S. M. Kamakau on history, 1868.

Letter from Mr. Kamakau.

To all Literary Gentlemen and Friends in Hawaii and elsewhere:

A certain person, styling himself in the Gazette, “A Hawaiian,” and whom I judge to be the same who signs himself in the Au Okoa “R. Kapihe,” and who, moreover, I doubt not,is one aspiring to a very high rank in the Kingdom, seems very jealous of my statements in the Hawaiian History which I am now writing. The line of descent of some of the present high chiefs, and their relationship to Kamehameha I, as I have stated it, appears to find especial disfavor in his eyes, perhaps and very probably, for the reason that another name very near at home to the above-mentioned writer is not included among those whom I have written down as descendants and near of kin to Kamehameha I. Continue reading

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Picture of Kamaiko Heiau in 1908.

THE HEIAU OF KAMAIKO, NEAR NAPOOPOO, WHERE A. GARTLEY AND C. H. COOKE RECENTLY DISCOVERED THE SKULLS OF PRIEST AND THEIR FOLLOWERS SAID TO HAVE BEEN EXECUTED AT THE HEIAU ABOUT THE TIME THE TABUS WERE ABOLISHED.

(PCA, 3/25/1908, p. 1)

PCA_3_25_1908_1

The Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume XLVII, Number 7995, Page 1. March 25, 1908.

Kamaiko Heiau story in the PCA, 1908.

GRIM RELICS OF HUMAN SACRIFICE ARE DISCOVERED

A. Gartley and C. H. Cooke Find Many Skulls and Skeletons at the Kamaiko Heiau in Kona, All in Good Preservation.

A Gartley and C. H. Cooke made a most interesting discovery in connection with the Kamaiko heiau of the district of Keei, in South Kona, on their recent visit to the Big Island. Continue reading

Iwi in Kamaiko Heiau, 1908.

BONES FOUND IN HEIAU

At Keei, Kona, Found were Many Human Skulls and Bones.

Upon the return of Mr. A. Gartley and C. H. Cook [C. H. Cooke] from their excursion to South Kona, Hawaii, they said that when they went to look at Kamaiko Heiau at Keei, they found many human bones in the heiau.

It is conjectured that the reason there are many human skulls and their bones there is because their lives were sacrificed in this heiau when the kapu system [ka noho ame ka ai kapu ana] was abolished. Continue reading

Kapu on Queen Liliuokalani’s ocean at Hamohamo, 1906.

Proclamation of Prohibition!

ANNOUNCING so that all may hear who go swimming or fishing perhaps at the Sea of Hamohamo at Waikiki Kai, Honolulu, Oahu; Queen Liliuokalani prohibits: There is to be no collecting of Pakeleawaa Seaweed, and Huluhuluwaena Seaweed, Opihi, Alealea Shellfish, Ina, Haueue [Haukeuke], and Pipipi, facing the front of the Royal Yard [Pa Alii]. It was her very own Royal hands which planted and fostered all of those things mentioned above, and those who take these Restricted things will be arrested and punished by the law. All of these things planted by the Queen, some were brought from Hilo, and some from Lahaina, some from Molokai, some from Kauai, and some were from here in Waialua, Oahu.

Heed this Restriction.

J. O. Carter, Agent.

Honolulu, T. H., Mar. 1, 1906.

(Na’i Aupuni, 3/26/1906, p. 3)

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Ka Na’i Aupuni, Buke I, Helu 102, Aoao 3. Maraki 26, 1906.