A mysterious story from Keaukaha, 1915.

A MYSTERIOUS RESTRAINT

Written in the English-language newspaper, Hawaii Herald of Hilo, was a truly strange story about some Hawaiian women here in Keaukaha, and here are some of what we translated.

On this past Christmas, Kawaikuhea and Elena, women who live in Keaukaha, went to pick opihi on a rocky island off of Keaukaha; they swam out for perhaps close to a hundred yards. Elena jumped into the water first and Waikuhea followed, but Waikuhea was the first to reach the rocky island and began to pick opihi, but while she was picking opihi, she heard the cry of Elena saying, “Auwe, I am dying. Aloha to [my] grandchildren.” Kawaikuhea¹ looked to where Elena was floating, and saw her floating easily upon the water. Seeing her friend floating there, Kawaikuhea spoke to Elena, “Hey you blundering woman, swim over here and I will help you”. Continue reading

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Beginning of line-by-line commentary of “Aia i Honolulu kuu pohaku,” 1929.

EXPLANATION OF THE FIRST LINE.

1. Aia i Honolulu kuu pohaku

Kapanookalani’s thoughts:—This land Honolulu, it is close to Nanawale, Puna, by the sea. It is a ku, a small land in between large lands.

The stone [pohaku] is Lord [Haku] of the chiefess and in this word, the important idea is chiefess [‘lii wahine].

Kahapula’s thoughts:—Honolulu is on Oahu, where King Kamehameha V dwelt and those who opposed him is the Honolulu in this first line of the mele. It was here his enemies schemed and carried out all their defiant acts against him. While they knew the wish of the King to marry the chiefess Pauahi, her teacher, Amos Cooke secretly agreed to  Bishop for him to meet with Pauahi without the knowledge of her parents. That is how Pauahi became Bishop’s, and this is how Bishop and his relative Lee [? William Little Lee] became dignitaries of the land.

Kupihea’s thoughts:—Honolulu is a fish stone called a Kuula, and was brought here to this Honolulu [on Oahu] from the Honolulu of Puna [on Hawaii]. This Kuula was placed in the tiny land of Honolulu where an Alii called Honolulu lived, who was related to the chiefess Peleula, whose younger sister was the beautiful Waikiki. This place is mauka of the old Rawlin’s Estate. There is a bank of coral where Honolulu is; the fishing altar [Kuula] for the fish ponds [loko i’a] is on the Waikiki side of Liliha Street and between Vineyard and King Streets.

The stone is related to chiefs from times immemorial [mai ka po mai]. It is a manifestation made by God.

Iokepa’s thoughts:—Honolulu is a small land and a canoe landing makai of Nanawale, Puna, between two sand dunes, one on the Hilo side and one on the Puna side, called Puu Waawaa. From this Honolulu is called the Honolulu here [on Oahu] which used to be called Kou before, and after it was called Honolulu until this day.

This is the meaning for the word Honolulu:—The wind is very calm [lulu] an the sea is serene; it is very fine and peaceful. Bay [? Hono] of calm sea; Hono that is peaceful.

Kuluwaimaka’s thoughts:—The stone is related to Kamehameha V. Honolulu in Puna is a lowland next to the sea. Its width is perhaps half a mile long between Na Puu o Pele and Waiakahiula on the Hilo side. Honolulu is a place where you pick opihi [ku’i opihi] and pick limu [hana limu]. There is a fine spring [punawai] there and there is a foot path there.

[And to think that this is but the very beginning of Kelsey’s detailed account of the explanation of the six loea of the mele “Aia i Honolulu kuu pohaku.” This is just the first line! It continues in the following issues!!

One more (huge) reason that Hawaiian-Language Newspapers are priceless!!!]

(Alakai o Hawaii, 12/5/1929, p. 2)

NA MANAO WEHEWEHE MALUNA O KA LAINA EKAHI.

Ke Alakai o Hawaii, Buke 1, Helu 32, Aoao 2. Dekemapa 5, 1929.

Shark attack, 1914.

GRUESOME DEATH BY A SHARK

This Sunday, Mar. 1—A Japanese and his son went to pick opihi [kui opihi] on the sea cliffs of Honomu, and while they were enjoying the opihi picking, the boy slipped and fell into the ocean, and before the father could do something for the child, the boy was taken by a huge black shark.

The body of that Japanese boy was held upwards in view of the father, and when it went back down into the ocean, the waist was severed, and with the second bite of that man-eating shark, the body of that unfortunate boy was completely gone. The actions done by that niuhi to that pitiful child is truly frightening.

(Hoku o Hawaii, 3/5/1914, p. 2)

MAKE MAINOINO I KA MANO
Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke 8, Helu 39, Aoao 2. Maraki 5, 1914.