The Heens, and why we need to rescan the old Hawaiian newspapers, 1906.

A Festive Marriage with Honor

MR. and MRS. W. H. HEEN.

AMONGST delightful sprigs of white carnations blossoms entwined with delicate fronds of palai fern decorating the interior of the church of St. Andrew, the sacred matrimony between Miss Lily Notley and Mr. William H. Heen, Esq., of the Legal Profession of Hawaii, was held, and Rev. Fitz married the two of them in peaceful reverence. The young woman was escorted by Mrs. Leslie, and the young gentleman by his brother [hoa hanau], Mr. Afong Heen.

Charles Kahiliaulani Notley, the birth parent of the bride, gave his beloved lei upon the altar of matrimony, the foundation for one to live amongst the circle of those who live in proper and chaste families in this world.

The Gentlemen who attended to this assembly of friends were Mr. H. A. Kaulukou, associate of Mr. W. H. Heen in the legal profession; William Jordan and John Marcallino.

The woman was dressed in a wedding dress of white silk made with great skill; and the man was dressed in the usual attire for that occasion.

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William Haehae Heen faces racism from the United States, 1917.

RACISM.

A past issue of the Bulletin spread the news from Washington pertaining to W. H. Heen. The news being that the Senate is holding back their approval of Heen as Judge in place of Coke. The big reason behind this disapproval is that Heen is part Chinese [Hapa-pake]; where some Senators believe that this blood would not look well in a High Post in the Nation of the Unites States. How Astonishing! Continue reading

Another political mele for William Haehae Heen, 1923.

A MELE FOR WILLIAM HEEN.

Hoohie ka iini nou e Heen,
Loio kaulana a o ke Kalana.
Ua ike e ka lehulehu apau,
Ko naauao piha noeau.
Ua kohu pono oe ke noho mai,
[Unclear passage] ekahi ke ike aku.
Nou ia lei e lei mau ai,
I ka la 6 [?] a o Novemaba.
Ke Akua kahikolu kou kokua,
A puka loa oe a lanakila.
Haina ia mai ana ka puana,
No Wiliama Heen no he inoa.

[The dignified is the desire for you O Heen
Famous attorney of the County
All are aware
Of your knowledge filled with wisdom
[Unclear passage] is foremost to see
On the 6th [?] of November.
The Trinity is your aid,
And you will win the election.
Let the story be told,
The name song of Wiliama Heen.]

[This is just another of the many political mele for William Haehae Heen. This post was inspired by a post earlier this week by Nanea Armstrong-Wassel!]

(Kuokoa, 11/1/1923, p. 5)

MELE NO WILLIAM HEEN.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXII, Helu 44, Aoao 5. Novemaba 1, 1923.

Kuhio and the Hawaiian Civic Clubs. 1918.

THE PARTY OF HAWAIIANS  WAS FILLED WITH ENTHUSIASM

Hawaiians Gathered at the Young Hotel at the Invitation of Prince Kalanianaole

HEARD WAS IDEAS FOR UNIFICATION

Desired that Hawaiians Stand Together as a People

On the sixth floor of the Young Hotel, at noon this past Tuesday, the Hawaiians of this town gathered for the first time, for a luncheon amid enthusiasm and joy, and this will be a regular thing, like the haole regularly meet at noon on Wednesdays.

This was a meeting organized by Prince Kalanianaole, and Hawaiians of good standing who live here in town were invited to attend, without attention being paid to political affiliation; it is true, many Hawaiians came, and the total number was about seventy-one; and being that this is just the beginning, it will be more full in the future, should this gathering at lunch become a regular thing.

At this meeting was Prince Kalanianaole, the chairman of this meeting and luncheon, and also Mayor Fern, Circuit Judge Heen, Rev. Akaiko Akana, Senators John H. Wise and Charles E. King, Representative Kumalae, Sheriff Charles H. Rose, and some other Hawaiian leaders of town; and everyone gathered there that afternoon seemed spirited to stand shoulder to shoulder, chest to chest, in all things; to lift this lahui from the low level to be equal with the other ethnicities in all aspects.

In order to move forward the agenda for which the Hawaiians gathered at that luncheon, Prince Kalanianaole explained that he greatly wished that the Hawaiian people would think as one, and as a means to that ends, he believes that meeting together in one place by holding regular luncheons of that sort, is where you’d discuss things and hear explanation from different people on all questions regarding the well-being of Hawaiians.

“The great problem seen amongst us, as a people,” according to him, is that we don’t cooperate; we all stand independently, and when we want good works to be done, it is very hard to accomplish for we lack unity and strength.

“Unifying ourselves, and listening to people talk about things that will benefit this lahui is very important for the perpetuation of the lahui; and as we gather regularly at meals of this sort, we will become familiar with each other, and we will hear ideas that should be carried out, and we will be seen as a lahui.”

Some time was spent by Prince Kalanianaole explaining the goals of that gathering while his speech was encouraged by applause, then he called up Circuit Judge Heen to give a few words of clarification before the crowd.

According to him, he was not prepared with a clear topic to talk about, however, he was in agreement with Prince Kalanianaole; all Hawaiians must stand together and work as one in all endeavors that will better themselves as a lahui.

J. Ordenstein, John H. Wise, Charles Achi, Jr., Fred Beckley, Charles E. King, Charles Dwight, Mayor Fern, and Rev. Akaiko Akana were called to explain their overall thoughts as to what is to be done to benefit Hawaiians from here forth.

Rev. Akaiko Akana shared his thoughts; when Hawaiians go back to their traditional occupations [?] and cherish their way of life, that is the only way Hawaiians will be blessed.

The big problem with this lahui, according to him, is the lack of knowledge and readiness to go into business for themselves and so too with being economical; when these important things are acquired by Hawaiians, they will be able to climb to a high level.

Mr. Wise and Mayor Fern were some who spoke of their ideas on the question of leasing a building [?], and their ideas were heard with much enthusiasm.

Before the meeting was adjourned, one idea was approved, to draft a constitution for a club, and to place it in the hands of a committee to lay out the foundation and mission that this association of Hawaiians would carry out.

(Kuokoa, 11/29/1918, p. 1)

PIHA OHOHIA KA PAINA A NA KANAKA HAWAII

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LVI, Helu 48, Aoao 1. Novemaba 29, 1918.