Death of Maraea Pomaikai Kamakahiki, 1870.

[Found under: “NU HOU KULOKO: Maui.”]

Plucked by death.—We received news that on the 18th of March, at Keanae, Mrs. Maraea Pomaikai Kamakahiki left this life, and was taken by the cruel-handed messenger of death, in her old age living in this unfamiliar world. She was a Christian woman, and died as a good and proper servant for the Lord in which she had faith. Here is a short story about her. In the year 1855, the two of them left their land of birth and sailed to the small islands of Micronesia where they served as Missionaries for the Almighty, Continue reading

Chinese New Year beer ad, 1907.

To troubles that are past!
‘Tis well they didn’t last;
Our Chinese cooks had fun,
But we, alas! had none—
Cold joints are good enough,
But oh! we like “hot stuff,”
No skittles and no beer,
For us, Chinese New Year.

“Life is not all beer and skittles”—
But it will be if we drink

RAINIER.

It’s all right Sir
it’s
Rainier

C. A. Nelson, Agt.  Phone Main 1331

(Evening Bulletin, 2/18/1907, p. 5)

EveningBulletin_2_18_1907_5.png

Evening Bulletin, Volume IX, Number 3619, Page 5. February 18, 1907.

Primo across the sea, 1912.

Making PRIMO PALE

A Hawaii Industry

Honolulu has the best beer in the world—because Honolulu has the best facilities for producing the best beer in the world. Primo Pale is the product of the

HONOLULU BREWING AND
MALTING COMPANY

Island consumers demand good beer, and no other brewing company found in the celebrated breweries of Milwaukee, together with Charles G. Bartlett, for many years manager of the Honolulu Brewing and Malting Company, belongs the credit of giving the island of Hawaii this most modern brewery and the highest quality of beer produced there. To prove this statement—

When in Honolulu Aks for… PRIMO PALE

[The issue of the SF Call that this advertisement appears in is the Hawaiian Publicity Edition, sixteen pages of articles and pictures dealing with Hawaii nei.]

(San Francisco Call, 8/14/1912, p. 6)

Making PRIMO PALE

The San Francisco Call, Volume CXII, Number 75, Page 6. August 14, 1912.

Honolulu Brewing and Malting Company, 1900.

The Brewery

You’ll Drink Until Satiated—The Workers are Rushing So It Can Start Up Soon.

The employees of the “Honolulu Brewing Company” are speedily putting in the finishing touches on the brewery on Queen Street.

This is one of the largest endeavors seen in Honolulu in a long time. There have been many large stone buildings built, and some other structures as well for work related to this brand-new undertaking.

The ice factory is three stories tall, and within the same building will be stored the beer kegs.

There are two bright haole who are assembling the machinery and they believe their work will be completed in the next few weeks.

(Kuokoa, 8/24/1900, p. 5)

KA HALE HANA BIA.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXXVIII, Helu 32, Aoao 5. Augate 24, 1900.

Kaipoleimanu, okolehao, place names, and such, 1895 / 2014.

KAIPOLEIMANU.

This Tuesday, Captain Kalei of the Schooner Rob Roy, which is a schooner travelling between Honolulu nei and Molokai, was arrested for having an Okolehao jug containing liquor; there were a great many officers sent to the seaside to arrest the Captain of the schooner.

There was much found in a dark room: four gin jugs, two Whiskey jugs, but the majority found were bottles that were empty with no whiff of Okolehao.

One of the sailors of this ship, distanced himself with a dismal look on his face, and another scratched his head while looking pale.

When it was clear to an officer that he saw alcohol was brought into Honolulu town to be sold, and because of orders received by the officers, should there be a person or persons that were confirmed to have alcohol, they were to be taken to Jail [Halewai], that indeed is what happened as per what was ordered; and the officers and some others went along to the Jailhouse while bringing in a Demijohn [“basketry filled with a bottle”] containing some Okolehao; there was the stench of Ipoleimanu, and this made us recall these lines of mele.

He manao he aloha,
No Kaipoleimanu,
He manu ku’u hoa,
Noho mai ka nahele,
Iiwi a o uka,
Polena i kaua,
Ua ao Hanalei,
Anu au maeele,
[Ua anu hoi au
I ka ua noe anu
Na hau o Maihi
Au ana i ke kai
Na ulu o Weli
Punohu mai ana
E mapu mai ana
Ke ala o ka Hala
Hala o Mapuana
Honi ana i ka ihu
Ke ala pua rose
Hooheno i kuu poli
Naue kuu kino
Ko hiki ana mai
Haina ia ka puana
No ka ipo leimanu.]

¹Kaipoleimanu was during this time a slang for okolehao.

[I took a step back from “Hawaii’s Story,” but not too far. This mele by Queen Kapiolani for her King Kalakaua, Kaipoleimanu, is still widely sung today. But who today still knows that along with Hanalei, Maihi, Weli, and Mapuana, that Kaipoleimanu is a place on Kauai. In a Hawaii where we are so used to places called Diamond Head, Pearl City, Bowls, Sunset, Yokohama, and the like, is there value in re-membering more traditional names?

On that note, before i take some time away from these posts, i thought i would try a little survey. If you have the time, please think about the question rationally, then choose an answer or add one of your own. And as always, do feel free to leave comments in the box all the way at the bottom.]

(Oiaio, 8/23/1894, p. 3)

KAIPOLEIMANU.

Nupepa Ka Oiaio, Buke VII, Helu 25, Aoao 3. Augate 23, 1895.

Tragic follow up to Emalia Kaihumua, 1906.

BEAT HIS WIFE AND THE WIFE WAS AFFLICTED BY THE SEPARATING DISEASE.

This past Sunday, January 28th, the husband of Emalia Kaihumua beat her and her jaw was dislocated, because she was struck with a wine bottle. That woman was taken to Kuapapanui, and tended to.

Later, Dr. McDonald of the Board of Health came and examined the injury, and after his examination of some of the flesh of that woman, he gave orders to have the injured woman to the Quarantine Station in Kalihi.

From this it is understood that Emalia is suspected of having leprosy, and that is possibly why she was taken to the quarantine area of the sick.

(Kuokoa, 2/2/1906, p. 4)

PEPEHI I KANA WAHINE A PAA UA WAHINE LA I KA MA'I HOOKAAWALE.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLIV, Helu 5, Aoao 4. Feberuari 2, 1906.

More on Emalia Kaihumua out and about, 1901.

Sweet Emalia and Moanalua.

Their Problems Before the Court

Moanalua is a youth that we often see with a woman’s necklace all the time, and a women’s pocketbook. He is somewhat feeble-minded, and is always smiling. Moanalua is the name that people know him by, but his real name is something else.

He was arrested for stealing a suit and a pair of slacks from Keoki Woolsey’s place in Waikiki. He did not want a lawyer, and did not want to contest his guilt, and his case is left for the circuit court.

As for Sweet Emalia, she was enjoying the tasty water, swipe [suaipa], and after being filled with this intoxicating liquid, she went along with the two aikane, Kapahu and John Richard [?] on a car ride, in the evening of this past Sunday. The horse was exerted as they sped along King Street, and from the car came that song often heard from children on the streets, “There’ll be a hot time, in the old town, tonight.” This car was seen by a policeman as it sped on crazily, and he called out to stop, but the driver misheard and thought he was being told to speed up; and when the were caught, all the steam was exhausted from the horse resulting from it being run hard. Sweet Emalia and her riding companions were taken to jail [Halewai], and there she entertained the peace officers with her funny antics.

That Emalia was detained with another woman in a single room, and it wasn’t long when they began to display their skill in boxing. The rumbling of the earth was heard, and it was three large officers that separated the two women fighters.

Sweet Emalia was fined $12, and her fellow joy riders were each fined $2.00. Another suit was filed for injuring her companion, but it was dismissed.

(Kuokoa, 10/4/1901, p. 5)

O Sweet Emalia me Moanalua.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXXIX, Helu 14, Aoao 5. Okatoba 4, 1901.

Poi made from wheat flour in Kalawao and Kalaupapa, 1879.

Poi Palaoa.

O Kuokoa Newspaper; Aloha oe:—

Here in the colony of the leprosy patients in Kalawao and Kalaupapa, flour is used to make poi [poi palaoa]; it is similar to poi made of breadfruit [poi ulu] in the yellow color, and it is truly delicious; it is a lot like taro poi [poi kalo]: your stomach doesn’t get sore, and you become full indeed; we have no poi because the taro won’t arrive to these Koolau cliffs because of the terrible weather during these months.

This new poi began at Iliopii, by a Hawaiian who lived in California who was used to making it there, and that is how he spread this new poi here; and the benefits of this poi is now known, and therefore, our poi problems are over during this stormy period, and should calm weather return, the patients will get their paʻi ʻai¹ [pai kalo].

Poi palaoa is very appropriate when working because you stay full, and it is fun to make when you get used to it, and so too with rice mixed with crackers and stirred up in a pot; when it boils and is cooked, it is time for to fill the stomach, and you will be always full.

The Superintendent of the Leprosy Patients.

In my observations, our Superintendent, Mr. N. B. Emerson [Emekona], M. D. is quick with filling the storehouse [hale papaa] with flour [palaoa], rice [raiki], crackers [barena], bags of sugar [eke kopaa], and salmon [kamano]; there is nothing to complain of Kapuukolu.²

Worship. Worship always happens now: Protestants [Hoole Pope], Mormons [Moremona], and Catholics [Katolika]; their meetings on Sundays are always full; life of the patients is peaceful now, not like before when Damien [Damiano] and when W. K. Sumner were Superintendent; there were uprisings from drinking okolehao and other alcoholic drinks made of ti, sweet potato [uala], and so forth.

Bell of the Church of Kalaupapa. On the 5th of Feb., the Bell arrived on the Warwick; a very fine bell which was a gift from the Sunday School of Kaukeano and the brethren of that church; and now it hangs proudly in its honored steeple with its ringing voice in the cliff faces of Kalaupapa, and it points out the movement of the hands of the clock, and the Sunday School of Kalaupapa fully appreciates the gift of the Sunday School of Kaukeano.

S. K. K. Kanohokula.

Kalaupapa, Feb. 18, 1879.

¹Although i tend not to use ʻokina and kahakō, i marked “pai ai” here for added clarity.

²Kapuukolu is a place on Kauai, figuratively used to represent abundance of good food.

(Kuokoa, 3/15/1879, p. 2)

Ka Poi Palaoa.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XVIII, Helu 11, Aoao 2. Maraki 15, 1879.