Rev. Ella Wise Harrison visits Niihau, 1946.

Rebuttal.

Due to what was spread some time ago about Niihau people, like the Committee selected to watch Niihau. Those committees returned and submitted their report.

Rev. Ella Wise Harrison, the kahu of the Akua Ola Church, left for Niihau and spent three weeks there with family and friends. Continue reading

Kalai’s fame spreads to far away Pennsylvania, 1874.

[Found under: “Varieties.”]

King Kalakaua, of the Sandwich Islands, has requested an old woman named Kalai, who sent him a mat into which she had woven a petition praying for the removal of taxes on animals, to weave two mats, one with the American and the other with the English coat-of-arms, to be exhibited at our Centennial Exhibition as specimens of Hawaiian handiwork.

[There is mention of this also in the National Republican (Washington, DC) on 6/19/1874.]

(Juniata Sentinel and Republican, 6/24/1874, p. 1)

King Kalakaua...

Juniata Sentinel and Republican, Volume XXVIII, Number 25, Page 1. June 24, 1874.

The famous Niihau protest mat on display at the Bishop Museum, 1874 / 2015.

[Found under: “NOTES OF THE WEEK.”]

A Valuable Gift.—His Majesty received on Monday last a choice Niihau mat, presented to him by Mr. George Gay of Niihau. In this mat is wrought in red letters, a petition, praying that the taxes may be removed on all animals, and for other changes in the laws. The petition, which is in Hawaiian, is quite lengthy, and when copied off covered a page and a half of cap paper. It is the handiwork of an old woman named Kalai, who has been occupied 11 months in making it. She commenced it to give to the late Lunalilo, but on hearing of his death and the election of Kalakaua, sent it to the latter. His Majesty has requested her to work tow mats for the Philadelphia Centennial Exposition—one to show the American coat-of-arms and the other the British coat-of-arms, designs of which will be sent to her to copy. Should she execute the order, these will be very attractive specimens of Hawaiian handiwork.

—Some years ago a native brought to us a Niihau mat three fathoms in length and less than one in width, in which was wrought in red letters the Lord’s prayer in Hawaiian. It was beautifully done, and must have cost him many months of labor. We engaged to take it at his price, but before he delivered it, he found a customer who offered him just double what he had valued it at. Such specimens are very rare, and of course valuable. If made by days’ work, it would be valued at hundreds of dollars.

[This mat was put on display at the Bishop Museum just yesterday. Go check it out if you are on Oahu nei.]

(Hawaiian Gazette, 4/29/1874, p. 3)

A Valuable Gift.

Hawaiian Gazette, Volume X, Number 17, Page 3. Aprila 29, 1874.

Strong winds on Niihau, 1868.

[Found under: “NU HOU KULOKO.”]

Kauai.

Strong Winds.—M. W. Keale of Niihau told us that on the 3rd of this month, toppled over were nine buildings on Niihau, for there were two in Kamalino; two in Kiekie; one in Puuwai; and three in Kaumunui, one being a Protestant meeting house, one a Catholic meeting house, and one a private residence. And most of the other houses were tilted to the side by the dirt-stirring winds.

(Kuokoa, 10/24/1868, p. 3)

Kauai.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke VII, Helu 43, Aoao 3. Okatoba 24, 1868.

Niihau folks visiting Kauai and a mele for the famed Niihau shell lei , 1940.

[Found under: “Bits of News from Kauai”]

Kahelelani

Those lei blossoms, the momi of Niihau of Kahelelani, Mr. and Mrs. Niau, and their daughter Mrs. Miriam Hanaike and her daughters, have arrived, and they are spending their days gazing at the beauty of Manookalani [Kauai], the flower garden famous for the fragrance of Mokihana. They will return to the land famous for the Shell Lei [Lei Pupu].

Niihau O Kahelelani Hula

1. A he nani Niihau o Kahelelani, Ko lei pupu e kaulana nei.

2. Hoohihi ka manao la ilaila, I ka pua lei Momi o Kahelelani.

3. Aohe ou lua ae like ai, E kaulana nei a puni ka honua.

4. He nani hoi kou, Ua kaulana hooipo ia nei e ka nui manu.

5. Puana ka inoa ua lohe ia, Ko pua lei momi poina ole.

6. Haina ia mai a na ka puana, A he nani Niihau o Kahelelani.

(Your writer has composed these lines of poetry.)

[Abbie P. Palea had a regular column in Hoku o Hawaii, writing about various happenings on Kauai. She often wrote in with poetic compositions by her own hand. Here is just one of them. Although you will find credit given to Joseph Kelly (Keʻale), at the Bishop Museum’s Niihau Shell Lei Exhibit going on now (see it while you can!), i would suggest that because there seems to be no counter claims in later newspapers to Palea’s statement, that “Niihau o Kahelelani Hula” was indeed written by her.

There is so much to be learned from the old Hawaiian-Language Newspapers!]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 8/28/1940, p. 1)

Hoku o Hawaii, Volume XXXV, Number 18, Page 1. Aukake 28, 1940.

Mrs. A. P. Palea

Kahelelani

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Volume XXXV, Number 18, Page 1. Aukake 28, 1940.

More on the California Midwinter International Expo, 1894.

More Exhibits.

The Hawaiian Exposition Company will send another large shipment of exhibits to the Midwinter Fair by the Australia next Saturday. Among the things to be sent are native mats and tapa, poi boards and pounders, surf-boards, etc. Apu, the expert surf-rider from Niihau, will be among the twenty-five natives who will go up on the Australia. Mr. and Mrs. J. Ailau will take with them ten native women, who will make leis, fans and hats at the Fair.

(Hawaiian Gazette, 1/5/1894, p. 6)

More Exhibits.

Hawaiian Gazette, Volume XXIX, Number 2, Page 6. January 5, 1894.

Great Britain to buy Niihau? 1892.

[Found under: “LOCAL NEWS.”]

There has been much talk in the American newspapers about Great Britain, in that they received news that Britain is interested in purchasing Niihau, one of the islands of the Hawaiian Archipelago, and according to them, if it is true, this would be greatly go against the good will of some other major powers of Europe and America as well.

(Leo o ka Lahui, 9/29/1892, p. 2)

Nui ke kamailio o na nupepa...

Ka Leo o ka Lahui, Buke II, Helu 554, Aoao 2. Sepatemaba 29, 1892.

Population of Niihau and more, 1864.

The Population of Niihau.

O Kuokoa Newspaper; Aloha oe:—In response to the request by the Hoku Loa [newspaper], to tell the population of Niihau, and the number of houses of worship and members of the Lord’s church. Here is the actual figures of the population, from the men, women, older boys, younger boys, married women, and single women, the older girls and younger girls. Here is the chart.

Good-standing men, 187

Married women, 110

Single women, 29

Older boys [that can work?], 18

Younger boys, 50

Older girls, 27

Younger girls, 36

Breast-feeding children, 12

Old men, 51

Old women, 39

Male church members, 36

Female church members, 31

Total, 626

There are four houses of worship; three for the Protestants, and one for the Catholics. The shepherd of the sheep of the Protestants from Waimea, Kauai to Niihau, is Rev. G. B. Rovela [Rowell], and D. Maui and Anadarea are the assistant kahu. As per the requests for answers, will be responses. But there are some people who have gone here or there. This is the supplication of the boy from the west, and I am returning to my gardening of sweet potato scraps, as the Naulu rain came down.

P. R. Holiohana.

Kaununui, Niihau, May 19, 1864.

(Kuokoa, 6/11/1864, p. 4)

Ka nui o na kanaka ma Niihau.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke III, Helu 24, Aoao 4. Iune 11, 1864.

Niihau purchased for $10,800. 1864.

The Haole are Really Working Niihau.

O Kuokoa Newspaper; Aloha to you:—I met up with the newspaper article under News of Hawaii, in Issue 15 of the 9th of April, about the selling of Niihau to Mr. James Francis Sinclair, for $10,800, along with the lands of Kuakanu, which are the konohiki lands of Halewela and Kahuku, which the Government sold to the one named above, along with the konohiki lands, and this whole island has gone to the haole; perhaps you all and those others as well have heard that Niihau was sold, along with those penny-pinching folks who don’t get the shining beacon of Hawai nei through the Kuokoa Newspaper. And it is we who know of the great, who know of the small, and who know of the wide, that knows of the selling from Kii to Kawaihoa, from the Makahuena Point to Pueo Point; everything upon the land is bought and there is nothing left for us, the Hawaiians, under the haole owners.

Their Way of Living: They are pleasant and good, and speak nicely with the people, but they are not very proficient in the Hawaiian language. The haole say, “mahope aku kumaki” [?] There are ten Hawaiians, caretakers [hoaaina] of the land, chosen from amongst the locals, but two are from elsewhere, they are newcomers, one from Hawaii and the other from Maui, and including them there are ten caretakers. Here are each of their names which the haole selected: A. Puko, D. Kauki, Hetesia, J. H. Kanakaiki, P. R. Holiohana, H. Haokaku, Mose Kanohai, Ioela, Kapahee and Pouli; Kanakaiki is from Napoopoo, Hawaii, and Holiohana is from Hana, Maui, and are locals from there. Those caretakers are in charge of the three work days every month just like the konohiki of the chiefs, should there be work by haole owner to be done.

Their Number: Mr. James Francis Sinclair them total twelve in number; two brothers, three sisters, five children, one mother, and one in-law, which totals twelve; they live in Kununui; they are religious, with one God, but their religion is very different; their houses were constructed in Britain and brought to Niihau: three houses, one currently stands, and two more to follow; we appreciate how nice and beautiful it is to see.

Dealing with the Animals: There are two horses per man and woman, and should there be three, it is killed, and so forth; as for dogs, there are none left, they were all killed, from the big ones to the small ones because sheep were being killed, and so the government is without money from the dog tax, also the goats were all killed. You Kauai people who own horses and sheep, get them quick, don’t dawdle, or they will be taken by the haole.

Things Grown by the People.

The Hawaiians consume what they produce, and they also assist with the land owners in the watering of the sweet potato, ke pola akaakai [?], and chickens, as long as they were pleasant, or else that was that.

On the Number of Sheep

Set loose on Niihau are the sheep which you have perhaps seen in our Newspaper; as for the count, you probably have not heard; this is the truth as to the abundance or dearth: the number of sheep is 3,400, with 1,400 belonging to the Hon. W. Webster and 2,000 belonging to the King; there is no end to their desire for sheep.

Sugar Cane Cultivation.

Niihau will be planted with sugar cane if the test on one acre goes well; and if the cane grows nicely, then planting will commence, but if it doesn’t grow, that’s it, because it is an arid land.

This is an undesirable land for those foreigners seeking to make money because it is dry and scorched by the sun, and crops die; but here are people who are after wealth, and they tell us, the locals, that this is very valuable land for sheep and cane; our good friend, H. M. Whitney, the local of Waimea and Niihau, along with his parents, are familiar with this island and its extreme heat in the Makalii months [summer]. I will stop writing as the Naulu rain of Niihau is falling. With aloha.

P. R. Holiohana.

Kihalaui, Niihau, May 2, 1864.

[This P. R. Holiohana (later it seems he goes by the name P. R. Holi) writes in to the newspapers often from Niihau on a number of subjects.]

(Kuokoa, 6/4/1864, p. 1)

Hana io ka Haole ia Niihau.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke III, Helu 23, Aoao 1. Iune 4, 1864.