Armstrong loses Paki’s genealogy, 1856.

LOST GENEALOGY.

I STATE that when A. Paki died, someone wrote down his genealogy, and gave it to me to publish in the Elele, and because of its great length, it was not published at the time. Continue reading

The Ninth Independence Day, 1852.

Chamberlain’s Notice.

The public are hereby notified that Sunday, the 28th of this month, being the ninth Anniversary of the Joint-Declaration of Great Britain and France to respect the independence of this Kingdom, the day will be kept on Monday, the 29th, as a holiday in the usual manner.

Their Majesties, the King and Queen will hold Court in the Palace at half past 7 o’clock, in the evening, whereat there will be a public reception.

Strangers, (Ladies or gentlemen) desirous of being presented, are requested to bring with them cards signed by the Consuls of their several nations.

A. PAKI

Chamberlain’s Office, Nov. 12, 1852.

[The 9th anniversary of La Kuokoa was celebrated under the reign of King Kamehameha III, Kauikeaouli and Queen Kapakuhaili.]

(Polynesian, 11/20/1852, p. 110)

Chamberlain's Notice.

The Polynesian, Volume 9, Number 28, Page 110. November 20, 1852.

More on Liliu’s marriage, 1862.

I was engaged to Mr. Dominis for about two years and it was our intention to be married on the second day of September, 1862. But by reason of the fact that the court was in affliction and mourning, our wedding was delayed at the request of the king, Kamehameha IV., to the sixteenth of that month; Rev. Dr. Damon, father of Mr. S. M. Damon, at present the leading banker of the Islands, being the officiating clergyman. It was celebrated at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. Bishop, in the house which had been erected by my father, Paki, and which, known as the Arlington Hotel [Haleakala], is still one of the most beautiful and central of the mansions in Honolulu. To it came all the high chiefs then living there, also the foreign residents; in fact, all the best society of the city.

[This is what Queen Liliuokalani had to say about her marriage in Hawaii’s Story by Hawaii’s Queen, first published in 1898. Mahalo to Heather Wilkinson Rojo for her response on the previous post, saying she posted an image of their marriage certificate on her blog. This is one of the many priceless treasures cared for by the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum!]

(Hawaii’s Story by Hawaii’s Queen, 1988. p. 22.)