Fishponds seen on travels around Molokai, 1893.

[Found under: “Huakai Makaikai i ka Mokupuni o Molokainui a Hina.”]

FISHPONDS.

When I travelled from Kawela to Pukoo, it was perhaps ten or so miles, I saw 30 or more fishponds [loko ia] in the ocean, set apart by rock walls like the ponds at Kualoa, Koolau, Oahu. Some of the ponds I saw were almost a mile long. They [the walls] were five feet tall and four feet wide. Continue reading

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Irene Haalou Kahalelaukoa Ii purchases Hanaloa fishpond at auction, 1879.

ANNOUNCEMENT.

Accrued to Irene Haalou Kahalelaukoa Ii is the fishpond of “Hanaloa” and the associated lands at Waipio, Ewa; and that area is restricted, and Sam. Kiaha is the caretaker. A. F. Judd, Guardian of Irene.

Honolulu, Sept. 9, 1878.

(Kuokoa, 4/26/1879, p. 3)

kuokoa_4_26_1879_3

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XVIII, Helu 17, Aoao 3. Aperila 26, 1879.

Huge octopus caught by Anina, 1908.

HUGE OCTOPUS CAUGHT AND BROUGHT TO LAND.

On Thursday afternoon at the pier on the makai end of Allen Street, a large octopus was caught on hook by a part-Chinese boy named Anina.

While he was fishing enjoyably, he felt the pull of something and he thought it was an ulua. It pulled at his line for a long time, and because he could not pull it up, he called some people to come and help him for he was very worried that he would be pulled under. He had no concern about the line because he was using very heavy line with a hook that would not break.

When several people arrived, he was helped at pulling it up to land. Continue reading

Fishpond and fish and the court, 1915.

Court Holds Fish Don’t Go With Pond

Famous Molokai Fish Pond Case Passed on by Supreme Court—Decision Raises New Questions.

What’s fish pasture worth?

This is a question which Attorney Dan Case is trying to have answered, because on behalf of a client he will probably soon be putting in a bill against Attorney Eugene Murphy for a goodly sum for the care of Murphy’s finny property in a certain pond on Molokai. It is the famous fish pond case again.

The question has been brought up through a supreme court decision, rendered this week, in which the court apparently holds that when a man sells a fish pond he doesn’t necessarily sell the fish that may be in it. About six months ago a Japanese named Kanayama bought at sheriff’s sale the lease on the fish pond in question, only to be sued a little later for damages because he had taken fish from the pond. The suit was filed by Murphy, attorney for Akutogawa [Akutagawa], the Japanese who previously owned the lease, and who had given his attorney a bill of sale on the fish in the pond.

In the district magistrate’s court, judgement was rendered against Murphy, but on his appeal to the supreme court, this is reversed. The syllabus of the opinion of the higher court read:—”The judgement is reversed and the cause remanded to the district magistrate of Molokai with instructions to enter judgement in favor of the plaintiff for the sum of $75 and costs.”

The question is now what Murphy purposes doing to get his fish, which presumably are trespassing in the pond, and also what bill for pasture the owner of the pond can collect for caring for them all this time. And the end is not yet.

(Maui News, 7/24/1915, p. 6)

Court Holds Fish Don't Go With Pond

The Maui News, Volume XXII, Number 22, Page 6. July 24, 1915.

Wailuku and Lahaina get new marketplace, 1880.

Wailuku will soon have a market-place, and so will Lahaina. Each town has $2,000 appropriated for the purpose. His Excellency Governor Dominis gives his attention to the erection of these useful structures. The fish-market of Lahaina is sometimes more varied and abundant than that of Honolulu. The mullet ponds of Molokai furnish inexhaustible supplies of fish; and the coast and bays of Lanai could supply a great city with crawfish, crustacea, and bivalves of various kinds, and with turtle in exceptional quantities. We have noticed the terrapin brought to Lahaina. The Makawao district will supply the Wailuku market with an abundance of choice beef and mutton. The large and commodious markets at both towns will, no doubt, contribute to the increase and greater variety of supplies.

[Wow, this article has so much varied information: on government spending, fish supply, fish ponds, ranching, &c., &c., &c.]

(Wednesday Express, 9/8/1880, p. 1)

Wailuku will soon have a market-place...

The Wednesday Express, Volume I, Number 1, Page 1. September 8, 1880.

Storied places of Kiholo and Luahine Wai, 1923.

THE PLEASURES OF TIME

Luahine Wai

It is a big pool close to Kiholo and Laemano. It is a famed bathing spot for the alii of old. Its waters are numbing, and it is said that one cannot swim its circumference because it is cold like ice water.

It is said that within this pond is a hole where you enter into a hidden cave where the bones of the old chiefs are laid. It is said that Kamehameha’s bones are there as well. As for the truth of it all, it is not certain, until some living person enters this hidden cave; then there will be a witness to verify what is in this cave.

This pond is about 5 fathoms deep at its deepest, which is at its center, where it is very cold. And if you dive to the bottom, you will soon feel your body grow cold, and you won’t be able to stay there long. You will shoot up and swim for the edge.

A person that dives down to that deep area will turn red, like the red of coral [? puko’a] Continue reading