Beginning of line-by-line commentary of “Aia i Honolulu kuu pohaku,” 1929.

EXPLANATION OF THE FIRST LINE.

1. Aia i Honolulu kuu pohaku

Kapanookalani’s thoughts:—This land Honolulu, it is close to Nanawale, Puna, by the sea. It is a ku, a small land in between large lands.

The stone [pohaku] is Lord [Haku] of the chiefess and in this word, the important idea is chiefess [‘lii wahine].

Kahapula’s thoughts:—Honolulu is on Oahu, where King Kamehameha V dwelt and those who opposed him is the Honolulu in this first line of the mele. It was here his enemies schemed and carried out all their defiant acts against him. While they knew the wish of the King to marry the chiefess Pauahi, her teacher, Amos Cooke secretly agreed to  Bishop for him to meet with Pauahi without the knowledge of her parents. That is how Pauahi became Bishop’s, and this is how Bishop and his relative Lee [? William Little Lee] became dignitaries of the land.

Kupihea’s thoughts:—Honolulu is a fish stone called a Kuula, and was brought here to this Honolulu [on Oahu] from the Honolulu of Puna [on Hawaii]. This Kuula was placed in the tiny land of Honolulu where an Alii called Honolulu lived, who was related to the chiefess Peleula, whose younger sister was the beautiful Waikiki. This place is mauka of the old Rawlin’s Estate. There is a bank of coral where Honolulu is; the fishing altar [Kuula] for the fish ponds [loko i’a] is on the Waikiki side of Liliha Street and between Vineyard and King Streets.

The stone is related to chiefs from times immemorial [mai ka po mai]. It is a manifestation made by God.

Iokepa’s thoughts:—Honolulu is a small land and a canoe landing makai of Nanawale, Puna, between two sand dunes, one on the Hilo side and one on the Puna side, called Puu Waawaa. From this Honolulu is called the Honolulu here [on Oahu] which used to be called Kou before, and after it was called Honolulu until this day.

This is the meaning for the word Honolulu:—The wind is very calm [lulu] an the sea is serene; it is very fine and peaceful. Bay [? Hono] of calm sea; Hono that is peaceful.

Kuluwaimaka’s thoughts:—The stone is related to Kamehameha V. Honolulu in Puna is a lowland next to the sea. Its width is perhaps half a mile long between Na Puu o Pele and Waiakahiula on the Hilo side. Honolulu is a place where you pick opihi [ku’i opihi] and pick limu [hana limu]. There is a fine spring [punawai] there and there is a foot path there.

[And to think that this is but the very beginning of Kelsey’s detailed account of the explanation of the six loea of the mele “Aia i Honolulu kuu pohaku.” This is just the first line! It continues in the following issues!!

One more (huge) reason that Hawaiian-Language Newspapers are priceless!!!]

(Alakai o Hawaii, 12/5/1929, p. 2)

NA MANAO WEHEWEHE MALUNA O KA LAINA EKAHI.

Ke Alakai o Hawaii, Buke 1, Helu 32, Aoao 2. Dekemapa 5, 1929.

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More on “Aia i Honolulu kuu pohaku”! 1929.

A MELE FOR KAMEHAMEHA V.

O Friends who chase after Ke Alakai o Hawaii, the mele, “Aia i Honolulu kuu pohaku,” is a mele of familiarity [mele hoolauna] composed by Luka Keelikolani when she was coming to here in Honolulu from Hilo to meet with King Kamehameha V.

From what is understood, it is believed that she composed this mele while she was in Hilo before her travelling to Oahu nei.

In this mele are hidden things dealing with the nation in the time of the alii Loka Kapuaiwa Kamakaiouli (Kamehameha V); the contention between the haole and the King, the deceit of the enemies of the King and their attempt to thwart the plans by the King and his court to make Pauahi his wife.

The Hale Hoonaauao Hawaii asks the native ones of the land, the old ones familiar with the history of King Kamehameha V, and the experts still living, to read with much pleasure the explanations of this mele as per what was obtained by the Hale Hoonaauao Hawaii from those native born of the land through the assistance of Theodore Kelsey.

The Hale Hoonaauao Hawaii will award a one-year subscription of the newspaper Ke Alakai o Hawaii to the one who sends the best letter with explanations on this mele. Send the letters to the office of Ke Alakai o Hawaii withing two weeks of the completion of the publishing of all that has been compiled.

Here is the mele and the explanations of the experts [loea] whose names are: Paulo Kealaikahiki Kapanookalani from whom we received this mele, Kahapula (Prof. Fred Beckley) who teaches at the University of Hawaii, Kawika Malo Kupihea who studied with the loea J. M. Poepoe for fifteen years. James Anania Iokepa who was born in Honomu, Hawaii, Rev. H. B. Nalimu who was born in Papaaloa, Hawaii in 1835, and J. P. Kuluwaimaka the skilled chanter [olohe oli] in the court of King Kalakaua.

[“Aia i Honolulu kuu pohaku” is perhaps the most widely studied mele i have seen, with line-by-line interpretations by experts of the day. It continues on for a number of issues of Alakai o Hawaii.

Does anyone have any details on the organization called Hale Hoonaauao Hawaii, or Hale Hoonaauao o Hawaii?]

(Alakai o Hawaii, 12/5/1929, p. 2)

HE MELE NO KAMEHAMEHA V.

Ke Alakai o Hawaii, Buke 1, Helu 32, Aoao 2. Dekemapa 5, 1929.

Kuhio and the Hawaiian Civic Clubs. 1918.

THE PARTY OF HAWAIIANS  WAS FILLED WITH ENTHUSIASM

Hawaiians Gathered at the Young Hotel at the Invitation of Prince Kalanianaole

HEARD WAS IDEAS FOR UNIFICATION

Desired that Hawaiians Stand Together as a People

On the sixth floor of the Young Hotel, at noon this past Tuesday, the Hawaiians of this town gathered for the first time, for a luncheon amid enthusiasm and joy, and this will be a regular thing, like the haole regularly meet at noon on Wednesdays.

This was a meeting organized by Prince Kalanianaole, and Hawaiians of good standing who live here in town were invited to attend, without attention being paid to political affiliation; it is true, many Hawaiians came, and the total number was about seventy-one; and being that this is just the beginning, it will be more full in the future, should this gathering at lunch become a regular thing.

At this meeting was Prince Kalanianaole, the chairman of this meeting and luncheon, and also Mayor Fern, Circuit Judge Heen, Rev. Akaiko Akana, Senators John H. Wise and Charles E. King, Representative Kumalae, Sheriff Charles H. Rose, and some other Hawaiian leaders of town; and everyone gathered there that afternoon seemed spirited to stand shoulder to shoulder, chest to chest, in all things; to lift this lahui from the low level to be equal with the other ethnicities in all aspects.

In order to move forward the agenda for which the Hawaiians gathered at that luncheon, Prince Kalanianaole explained that he greatly wished that the Hawaiian people would think as one, and as a means to that ends, he believes that meeting together in one place by holding regular luncheons of that sort, is where you’d discuss things and hear explanation from different people on all questions regarding the well-being of Hawaiians.

“The great problem seen amongst us, as a people,” according to him, is that we don’t cooperate; we all stand independently, and when we want good works to be done, it is very hard to accomplish for we lack unity and strength.

“Unifying ourselves, and listening to people talk about things that will benefit this lahui is very important for the perpetuation of the lahui; and as we gather regularly at meals of this sort, we will become familiar with each other, and we will hear ideas that should be carried out, and we will be seen as a lahui.”

Some time was spent by Prince Kalanianaole explaining the goals of that gathering while his speech was encouraged by applause, then he called up Circuit Judge Heen to give a few words of clarification before the crowd.

According to him, he was not prepared with a clear topic to talk about, however, he was in agreement with Prince Kalanianaole; all Hawaiians must stand together and work as one in all endeavors that will better themselves as a lahui.

J. Ordenstein, John H. Wise, Charles Achi, Jr., Fred Beckley, Charles E. King, Charles Dwight, Mayor Fern, and Rev. Akaiko Akana were called to explain their overall thoughts as to what is to be done to benefit Hawaiians from here forth.

Rev. Akaiko Akana shared his thoughts; when Hawaiians go back to their traditional occupations [?] and cherish their way of life, that is the only way Hawaiians will be blessed.

The big problem with this lahui, according to him, is the lack of knowledge and readiness to go into business for themselves and so too with being economical; when these important things are acquired by Hawaiians, they will be able to climb to a high level.

Mr. Wise and Mayor Fern were some who spoke of their ideas on the question of leasing a building [?], and their ideas were heard with much enthusiasm.

Before the meeting was adjourned, one idea was approved, to draft a constitution for a club, and to place it in the hands of a committee to lay out the foundation and mission that this association of Hawaiians would carry out.

(Kuokoa, 11/29/1918, p. 1)

PIHA OHOHIA KA PAINA A NA KANAKA HAWAII

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LVI, Helu 48, Aoao 1. Novemaba 29, 1918.