawaii nei, lest vestiges of that sort remain in Hawaii; but that is not possible: there is no erasing, nor putting end to deeds done by the past Monarchs of Hawaii.

We know the story of the Phoenix, but it is not the same as the explanatory speech by P. C. Jones at the Armory [Hale Paikaukoa] in the year 1893, and these are his words:

“Once, Mrs. Kinau Wilder [Waila] went to where Ostrich were raised near Diamond Head [Laeahi]. One of the birds of the French Doctor Trousseau laid an egg, and it was on that occasion given to Kinau, and the egg was called Kinau. However, it was left there to be sat on by a bird until it hatched.

“This is similar to this Republic,” according to Jones. “It was born like that egg, Kinau.”

There is one unfortunate thing about that egg called by the name of Kinau, that being, it was a rotten egg [huaelo]. There was no chick born from that egg.

Jones didn’t know of the outcome of that egg, for it was but a yolk-less egg [hua makani], a hua laalaau?, a worthless egg.

Perhaps this will be the outcome of the Republic to which he compares it to? But at any rate, that is the kind of Ostrich egg that Kinau chose.

The shell of that astonishing egg is kept at the residence of Trousseau [Kauka Farani] in Makiki.

This astonishing Ostrich is not the same as a Phoenix which rises from the ashes.

(Aloha Aina, 2/29/1896, p. 4)

Ke Sila Nui o ka Repubalika o Hawaii Nei.

Ke Aloha Hawaii, Buke II, Helu 9, Aoao 4. Feberuari 29, 1896.

First birth announcement in a Hawaiian-Language Newspaper? 1834.

Honolulu March 4.

Kinau just gave birth, on Sunday, Feb. 9th, to a son. Kauikeaouli named him Liholiho for his older brother who died in lands afar, and took this child as his own. The child is living with the King.

[This Liholiho, child of Kinau, is Kamehameha IV.]

Honolulu Maraki 4.

Ka Lama Hawaii, Makahiki 1, Helu 5, Aoao 2. Maraki 14, 1834.