More oopuhue tragedy, 1858.

Died Without Delay.

Kahou died quickly, a woman in Kipahulu, from eating Oopuhue, a vicious fish of the sea.

On Saturday, the 21st of August, Kahinu, the hunona [son-in-law or daughter-in-law] of that Kahou went casting [lawaia kaili] and caught two fish, one a humuhumu and the other an Oopuhue; Continue reading

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Words of advice from Kamehameha I, 1891.

BE PATIENT.

O Friends, Companions, those who go hand in hand with the Leo, who walk together on the sands of Kakuhihewa moistened by the Kukalahale rains, living from Maunalua to Moanalua. Greetings to you all.

Remember the title above, “I nui ke aho.” This is one of the touching statements said by our Land Conqueror [Na’i Aina], when one of his warriors was pierced by a barbed spear; when he saw this predicament, he grabbed and pulled the spear, and that is when the warrior cried out in pain. But that conqueror of aina responded quickly while shedding tears, “My son, be patient.” Continue reading

Hawaiians deported from Samoa, 1891.

Hawaiians From Samoa

Aboard the steamship Zealandia which landed this past Saturday, these Hawaiian friends came back from Samoa due to the deportation proclamation by King Malietoa, and their passage was paid for by funds from the Legislature which was set aside. Here are their names: Kimo Kukona and wife, Kawelu and wife, Kaolola, Kaluna, Moanalua, and Kahinu. They said that life in those islands was comfortable, and suitable for the health, but they could not stay long because of King Malietoa’s deportation order. There is much leprosy spreading there.

Hairama Kaumialii and Mose wed Samoan wives. The latter named is a sailor on the Kaimiloa who abandoned ship at Samoa. They both will return under the deportation law. Kauaua, a sailor from the Kaimiloa who fled, assimilated to the Samoan way of life, and is covered in a tattoo. These are the Hawaiians who remained and are preparing to return: Mose, Kaliko, Kauaua, Keoni, A. B. Kaaukuu, Mrs. Maria, Lui, Mrs. Akahi, Luna, Miss Kalua, Mrs. Kaulahao, Kanaauao, Kamaka, Kauaki, Meekue, and Hailama Kaumialii. As for James Keau, he is well off, living in the islands of Tonga, and is far from the authority of this expulsion order by King Malietoa.

[If some of my posts look familiar to some of you, they are being reposted from my old Hoolaupai Facebook page. They cannot be easily found on that page, and that was one of the major reasons for starting this one. Here at least i can do tags and categories, and hopefully that makes them easier to find. Google also does a pretty good job of making them searchable!]

(Kuokoa, 1/17/1891, p. 2)

NA HAWAII MAI SAMOA

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXX, Helu 3, Aoao 2. Ianuari 17, 1891.

Death of Mary Ann Kaaumokulani Kinoole Pitman Ailau, 1905.

DIED.

AILAU—In Hilo, Hawaii. February 11, 1905. Mrs. Mary Ann Kaaumokulani Kinoole Pitman Ailau, daughter of the High Chiefess Kinoole and the late Benjamin Pitman, and widow of John Keakaokalani Ailau, aged 67 years.

Mrs. Ailau was known from one end of the group to the other, and in Boston and many of the Atlantic watering places.

She was born at Hilo 67 years ago, and with the exception of a number of years spent in Boston and New England completing her education, she always resided in the islands. She was a daughter of Benjamin Pitman a capitalist, who resided both in Hilo and Honolulu. The Pitman home was at the corner of Alakea and Beretania streets, on the site now occupied by the C. Q. Yee Hop building.

The Pitmans came here from Boston, where they were well connected. Mrs. Ailau’s father-in-law also resided here for a number of years. Her father married the High Chiefess Kinoole, daughter of the High Chief Hoolulu. Continue reading

Hawaiian returns home to Hilo after living in Boston for 50 years, 1917.

RETURNED ONCE AGAIN TO THE LAND OF HIS BIRTH

In the morning of last Friday, the steamship Matsonia docked in Hilo nei, and aboard the ship was Mr. Benjamin Keolaokalani Pitman [Pittman], the brother of the recently deceased Mrs. Mary Ailau. He left left Hilo when he was 10 years old, and went back with his father to the city of Boston, and he has lived there for a full 50 years, and this is the first time he has returned to see the place where he was born.

He is a direct cousin to George Mooheau Beckley, as their mothers were sisters; Kinoole is Mr. Pitman’s mother, and Kahinu is George C. Beckley’s. The two of them were daughters of the Alii Hoolulu who hid the bones of Kamehameha Ka Na’i Aupuni. He [Pittman] went with his people on a tour to see the fire of the enchanting woman of the pit, and on their return, they were entertained at the home of Mrs. Maraea Wilipaona [? Mrs. Maria Wilfong], and Mrs. J. D. Lewis and Mrs. Wilfong put on a luau to honor this Hawaiian Alii. On this trip of his to his homeland, accompanying him were his wife and some friends from Boston. On Saturday evening, he and his wife left for Honolulu, and from their they will return to his home in Boston. He is now a Millionaire living in Boston.

[Unfortunately, the digital images of the Hoku o Hawaii newspaper are only available online from 5/31/1917, and so the issue in which this story appears is not available yet (along with the ten years of newspapers that come before it).]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 2/8/1917, p. 2)

HOEA HOU I KA AINA HANAU.

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke 11, Helu 37, Aoao 2.