Mafia? 1893.

AN AMERICAN MAFIA.

“The Queen never will be restored to the throne, for she will be shot within 24 hours, and every man who takes office under her will be shot also—we have men secretly sworn to do it.”

Such was the remark made to the writer by a brainless young sprig of the “citizens reserve,” such is the tenor of numerous open threats of the canaille composing the annexation club, the citizens reserve and the American league organizations that pretending to be patriotically American are in fact veritable nests of socialism, fenianism and mafia.

To their shame be it said that these mafias are organized under men calling themselves Americans, men who heretofore have been regarded as respectable and intelligent citizens: Hatch, Castle, Wilder, Jones, Smith, McGrew, Emerson, and so on, whose names will pass into history as knavish pirates in a plot to steal a nation and compel America to receive the stolen goods.

A recent article in the Holomua warned that a wave of insanity had struck Honolulu in accordance with a well known theory of cycles. The malady appears to be growing worse, for certain it is, that all the men and women concerned in the overthrow of the Queen, the terrorism and misgovernment of a P. G. military despotism, and the present display of hostilities against the United States, all act like people demented. Continue reading

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More on Moanalua Park, 1899.

MOANALUA PARK.

As long as Minister Damon [Damana] has been in possession of Moanalua, his desire to beautify, ornament, and to clean up the area has been increasing.

He is planting roses and vines of all sorts and these are growing and increasing inside and outside of the glass houses with their blossoming fragrant blossoms.

There are many people constructing new roads; one will be for the island which will be close to the house and one will go up to Alia Paakai.

Its beauty is intensifying every day. Mr. Damon will continue to bring in plants and fruits from other lands to adorn this Home of his, and it will please the eyes of those who visit.

(Lahui Hawaii, 3/25/1899, p. 5)

MOANALUA PA-KA.

Ka Lahui Hawaii, Buke 1, Helu 9, Aoao 5. Maraki 25, 1899.

Visitors to Moanalua Park, 1898.

GROUP OF VISITORS AT MOANALUA.

There was a truly great number of people who arrived in Moanalua, on the evening of last Saturday, to share in the delightful welcome extended by Minister Damon and Mrs. S. M. Damon. Some came by train, some came up by horse-drawn carriage. The reception began from 3 o’clock in the afternoon until 6 o’clock or so.

This was an unforgettable gathering to all who assembled there.

(Kuokoa, 10/7/1898, p. 3)

KE ANAINA HOOKIPA MA MOANALUA.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXXVII, Helu 40, Aoao 3. Okatoba 7, 1898.

More on Liliu’s marriage, 1862.

I was engaged to Mr. Dominis for about two years and it was our intention to be married on the second day of September, 1862. But by reason of the fact that the court was in affliction and mourning, our wedding was delayed at the request of the king, Kamehameha IV., to the sixteenth of that month; Rev. Dr. Damon, father of Mr. S. M. Damon, at present the leading banker of the Islands, being the officiating clergyman. It was celebrated at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. Bishop, in the house which had been erected by my father, Paki, and which, known as the Arlington Hotel [Haleakala], is still one of the most beautiful and central of the mansions in Honolulu. To it came all the high chiefs then living there, also the foreign residents; in fact, all the best society of the city.

[This is what Queen Liliuokalani had to say about her marriage in Hawaii’s Story by Hawaii’s Queen, first published in 1898. Mahalo to Heather Wilkinson Rojo for her response on the previous post, saying she posted an image of their marriage certificate on her blog. This is one of the many priceless treasures cared for by the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum!]

(Hawaii’s Story by Hawaii’s Queen, 1988. p. 22.)