Restriction on fishing, 1922.

Notice of Tabu Fish.

By this, notice is given to all who sees this, as per what is designated in Section 614 of the Assembled Laws of Hawaii, 1915; I, the one named below, the owner of the fishery, known as the sea of “KEAUAU,” from the former property of the Alii William Charles Lunalilo, that being the sea in the Ili aina of Kapahulu, select and set aside for myself, an only for my own use, the fish called, “amaama,” from within those seas. All who take without my permission this fish that I make tabu, will be prosecuted.

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New fishing laws for amaama (mullet), 1911.

Ban on Amaama.

There are many people in this Territory who donʻt know that they have been breaking the law since the first of this month, December; those law breakers are the owners of fish ponds, and those who sell amaama at markets. According to the law passed during this past Legislative Session of 1911, eating of amaama is banned from the 1st of December until the 1st of March.

Therefore, Attorney General Lindsay sent notice to the fish sellers at the markets that the sale of amaama over the counter will not be allowed anymore from next Tuesday on. Both ocean amaama and pond amaama are banned.

With this restriction on amaama during these months, there will be seen fish shortages in town on occasion in the future. It is known that during stormy times and when the sea is rough you canʻt get ocean fish. Amaama is a fish you can get all the time, in good and bad weather, and it is a favorite fish of the people.

This law prohibiting its sale to the public will make it disappear for several months before reappearing again. And dining tables in the upcoming holidays will be without this familiar fish of the land.

(Aloha Aina, 1/23/1911, p. 1)

KAPU KA AMAAMA.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke XVI, Helu 51, Aoao 1. Dekemaba 23, 1911.