The importance of mele, 1860.

Pertaining to Mele!

O PEOPLE THAT KNOW FINE MELE AND the old Mele, I want you all to send those Mele in, and some will be published in the Hae [Ka Hae Hawaii]; and some will be kept; for those things are valuable. The Philomathian Society [?? Ahahui ma na mea naauao]  at Punahou is wanting old Mele to put into their archives to be looked at at a later date. S. C. Armstrong [S. C. Limaikaika].

Editor of the Hae.

(Hae Hawaii, 3/21/1860, p. 203)

No na Mele

Ka Hae Hawaii, Buke 4, Ano Hou.—Helu 51, Aoao 203. Maraki 21, 1860.

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Marriage announcement outside of the Vital Statistics Column, 1912.

BOUND WITH THE THREE-STRAND CORD OF TRUE LOVE

Within the Anglican Church of St. Andrew’s, on this past Saturday evening, the youths, Miss Annabel Low and Albert Ruddle were joined together by the Rev. Leopold Kroll. The bride was donned with a white dress and a sheer veil, and atop her head was a lei of orange blossoms. She held a bouquet of flowers in her hand as seen in all marriage ceremonies, and she held a book of prayers in her hand. It was her father, Eben Low, who gave her into the care of her new parent, her husband. Misses Glorinda and Laura Low were the bride’s maids, and they held in their hands, bouquets of lavender roses. The best man was Mr. Kinegal, and the gentlemen in charge of hospitality were Stillman and Percy Deverill.

Miss Annabel Low who married Ruddle is the eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Low of this town. She was a student who graduated from the College of Kapunahou [Punahou] three years ago, and after some time in the teachers’ school, she was appointed as a teacher at a school on Hawaii Island, where she first met this man whom she wed, Mr. Ruddle, who is employed in a high position at the volcano. They will be returning to the Kanilehua of Hilo on Wednesday’s Mauna Kea where they will make their permanent home from here forth.

(Kuokoa, 7/12/1912, p. 6)

AWAIAULUIA ME KE KAULA KAAKOLU A KE ALOHA OIAIO

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLVIII, Helu 28, Aoao 6. Iulai 12, 1912.

Another Wooden Kii found, 1868.

Akua Kii from Kalia.

Most of the people reading Ke Alaula have not seen an akua kii, but a small fraction have seen one, and some of you saw this image that is shown here in this issue. Last year, this god idol was found by the Honorable M. Kekuanaoa on the banks of a fish pond at Kalia in Paalaa Uka in Waialua. That large piece of wood was set down and covered with soil near the sluice gate of that large fish pond. When that big piece of wood was unearthed, lo and behold, it was a carved god. It was brought to Honolulu nei, and through the goodwill of the Alii Elder who owns Kalia fishpond, that kii was given to the college of Kapunahou [Punahou], and there it stands in the exhibition room of curiosities at Kapunahou. When some of you go to visit Kapunahou, ask the children there about the kii from Waialua, and it will be shown to you where it stands.

This kii was probably thrown into the pond of Kalia in the year 1819; that is the year when there was the kii of Hawaii nei were greatly abandoned. Some of them were burnt in fire and some were thrown into the sea.

These ohia wood images were worshiped by previous generations. The kupuna of the educated children of Waialua Sunday School were probably those that knelt down and worshiped this piece of wood.

How astonishing are the actions of the people of all of the pagan lands, who worship idols that are carved or molded by their own hands. That is how all lands are where the word of God has not reached.

Pieces of wood, fragments of rock, chunks of silver, chunks of metal, or perhaps chunks of iron turned into images—those are the gods cared for by millions of people, in heiau, houses of god, mountains, caves, banks of rivers, and in forests; they worship before them thinking that from these gods come well being, wealth, and life in body and spirit.

Here also is a picture of a Hindu man worshiping his godly image; it is a snake carved into a rock.

This is something that pains the heart to see the darkness and trouble of those that don’t know of the God the Savior, the one who came down to save all man. Because they don’t know him, they seek salvation from rocks and pieces of wood and from actions that hurt their very own bodies. When you pray, “Thy kingdom come,” remember the pagans so that the light reaches them quickly.

[Could this Akua Kii be the one now at the Bishop Museum which was found in Waialua and presented to Punahou?]

(Alaula, 1/1868, p. 39)

KE AKUA KII O KALIA.

Ke Alaula, Buke II, Helu 10, Aoao 39. Ianuari, 1868.