Beginning of line-by-line commentary of “Aia i Honolulu kuu pohaku,” 1929.

EXPLANATION OF THE FIRST LINE.

1. Aia i Honolulu kuu pohaku

Kapanookalani’s thoughts:—This land Honolulu, it is close to Nanawale, Puna, by the sea. It is a ku, a small land in between large lands.

The stone [pohaku] is Lord [Haku] of the chiefess and in this word, the important idea is chiefess [‘lii wahine].

Kahapula’s thoughts:—Honolulu is on Oahu, where King Kamehameha V dwelt and those who opposed him is the Honolulu in this first line of the mele. It was here his enemies schemed and carried out all their defiant acts against him. While they knew the wish of the King to marry the chiefess Pauahi, her teacher, Amos Cooke secretly agreed to  Bishop for him to meet with Pauahi without the knowledge of her parents. That is how Pauahi became Bishop’s, and this is how Bishop and his relative Lee [? William Little Lee] became dignitaries of the land.

Kupihea’s thoughts:—Honolulu is a fish stone called a Kuula, and was brought here to this Honolulu [on Oahu] from the Honolulu of Puna [on Hawaii]. This Kuula was placed in the tiny land of Honolulu where an Alii called Honolulu lived, who was related to the chiefess Peleula, whose younger sister was the beautiful Waikiki. This place is mauka of the old Rawlin’s Estate. There is a bank of coral where Honolulu is; the fishing altar [Kuula] for the fish ponds [loko i’a] is on the Waikiki side of Liliha Street and between Vineyard and King Streets.

The stone is related to chiefs from times immemorial [mai ka po mai]. It is a manifestation made by God.

Iokepa’s thoughts:—Honolulu is a small land and a canoe landing makai of Nanawale, Puna, between two sand dunes, one on the Hilo side and one on the Puna side, called Puu Waawaa. From this Honolulu is called the Honolulu here [on Oahu] which used to be called Kou before, and after it was called Honolulu until this day.

This is the meaning for the word Honolulu:—The wind is very calm [lulu] an the sea is serene; it is very fine and peaceful. Bay [? Hono] of calm sea; Hono that is peaceful.

Kuluwaimaka’s thoughts:—The stone is related to Kamehameha V. Honolulu in Puna is a lowland next to the sea. Its width is perhaps half a mile long between Na Puu o Pele and Waiakahiula on the Hilo side. Honolulu is a place where you pick opihi [ku’i opihi] and pick limu [hana limu]. There is a fine spring [punawai] there and there is a foot path there.

[And to think that this is but the very beginning of Kelsey’s detailed account of the explanation of the six loea of the mele “Aia i Honolulu kuu pohaku.” This is just the first line! It continues in the following issues!!

One more (huge) reason that Hawaiian-Language Newspapers are priceless!!!]

(Alakai o Hawaii, 12/5/1929, p. 2)

NA MANAO WEHEWEHE MALUNA O KA LAINA EKAHI.

Ke Alakai o Hawaii, Buke 1, Helu 32, Aoao 2. Dekemapa 5, 1929.

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Another Wooden Kii found, 1868.

Akua Kii from Kalia.

Most of the people reading Ke Alaula have not seen an akua kii, but a small fraction have seen one, and some of you saw this image that is shown here in this issue. Last year, this god idol was found by the Honorable M. Kekuanaoa on the banks of a fish pond at Kalia in Paalaa Uka in Waialua. That large piece of wood was set down and covered with soil near the sluice gate of that large fish pond. When that big piece of wood was unearthed, lo and behold, it was a carved god. It was brought to Honolulu nei, and through the goodwill of the Alii Elder who owns Kalia fishpond, that kii was given to the college of Kapunahou [Punahou], and there it stands in the exhibition room of curiosities at Kapunahou. When some of you go to visit Kapunahou, ask the children there about the kii from Waialua, and it will be shown to you where it stands.

This kii was probably thrown into the pond of Kalia in the year 1819; that is the year when there was the kii of Hawaii nei were greatly abandoned. Some of them were burnt in fire and some were thrown into the sea.

These ohia wood images were worshiped by previous generations. The kupuna of the educated children of Waialua Sunday School were probably those that knelt down and worshiped this piece of wood.

How astonishing are the actions of the people of all of the pagan lands, who worship idols that are carved or molded by their own hands. That is how all lands are where the word of God has not reached.

Pieces of wood, fragments of rock, chunks of silver, chunks of metal, or perhaps chunks of iron turned into images—those are the gods cared for by millions of people, in heiau, houses of god, mountains, caves, banks of rivers, and in forests; they worship before them thinking that from these gods come well being, wealth, and life in body and spirit.

Here also is a picture of a Hindu man worshiping his godly image; it is a snake carved into a rock.

This is something that pains the heart to see the darkness and trouble of those that don’t know of the God the Savior, the one who came down to save all man. Because they don’t know him, they seek salvation from rocks and pieces of wood and from actions that hurt their very own bodies. When you pray, “Thy kingdom come,” remember the pagans so that the light reaches them quickly.

[Could this Akua Kii be the one now at the Bishop Museum which was found in Waialua and presented to Punahou?]

(Alaula, 1/1868, p. 39)

KE AKUA KII O KALIA.

Ke Alaula, Buke II, Helu 10, Aoao 39. Ianuari, 1868.