Hawaiians deported from Samoa, 1891.

Hawaiians From Samoa

Aboard the steamship Zealandia which landed this past Saturday, these Hawaiian friends came back from Samoa due to the deportation proclamation by King Malietoa, and their passage was paid for by funds from the Legislature which was set aside. Here are their names: Kimo Kukona and wife, Kawelu and wife, Kaolola, Kaluna, Moanalua, and Kahinu. They said that life in those islands was comfortable, and suitable for the health, but they could not stay long because of King Malietoa’s deportation order. There is much leprosy spreading there.

Hairama Kaumialii and Mose wed Samoan wives. The latter named is a sailor on the Kaimiloa who abandoned ship at Samoa. They both will return under the deportation law. Kauaua, a sailor from the Kaimiloa who fled, assimilated to the Samoan way of life, and is covered in a tattoo. These are the Hawaiians who remained and are preparing to return: Mose, Kaliko, Kauaua, Keoni, A. B. Kaaukuu, Mrs. Maria, Lui, Mrs. Akahi, Luna, Miss Kalua, Mrs. Kaulahao, Kanaauao, Kamaka, Kauaki, Meekue, and Hailama Kaumialii. As for James Keau, he is well off, living in the islands of Tonga, and is far from the authority of this expulsion order by King Malietoa.

[If some of my posts look familiar to some of you, they are being reposted from my old Hoolaupai Facebook page. They cannot be easily found on that page, and that was one of the major reasons for starting this one. Here at least i can do tags and categories, and hopefully that makes them easier to find. Google also does a pretty good job of making them searchable!]

(Kuokoa, 1/17/1891, p. 2)

NA HAWAII MAI SAMOA

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXX, Helu 3, Aoao 2. Ianuari 17, 1891.

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More on Moanalua Park, 1899.

MOANALUA PARK.

As long as Minister Damon [Damana] has been in possession of Moanalua, his desire to beautify, ornament, and to clean up the area has been increasing.

He is planting roses and vines of all sorts and these are growing and increasing inside and outside of the glass houses with their blossoming fragrant blossoms.

There are many people constructing new roads; one will be for the island which will be close to the house and one will go up to Alia Paakai.

Its beauty is intensifying every day. Mr. Damon will continue to bring in plants and fruits from other lands to adorn this Home of his, and it will please the eyes of those who visit.

(Lahui Hawaii, 3/25/1899, p. 5)

MOANALUA PA-KA.

Ka Lahui Hawaii, Buke 1, Helu 9, Aoao 5. Maraki 25, 1899.

Visitors to Moanalua Park, 1898.

GROUP OF VISITORS AT MOANALUA.

There was a truly great number of people who arrived in Moanalua, on the evening of last Saturday, to share in the delightful welcome extended by Minister Damon and Mrs. S. M. Damon. Some came by train, some came up by horse-drawn carriage. The reception began from 3 o’clock in the afternoon until 6 o’clock or so.

This was an unforgettable gathering to all who assembled there.

(Kuokoa, 10/7/1898, p. 3)

KE ANAINA HOOKIPA MA MOANALUA.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXXVII, Helu 40, Aoao 3. Okatoba 7, 1898.

Moanalua: Mele, Moolelo, and Mokumaia, 1922.

[From: “MOANALUA I KELA AU A O MOANALUA I KEIA AU.”]

O Moanalua haki ke au,
I Kahauiki hemo ka umoki
I ke kula loa hoi o Kalihi,
I Kaiwiula kikiipau,
Kapalama lo’i laiki,
I Keoneula malu ke kiawe,
Leleo i ka lokowai,
Haaliliamanu honi kaua,
Kapuukolo i ka Nekina,
Hololio laau me ka huapala,
Kamanuwai moa liilii,
Hauna ke kai eha oe ia’u,
Hainaia mai ana ka puana,
Moanalua au ha’i ke au.

He mau hiona no Moanalua...

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXI, Helu 35, Aoao 3. Augate 31, 1922.

Some scenes of Moanalua:—The picture on the left is the Valley of Manaiki, where the royal assassins lived. The picture on the top on the right is Mrs. J. K. Mokumaia, and below is the Waialamihi Pond.

[This version of “Moanalua” is taken from a long-running column written by J. K. Mokumaia, a long-time resident of the area, on the history of Moanalua, which he called “Moanalua of the past and Moanalua of the Present.” This series which includes many priceless photographs like those above (which will be seen much more clearly when the newspapers are scanned properly) ran in the Kuokoa from 2/17/1922 until 8/31/1922 (although unfinished, it seems to end on this date).]

O Moanalua haki ke au...

O Moanalua haki ke au…

(Kuokoa, 8/31/1922, p. 3)

More on Emalia Kaihumua out and about, 1901.

Sweet Emalia and Moanalua.

Their Problems Before the Court

Moanalua is a youth that we often see with a woman’s necklace all the time, and a women’s pocketbook. He is somewhat feeble-minded, and is always smiling. Moanalua is the name that people know him by, but his real name is something else.

He was arrested for stealing a suit and a pair of slacks from Keoki Woolsey’s place in Waikiki. He did not want a lawyer, and did not want to contest his guilt, and his case is left for the circuit court.

As for Sweet Emalia, she was enjoying the tasty water, swipe [suaipa], and after being filled with this intoxicating liquid, she went along with the two aikane, Kapahu and John Richard [?] on a car ride, in the evening of this past Sunday. The horse was exerted as they sped along King Street, and from the car came that song often heard from children on the streets, “There’ll be a hot time, in the old town, tonight.” This car was seen by a policeman as it sped on crazily, and he called out to stop, but the driver misheard and thought he was being told to speed up; and when the were caught, all the steam was exhausted from the horse resulting from it being run hard. Sweet Emalia and her riding companions were taken to jail [Halewai], and there she entertained the peace officers with her funny antics.

That Emalia was detained with another woman in a single room, and it wasn’t long when they began to display their skill in boxing. The rumbling of the earth was heard, and it was three large officers that separated the two women fighters.

Sweet Emalia was fined $12, and her fellow joy riders were each fined $2.00. Another suit was filed for injuring her companion, but it was dismissed.

(Kuokoa, 10/4/1901, p. 5)

O Sweet Emalia me Moanalua.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXXIX, Helu 14, Aoao 5. Okatoba 4, 1901.

Moanalua, then and now, 1922.

MOANALUA PAST AND MOANALUA PRESENT.

(Written by J. K. Mokumaia)

(Continued)

[This is from a serial column on stories about Moanalua. At the close of the previous installment, Mokumaia is speaking about Waiapuka and evidence of a large population…]

So too a well-built rock platform, it is like a heiau; and so too a huge cave large enough for a hundred people to live; and so too perhaps a small cave enough for a single person to live as a lookout, looking out at Moanalua, where the oncoming enemies would be plain in sight.

In my estimation, its height above sea level is 500 and a half feet, and this valley was an important one to the people, and was called Kamanaiki, and there is the famous hill Puukapu.

It is said that this was a place where the alii and people got together to discuss an important problem, and it will be be clear through your writer, those things integrally related to this hill and why it is famous; being that this hill is very close to where passing travellers were waylaid at night.

Therefore, dear readers of my fond Kilohana (a frequently used appellation for the newspaper Kuokoa, coming from its subtitle “Ke Kilohana Pookela no ka Lahui Hawaii” [The Greatest Prize of the Hawaiian Nation]), I am taking this little entertainment back to the time when Kaleiluhiole was ruling as konohiki, where this story gets its basis.

Kaleiluhiole’s total area of management went all the way to Makua, Waianae and back, when he made his tour, he would start at Moanalua and take a respite at Makua, staying there for some anahulu (a period of 10 days), and then turn back; going along on these tours were his workers as well as those who entertained on the trips so that everyone amongst his travelling companions was filled with the constant promise of merriment.

When the konohiki stayed there, items from the seaside were prepared by the natives, and so too the fruits of the land; being that his word had power, it was necessary to prepare all these things; and the important man during those times as heard by your writer was the one called Kihikihi; this gentleman was lame, but his  mind however was filled with all sorts of ideas that benefited him.

He owned a number of schooners, and from amongst his servants, there is one still alive in Waianae, that being Mr. Hui; they went around with the father of your writer, being that my father was a captain of the vessels belonging to Kihikihi, who was also the grandfather of your writer.

The basis for this discussion was that when the Konohiki stayed in Makua it was a regular thing that entertainment was provided for him; and from amongst these entertainments, was a hula troupe headed by Mahoe; this hula leader was from Kauai,  and when he was joined by the beauty of Makua, that hula performance of his—the hips of that hula leader were pressed by that beauty of Makua; quiet your breathing at the whispering seas of that land, as your eyes will  grow dizzy watching [?].

My father was also one who belonged to this hula troupe, and when the konohiki made his return, until reaching his usual lands, that being Moanalua, it was customary for him, were it extremely long, for everyone to be filled with happiness, and this happiness was what was witnessed when that hula troupe was joined by Moanalua’s, which was headed by Keoni Paakaula, and hula students got together, and thus appeared your writer; from what is known, this travelling was the foundation from which a brought forth its garden and came the year spoken previously of by the writer, when thought first came to him.

Looking at how the konohiki and people lived, it was quite fun; this was a land of people and food aplenty.

(To be continued.)

The picture above is the grounds on which was the structure where festivities were held. The picture below is of a great taro patch where the fish from California [i’a Kaleponi?] was set loose.

This is a picture of Keoni Paakaula, the old kumu hula of Moanalua, who is 102 years old.

[This serial by J. K. Mokumaia begins on 2/17/1922 and might end on 8/31/1922 (although there is indication that it is not completed).]

(Kuokoa, 3/10/1922, p. 6)

MOANALUA I KELA AU I HALA, A O MOANALUA I KEIA AU.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXI, Helu 10, Aoao 6. Maraki 10, 1922.