Letters from Samoa, 1889.

Malietoa Arrives in Samoa!

Three-thousand Go to Meet Him with Gifts!
Important Correspondences!

Apia, Upolu, Samoa.

July 23, 1889.

John S. Kukahiko,

Much aloha between us.

I arrived on the 18th of June and am doing well.

Before I left Honolulu on the 7th of June, I went to your place often, thinking that perhaps we would meet one final time, but you weren’t at your place.

I’ve seen what’s new here and I have gone with Hairama Kaumialii to see the battlegrounds here in Samoa. All of their actions are admirable; they are a fearless people and true warriors. They are a loving and kind people. These are the most comely people I’ve seen throughout the world.

Each morning the King Mataafa attends Catholic Mass nearby where I live. And when he attends mass, he is accompanied by his fearless warriors very prepared, carrying weapons and firearms. They are very cautious [?? lili] in their protection of him; there is no enemy who is able to abduct him, lest he be abused.

The German and British warships are here in the port of Apia, but the Germans cannot try once again wage war and take him captive. Mataafa has fine features, and when he goes to pray, he and his guards are a magnificent sight to see. He is well regarded by the haole and his own people.

On the 22nd of this month, the American Consul and Admiral Kimberly bestowed upon him gifts from the President of the United States for them helping the Americans in Apia in the recent terrible storm. The Counsul and Admiral Kimberly gave speeches, and Mataafa gave a short reply which was printed in the newspaper, “Samoan Times.”

I’ve met fequently with Hairam Kaumialii, but where he lives is twelve miles away from here, in Malie. Continue reading