Beginning of line-by-line commentary of “Aia i Honolulu kuu pohaku,” 1929.

EXPLANATION OF THE FIRST LINE.

1. Aia i Honolulu kuu pohaku

Kapanookalani’s thoughts:—This land Honolulu, it is close to Nanawale, Puna, by the sea. It is a ku, a small land in between large lands.

The stone [pohaku] is Lord [Haku] of the chiefess and in this word, the important idea is chiefess [‘lii wahine].

Kahapula’s thoughts:—Honolulu is on Oahu, where King Kamehameha V dwelt and those who opposed him is the Honolulu in this first line of the mele. It was here his enemies schemed and carried out all their defiant acts against him. While they knew the wish of the King to marry the chiefess Pauahi, her teacher, Amos Cooke secretly agreed to  Bishop for him to meet with Pauahi without the knowledge of her parents. That is how Pauahi became Bishop’s, and this is how Bishop and his relative Lee [? William Little Lee] became dignitaries of the land.

Kupihea’s thoughts:—Honolulu is a fish stone called a Kuula, and was brought here to this Honolulu [on Oahu] from the Honolulu of Puna [on Hawaii]. This Kuula was placed in the tiny land of Honolulu where an Alii called Honolulu lived, who was related to the chiefess Peleula, whose younger sister was the beautiful Waikiki. This place is mauka of the old Rawlin’s Estate. There is a bank of coral where Honolulu is; the fishing altar [Kuula] for the fish ponds [loko i’a] is on the Waikiki side of Liliha Street and between Vineyard and King Streets.

The stone is related to chiefs from times immemorial [mai ka po mai]. It is a manifestation made by God.

Iokepa’s thoughts:—Honolulu is a small land and a canoe landing makai of Nanawale, Puna, between two sand dunes, one on the Hilo side and one on the Puna side, called Puu Waawaa. From this Honolulu is called the Honolulu here [on Oahu] which used to be called Kou before, and after it was called Honolulu until this day.

This is the meaning for the word Honolulu:—The wind is very calm [lulu] an the sea is serene; it is very fine and peaceful. Bay [? Hono] of calm sea; Hono that is peaceful.

Kuluwaimaka’s thoughts:—The stone is related to Kamehameha V. Honolulu in Puna is a lowland next to the sea. Its width is perhaps half a mile long between Na Puu o Pele and Waiakahiula on the Hilo side. Honolulu is a place where you pick opihi [ku’i opihi] and pick limu [hana limu]. There is a fine spring [punawai] there and there is a foot path there.

[And to think that this is but the very beginning of Kelsey’s detailed account of the explanation of the six loea of the mele “Aia i Honolulu kuu pohaku.” This is just the first line! It continues in the following issues!!

One more (huge) reason that Hawaiian-Language Newspapers are priceless!!!]

(Alakai o Hawaii, 12/5/1929, p. 2)

NA MANAO WEHEWEHE MALUNA O KA LAINA EKAHI.

Ke Alakai o Hawaii, Buke 1, Helu 32, Aoao 2. Dekemapa 5, 1929.

Advertisements

Tsunami? 1862.

Turbulent Sea.

On Tuesday, the 28th of January, at Waialua, Molokai, exceptionally rough seas were seen, and there was much damage. The fish ponds from Moanui until Puako were smashed by the sea. The road at Honouliwai was dashed, and horses cannot  travel there. On the night of the 29th, there was a great earthquake, and the earth shook for eleven seconds. This is what was written in by M. Timoteo.

(Hoku o ka Pakipika, 2/20/1862, p. 2)

Kaikoo nui.

Ka Hoku o ka Pakipika, Buke I, Helu 22, Aoao 2. Feberuari 20, 1862.

New fishing laws for amaama (mullet), 1911.

Ban on Amaama.

There are many people in this Territory who donʻt know that they have been breaking the law since the first of this month, December; those law breakers are the owners of fish ponds, and those who sell amaama at markets. According to the law passed during this past Legislative Session of 1911, eating of amaama is banned from the 1st of December until the 1st of March.

Therefore, Attorney General Lindsay sent notice to the fish sellers at the markets that the sale of amaama over the counter will not be allowed anymore from next Tuesday on. Both ocean amaama and pond amaama are banned.

With this restriction on amaama during these months, there will be seen fish shortages in town on occasion in the future. It is known that during stormy times and when the sea is rough you canʻt get ocean fish. Amaama is a fish you can get all the time, in good and bad weather, and it is a favorite fish of the people.

This law prohibiting its sale to the public will make it disappear for several months before reappearing again. And dining tables in the upcoming holidays will be without this familiar fish of the land.

(Aloha Aina, 1/23/1911, p. 1)

KAPU KA AMAAMA.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke XVI, Helu 51, Aoao 1. Dekemaba 23, 1911.