Different view of the seal of the republic, 1896.

Great Seal of the Republic of Hawaii.

In today’s P. C. Advertiser (February 25), a picture of the Great Seal of the Republic of Hawaii was printed.

By our understanding of that image, there is no way that those who established this Republic can erase or end or eradicate visages of the Monarchy and its accomplishments, from the seal mentioned above.

They stated and vowed that there will be no way that the reestablishment of the Kingdom of Hawaii nei will be allowed. However, when they set out to create a Seal for their Government. And now, that foolish idea of the plunderers and thugs has gone awry.

Being that, (1.) On that Great Seal, is the foundation of the first Seal of the Monarchy of Hawaii nei. (2.) There is the stripes of the Hawaiian Flag of the Monarchy. (3.) There stand puloulou, a symbol of the Hawaiian Monarchy of old. (4.) There is an image of Kamehameha I., the King who unified the Hawaiian Archipelago into one Nation. (5.) There are the words—”Ua Mau ke Ea o ka Aina i ka Pono” affixed onto this new Seal, the words given by King Kamehameha III after the restoration of the Independence of Hawaii nei by Great Britain.

All these things were from the Great Seal of the Monarchy of Hawaii nei (except Kamehameha I.)

The new things added are these. (1.) Rays of the Sun. (2.) The image of Kamehameha I. (3.) The image of the Goddess of Victory. (4.) The Star. (5.) The Phoenix Bird, and (6.) The words, Republic of Hawaii.

Their intense desire is to rub out, to stomp out, and to end for all time, things of the Monarchy of Hawaii nei, lest vestiges of that sort remain in Hawaii; but that is not possible: there is no erasing, nor putting end to deeds done by the past Monarchs of Hawaii.

We know the story of the Phoenix, but it is not the same as the explanatory speech by P. C. Jones at the Armory [Hale Paikaukoa] in the year 1893, and these are his words:

“Once, Mrs. Kinau Wilder [Waila] went to where Ostrich were raised near Diamond Head [Laeahi]. One of the birds of the French Doctor Trousseau laid an egg, and it was on that occasion given to Kinau, and the egg was called Kinau. However, it was left there to be sat on by a bird until it hatched.

“This is similar to this Republic,” according to Jones. “It was born like that egg, Kinau.”

There is one unfortunate thing about that egg called by the name of Kinau, that being, it was a rotten egg [huaelo]. There was no chick born from that egg.

Jones didn’t know of the outcome of that egg, for it was but a yolk-less egg [hua makani], a hua laalaau?, a worthless egg.

Perhaps this will be the outcome of the Republic to which he compares it to? But at any rate, that is the kind of Ostrich egg that Kinau chose.

The shell of that astonishing egg is kept at the residence of Trousseau [Kauka Farani] in Makiki.

This astonishing Ostrich is not the same as a Phoenix which rises from the ashes.

(Aloha Aina, 2/29/1896, p. 4)

Ke Sila Nui o ka Repubalika o Hawaii Nei.

Ke Aloha Hawaii, Buke II, Helu 9, Aoao 4. Feberuari 29, 1896.

Artifacts from the 1895 Counter-Revolutionary War, 1912.

TWO ARTILLERY SHELLS FOUND AT KAPIOLANI

A Prisoner Found it While Digging up Dirt This Past Monday.

IT WAS BROUGHT TO SHOW

They were ammunition of the Monarchial Government Which Got There in the Revolutionary War.

Outside of Kapiolani Park last Monday, two artillery shells were found when the prisoners were in the middle of digging in the area where they are working; they are huge artillery that would have injured many if they had received those evil pills.

It was only by chance that the two shells were found, and it was lucky that the prisoner did not suffer injury when he came upon the shells as he hit one of them while digging with his pick; if it had blown up at that time, it would have been disaster, but that did not happen.

After the inmate perceived this solid thing that he was digging with his pick, he figured it was probably a rock or something, and put down his pick and began to dig with his hands.

While digging with his hands, he spotted something shiny like metal, and he kept at it until out from the dirt amazingly came two artillery shells from the same place.

A Chinese man who saw these two huge shells brought them here in town after wrapping them in newspapers so that they would not explode when knocking against something.

When it was understood where these shells appeared, there was confirmation from those who participated in the Civil War of 1895 that they were taken from the palace grounds by the soldiers of the government while the Hawaiian troops were gathering at the outskirts of Diamond Head.

(Kuokoa, 3/8/1912, p. 1)

LOAA ELUA POKA MA KAPIOLANI

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLVIII, Helu 10, Aoao 1. Maraki 8, 1912.