Death of Mary Ann Kaaumokulani Kinoole Pitman Ailau, 1905.

DIED.

AILAU—In Hilo, Hawaii. February 11, 1905. Mrs. Mary Ann Kaaumokulani Kinoole Pitman Ailau, daughter of the High Chiefess Kinoole and the late Benjamin Pitman, and widow of John Keakaokalani Ailau, aged 67 years.

Mrs. Ailau was known from one end of the group to the other, and in Boston and many of the Atlantic watering places.

She was born at Hilo 67 years ago, and with the exception of a number of years spent in Boston and New England completing her education, she always resided in the islands. She was a daughter of Benjamin Pitman a capitalist, who resided both in Hilo and Honolulu. The Pitman home was at the corner of Alakea and Beretania streets, on the site now occupied by the C. Q. Yee Hop building.

The Pitmans came here from Boston, where they were well connected. Mrs. Ailau’s father-in-law also resided here for a number of years. Her father married the High Chiefess Kinoole, daughter of the High Chief Hoolulu. Continue reading

Emma Metcalf Nakuina affronted, 1897.

Contemptuous Act Against Women.

Being that the parading was being held in the uplands of the Kamehameha School for Boys, on the plains of Kaiwiula, Mrs. Emma Metcalf Nakuina went attended by Mrs. R. W. Maea [Mrs. Rudolph William Meyer] of Kalae, Molokai and two of her daughters, Mrs. Mutch and Mrs. Hitchcock. They went and sat in a calm and shady place at the Bishop Museum, atop a area covered with manienie grass, and the son of the one named first, F. W. Kahapula Beckley, brought them chairs. Continue reading