The latest from Hana, Maui, 1877.

News from Hana.

On the 21st of July, that being Saturday, on that day, Uaiwa fought with Wahine, both of them being contract laborers; they live at Oloewa, Hana, and Uaiwa stabbed Wahine with a knife in the cheek, and the reason for their quarrel is not known. Wahine is an actual cousin of Uaiwa, and here yet his temper soon flared up [pii koke ke kai o Kaihulua] and he lost his senses.

A fishing canoe pounded by a wave.—On Friday, the 3rd of August, Kekahawalu and his fishing canoe was hit by a wave right outside of Mokaenui and Makaalae. The canoe came ashore first carried by the waves, and as for Kekahawalu, he was pounded by the waves and escaped nearly dying; without receiving help from those on shore he would not have escaped.

Some wooden idols [kii laau].—On the 15th of August, brought by Momoa were a couple of amazing wooden images, along with one gourd calabash [hokeo] and some cordage [aho aha], to the Catholic teachers in Puuiki; there it was displayed, and the two of them are caring for them until this day. These old things were found by Welo in a hidden cave, seaside of Pukuilua, which was revealed to him in a dream, and was shown to him. The kii are made in the shape of people. It is said that these kii were procreative gods of the olden days, and were hidden away during the time that the god images of Hawaii nei were being destroyed. These old things have been hidden for fifty or more years, and it is the first time these revered things of the dark ages are being seen again.  L. K. N. Paahao.

(Kuokoa, 9/15/1877, p. 3)

Na mea hou o Hana.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XVI, Helu 37, Aoao 3. Sepatemaba 15, 1877.

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King Kalakaua gifts some 200 kii¹ to the National Academy of Sciences. 1887.

A Gift from the King.

The alii, the King, sent a number of beautiful pictures [kii] and old godly images [akua kii] of Hawaii to the hands of Mr. F. L. Clarke² in San Francisco, a gift from Him to the National Academy of Sciences [? ke kula ao Akeakamai o ia Repubalika]. There were a great many images sent which are well attested to as seen in the old accounts written by the great explorer Captain Cook and the faint recollections of those who have slight knowledge of that era.

The gift of the King was greatly appreciated and it was accepted with much thanks. When Queen Kapiolani arrived in San Francisco, she met with Mr. F. L. Clarke, the representative sent for this gift. There were two hundred or more images, from images that were printed on paper, to wooden idols. It’s been heard that they will go all the way to the city of Paris for the great exposition to be held next year.³

¹”Kii” refers to any image or representation of something, whether it be printed on paper, painted on canvas, carved out of wood, or cast in metal.

²See Clarke’s short history of Hawaii, “Hawaii’s Real Story,” which appeared in The Forum, July 1900, pp. 555–565.

³Exposition Universelle, 1889. See “Catalogue of the Hawaiian Exhibits at the Exposition Universelle, Paris, 1889.” by John A. Hassinger, Department of the Interior.

[Does anyone know of what happens to all of this?]

(Kuokoa, 5/14/1887, p. 2)

He Makana mai ka Moi aku.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXVI, Helu 20, Aoao 2. Mei 14, 1887.

I wonder what became of these… 1843.

OLD IDOLS OF HAWAII NEI.

I want some ancient idols [kii]; the idols that were worshiped in these islands before. Those who have the, bring them to me, and I will purchase them.

Armstrong [Limaikaika].

(Nonanona, 11/28/1843, p. 68)

KII KAHIKO O HAWAII NEI.

Ka Nonanona, Buke 3, Pepa 14, Aoao 68. Novemaba 28, 1843.

Niihau purchased for $10,800. 1864.

The Haole are Really Working Niihau.

O Kuokoa Newspaper; Aloha to you:—I met up with the newspaper article under News of Hawaii, in Issue 15 of the 9th of April, about the selling of Niihau to Mr. James Francis Sinclair, for $10,800, along with the lands of Kuakanu, which are the konohiki lands of Halewela and Kahuku, which the Government sold to the one named above, along with the konohiki lands, and this whole island has gone to the haole; perhaps you all and those others as well have heard that Niihau was sold, along with those penny-pinching folks who don’t get the shining beacon of Hawai nei through the Kuokoa Newspaper. And it is we who know of the great, who know of the small, and who know of the wide, that knows of the selling from Kii to Kawaihoa, from the Makahuena Point to Pueo Point; everything upon the land is bought and there is nothing left for us, the Hawaiians, under the haole owners.

Their Way of Living: They are pleasant and good, and speak nicely with the people, but they are not very proficient in the Hawaiian language. The haole say, “mahope aku kumaki” [?] There are ten Hawaiians, caretakers [hoaaina] of the land, chosen from amongst the locals, but two are from elsewhere, they are newcomers, one from Hawaii and the other from Maui, and including them there are ten caretakers. Here are each of their names which the haole selected: A. Puko, D. Kauki, Hetesia, J. H. Kanakaiki, P. R. Holiohana, H. Haokaku, Mose Kanohai, Ioela, Kapahee and Pouli; Kanakaiki is from Napoopoo, Hawaii, and Holiohana is from Hana, Maui, and are locals from there. Those caretakers are in charge of the three work days every month just like the konohiki of the chiefs, should there be work by haole owner to be done.

Their Number: Mr. James Francis Sinclair them total twelve in number; two brothers, three sisters, five children, one mother, and one in-law, which totals twelve; they live in Kununui; they are religious, with one God, but their religion is very different; their houses were constructed in Britain and brought to Niihau: three houses, one currently stands, and two more to follow; we appreciate how nice and beautiful it is to see.

Dealing with the Animals: There are two horses per man and woman, and should there be three, it is killed, and so forth; as for dogs, there are none left, they were all killed, from the big ones to the small ones because sheep were being killed, and so the government is without money from the dog tax, also the goats were all killed. You Kauai people who own horses and sheep, get them quick, don’t dawdle, or they will be taken by the haole.

Things Grown by the People.

The Hawaiians consume what they produce, and they also assist with the land owners in the watering of the sweet potato, ke pola akaakai [?], and chickens, as long as they were pleasant, or else that was that.

On the Number of Sheep

Set loose on Niihau are the sheep which you have perhaps seen in our Newspaper; as for the count, you probably have not heard; this is the truth as to the abundance or dearth: the number of sheep is 3,400, with 1,400 belonging to the Hon. W. Webster and 2,000 belonging to the King; there is no end to their desire for sheep.

Sugar Cane Cultivation.

Niihau will be planted with sugar cane if the test on one acre goes well; and if the cane grows nicely, then planting will commence, but if it doesn’t grow, that’s it, because it is an arid land.

This is an undesirable land for those foreigners seeking to make money because it is dry and scorched by the sun, and crops die; but here are people who are after wealth, and they tell us, the locals, that this is very valuable land for sheep and cane; our good friend, H. M. Whitney, the local of Waimea and Niihau, along with his parents, are familiar with this island and its extreme heat in the Makalii months [summer]. I will stop writing as the Naulu rain of Niihau is falling. With aloha.

P. R. Holiohana.

Kihalaui, Niihau, May 2, 1864.

[This P. R. Holiohana (later it seems he goes by the name P. R. Holi) writes in to the newspapers often from Niihau on a number of subjects.]

(Kuokoa, 6/4/1864, p. 1)

Hana io ka Haole ia Niihau.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke III, Helu 23, Aoao 1. Iune 4, 1864.

Another Wooden Kii found, 1868.

Akua Kii from Kalia.

Most of the people reading Ke Alaula have not seen an akua kii, but a small fraction have seen one, and some of you saw this image that is shown here in this issue. Last year, this god idol was found by the Honorable M. Kekuanaoa on the banks of a fish pond at Kalia in Paalaa Uka in Waialua. That large piece of wood was set down and covered with soil near the sluice gate of that large fish pond. When that big piece of wood was unearthed, lo and behold, it was a carved god. It was brought to Honolulu nei, and through the goodwill of the Alii Elder who owns Kalia fishpond, that kii was given to the college of Kapunahou [Punahou], and there it stands in the exhibition room of curiosities at Kapunahou. When some of you go to visit Kapunahou, ask the children there about the kii from Waialua, and it will be shown to you where it stands.

This kii was probably thrown into the pond of Kalia in the year 1819; that is the year when there was the kii of Hawaii nei were greatly abandoned. Some of them were burnt in fire and some were thrown into the sea.

These ohia wood images were worshiped by previous generations. The kupuna of the educated children of Waialua Sunday School were probably those that knelt down and worshiped this piece of wood.

How astonishing are the actions of the people of all of the pagan lands, who worship idols that are carved or molded by their own hands. That is how all lands are where the word of God has not reached.

Pieces of wood, fragments of rock, chunks of silver, chunks of metal, or perhaps chunks of iron turned into images—those are the gods cared for by millions of people, in heiau, houses of god, mountains, caves, banks of rivers, and in forests; they worship before them thinking that from these gods come well being, wealth, and life in body and spirit.

Here also is a picture of a Hindu man worshiping his godly image; it is a snake carved into a rock.

This is something that pains the heart to see the darkness and trouble of those that don’t know of the God the Savior, the one who came down to save all man. Because they don’t know him, they seek salvation from rocks and pieces of wood and from actions that hurt their very own bodies. When you pray, “Thy kingdom come,” remember the pagans so that the light reaches them quickly.

[Could this Akua Kii be the one now at the Bishop Museum which was found in Waialua and presented to Punahou?]

(Alaula, 1/1868, p. 39)

KE AKUA KII O KALIA.

Ke Alaula, Buke II, Helu 10, Aoao 39. Ianuari, 1868.

Wooden Kii found in Haleiwa, 1906.

[Found under: “This and That”]

Rev. W. D. Westervelt found a wooden akua image made of ohia that was 8 feet in length in a taro patch near the Haleiwa Hotel. This kalaipahoa was sent was sent to the museum of Kamehameha School.

(Na’i Aupuni, 8/30/1906, p. 3)

Ua loaa mai nei ia Rev W D Westervel...

Ka Na'i Aupuni, Buke II, Helu 76, Aoao 3. Augate 30, 1906.