Mele for the Claudine, the vessel that carried the commission of annexationists to Washington DC, 1893.

KELAUDINA SONG.

Kaulana mai nei Kelaudina
Ahailono o ka poe pakaha
Nau i lawe aku na komisina
O ke aupuni kuloko o Hawaii
Hopuhopualulu e ka hele’na
A na elele o ua aupuni nei
E ake ana e hookoia
Ka iini pakaha aina
Halawai aku nei lakou
Me kahi paele a Kalivilana Continue reading

The call to protest in English, 1894.

A SOLEMN PROTEST.

The People of Hawaii protest against the New Constitution and Mr. Dole’s Republic.

This afternoon at five o’clock the loyal citizens of Hawaii will meet on Palace Square, and enter a solemn and earnest protest against the infamous outrage, which it is proposed to perpetuate on Wednesday—the proclaiming of a republic of filibusters, the proclamation of a constitution framed by aliens and for the sole benefit of certain classes.

The temporary power invested in the provisional government was obtained through a most contemptible conspiracy, and through underhanded tricks. The revolt of January 1893 was not the outcome of a spontaneous outburst of the popular will. It was the most contemptible act on record in history. The hired brigand John L. Stevens used his brief authority to further this scheme. The country which he represented disavowed his actions and thought that the honor of the United States was saved by dismissing him, and in six lines in a message to congress rebuking him.

The world thinks differently, and there are no reasons to believe hat President Cleveland will allow himself, and his administration to be covered with infamy by leaving an admitted wrong unrepaired.

In this, the fin de siecle, the bloody ravage of war and revolution is out of fashion and arbitration has taken the place of force. But, it is necessary to show to the world that the Hawaiian People are not participating in the revolutionary movement of the oath-breaking ex-Judge, who now maskerades as a president of a republic. The People of Hawaii believe in self-government and, by the Heavens they will have it. The people shall rule. The will of the people shall be the force which makes the government.

When, this afternoon, Hawaiians and foreigners be the Anglo-Saxons, Portuguese or Chinese, stand sholder to shoulder and listen to J. O. Carter, Hawaii’s best citizen, reading the protest of Hawaii against the usurpers the loyal men they can rest assured that their protest will be heard and echoed all over the civilized world, and that the unrelenting and solid opposition to the junta, now calling themselves a republic, will be supported and admired by every power that knows the existence of these fair isles. Let therefore every man, woman and child of every race, nationality and birth be present on Palace Square, and by their presence testify to the true desire of the people of Hawaii, and quietly, orderly and peacefully prove to the world that the new government is unpopular, detested, and created against the will of the Hawaiian nation.

(Hawaii Holomua, 7/2/1894, p. 2)

A SOLEMN PROTEST.

Hawaii Holomua, Volume III, Number 153, Page 2. July 2, 1894.

Stopping by at Washington, D. C. on the way to see the Queen, 1887.

KING KALAKAUA’S WIFE.

QUEEN KAPIOLANI ARRIVES AT OUR NATIONAL CAPITAL.

Arrangements Made for the Queen to Call on the President and Mrs. Cleveland—A Benevolent Creature on Her Way to Visit Victoria—Queen Emma.

QUEEN KAPIOLANI.

Washington, May 4.—Queen Kapiolani, of the Hawaiian Islands, who arrived in San Francisco on April 20, arrived in Washington to-day and immediately went to the Arlington Hotel. Arrangements have been made for the queen to call on the president and Mrs. Cleveland at noon on Wednesday. The queen and suite will arrive here early Tuesday evening and go at once to the Arlington. A time will be appointed by the queen during her stay here for the diplomatic corps to call on her, and she will also probably receive calls from the naval officers who have been stationed at Honolulu, all of whom have met her majesty, and many of whom have danced with her.

After spending a few days here sight-seeing she will go to New York. From there she goes to England to be present at the Queen’s jubilee. She has never been out of her own country before, and is quite anxious to see the “greatest woman on the face of the earth,” as she calls Queen Victoria. Queen Kapiolani is not of what is known as royal blood in Honolulu. Strictly speaking neither is King Kalakaua of royal blood, as he was elected to the throne and did not inherit it. Continue reading

A mele for Grover Cleveland, 1894.

KA HOOLA O KA KAHUI [sic] HAWAII

He ohohia nui loa
Nou e Kalivalana
Peresidena oikelakela
Kaulana me ke kiekie
O ka puuwai hao kila
O ka naauao lua ole
Pookela oe o ka nani
O ka manao akea
No ka ninau lahui
O ka Pae Aina Hawaii
Kau olelo hooholo
E hoi o Liliuokalani
Ma Kona Noho Kalaunu
O ke Aupuni Moi
Mai a Kamehameha mai
Piha olioli na moku
Ia oe e Kalivalana
Hauoli na puuwai
O ka Lahui Hawaii
I ke aloha kamahao
O Amerika Huiia
Lohea he leo aloha
Mai Wasinetona mai
Lanakila oikelakela
Ka Aoao Demokarata
Haneri a oi aku
Na kakoo o Hawaii
Puhi i na Pi Gi
Na hoohui aina
Ua haule na ikaika
A ka poe lehelehe wale
E ka Lahui Hawaii
E i ae hoi ka Hoola
Ke kuokoa mau loa
No Hawaii Aina
Lahui me ka Moi
E o e Kalivalana
I kou inoa hiwahiwa
“Ka Wiwo ole o na Wiwo ole
Ka makuakane o Hawaii
Ka Puuhonua o ka Pakipika
E noho ana i ka puuwai
O ka Lahui Hawaii.”

W. L. Kaleiakalahui.

[THE SAVIOR OF THE HAWAIIAN PEOPLE

There is great delight
For you O Cleveland
The greatest President
Famous and exalted
With heart of steel
An intelligence second to none
You are in the heights of splendor
With open mind
On the question of the people
Of the Hawaiian Archipelago
Your decision
To return Liliuokalani
To Her Throne
Of the Monarchy
From Kamehameha
The islands are filled with joy
For you O Cleveland
Hearts are happy
Of the Hawaiian People
With wonderful love
Of the United States of America
A voice of aloha has been heard
From Washington
Great Victory
The Democratic Party
Hundred or more
Were the supporters of Hawaii
Blown away were the Provisional Government
The annexationists
The powerful have fallen
The people who are all mouth
O Hawaiian Nation
The Savior says
Let there be never-ending independence
For the Land of Hawaii
The People and the Sovereign
Answer O Cleveland
Your precious name song
“The Fearless one amongst Fearless ones
The father of Hawaii
The Refuge of the Pacific
Living in the hearts
Of the Hawaiian People.”

W. L. Kaleiakalahui.

The attitude of the Hawaiian nation towards Grover Cleveland on the most part was and is (as seen recently) much different than towards his successor, William McKinley.]

(Nupepa Aloha Aina, 3/17/1894, p. 3)

KA HOOLA O KA KAHUI HAWAII

Nupepa Aloha Aina, Buke I, Helu 11, Aoao 3. Maraki 17, 1894.

More on the missionaries, 1894.

Missionary Descendants Show Their Knowledge of Hula Ku’i.

In the Advertiser of 2/7/1894, was shown that at New Haven, United States of America, on the past 17th of January 1894, there was held a party to commemorate the anniversary of the government by the P. G. Those present were: J. R. Kauka [James Robert Judd?], G. S. Walakahauki [George S. Waterhouse], C. M. Kuke [C. Montague Cooke, Jr.?], W. D. Balauina [William D. Baldwin], A. M. Atherton, A. S. Knudsen, J. A. Waila [James Austin Wilder], H. A. Balauina [Harry A. Baldwin], and F. Hastings.

Before drinking to the delight at the Cabinet of Ministers of Cleveland, the young missionaries danced a hula ku’i to a hapa haole song. When the music started, the youths among them who knew how to hula ku’i jumped up immediately and danced and started to sway! …the mixed poi of Poniuailana goes the limit; there you go!—answer the call!—…¹

KE MELE HULA-KUI.

Kaulana mai nei o Mr. Cleveland,
Anti-Annexation no ia ia,
Ua olelo Cleveland i Mr. Willis,
E hele ana oe e Honolulu,
Aia hiki ana oe malaila,
E kipaku oe i ka P. G.
A komo oe Liliuokalani,
Maluna o kona throne!”
Ua hai mai Peresidena Dole,
E noho oe Malie”
Pilikia loa no Alapaki Willis,
E hoka no o Mr. Cleveland.

A MELE HULA KU’I

Famed is Mr. Cleveland,
An Anti-Annexationist is he,
Cleveland said to Mr. Willis,
[“]You are going to Honolulu,
When you get there,
Banish the P. G.
And place Liliuokalani,
Upon her throne!”
President Dole spoke,
[“]You just sit still.”
Albert Willis is perplexed,
Mr. Cleveland is thwarted.

The adeptness at the hula ku’i by these missionary descendants was seen first hand here in Honolulu, along with the girls carrying ukulele.

There you go! Mixed up is the cultivated taro with the wild! The white is smeared; the black gets the score.

What is this S. E. Bishop!—Look to New Haven! Your people’s hula ku’i dancer descendants were  gyrating away!

You missionaries, don’t be hypocritical.

¹…kuupau na ai hoowali o Poniuailana; o—ia!—e, o!—…

[Does anyone have more information on the “Kuupau na ai hoowali o Poniuailana” phrase?]

(Nupepa Ka Oiaio, 2/9/1894, p. 3)

Hoike na Mamo Mikanele i ko lakou ike hula-kui.

Nupepa Ka Oiaio, Buke VI, Helu 6, Aoao 3. Feberuari 9, 1894.

C. C. Moreno on missionaries, 1893.

A Misunderstood People.

MORENO ON THE MISSIONARIES.

Editor Post: For several years your public-spirited paper has published correspondence and statements submitted by me about Hawaii in which was foreshadowed the present state of affairs. The revolution which has just taken place is the inevitable result of missionary rule; the long-standing and deep-rooted cause of the unrest.

The missionaries in Hawaii, as in China, Japan, and elsewhere, consider that country as their open hunting grounds, regardless of the rights, customs, wishes, and priviliges of the natives and of stipulations.

I positively know that the self-appointed four chiefs of the Provisional Government in the Hawaiian Islands and the five commissioners coming to Washington to negotiate a treaty of annexation are, without a single exception, missionariesʻ confederates. Not a single native Hawaiian is with them, therefore, they cannot be considered as the representatives of the Hawaiian nation, of which they are aliens and enemies, but only as the emissaries of one side (or of a higher), which is not the right side.

The truth about Hawaiian affairs has never reached the State Department and that is the reason why, in the department, the knife has always been taken by the blade instead of by the handle in dealing with the Hawaiian question.

The United States always sent third rate politicians as ministers and consult to Honolulu, hence the erroneous information about Hawaii. I have on the spot studied Hawaii and the Hawaiians, their troubles with the missionaries of all creeds, and when distant from the islands I have kept an uninterrupted correspondence with the leaders of the Hawaiian nation, such as the Hons. Wilcox, Bush, Testa, Kaai, Kapena, Kaunamano, Kimo Pelekane [James I. Dowsett], and others.

My views on the Hawaiian question I explained at length to President Hayes and Secretary of State Evarts, to President Cleveland and to Assistant Secretary of State Porter: later, to Senator Morgan and to Congressman McCreary, and these are the statesmen that ought to dispose of the Hawaiian question and render justice to the weak, ill-treated, honest, and generous Hawaiian people that have been continually misrepresented, misjudged, and grossly wronged.

In accordance with the good order of things the coming self-appointed and self-styled Hawaiian commissioners, with more appearance than substance, should not be received by the United States authorities, because their self-attributed mission to Washington is based only upon selfish and malignant motives.

This will be a good opportunity for the great people of the United States to show their sentiment for fair play and generosity toward the unfortunate, harmless, friendly, and oppressed Hawaiian people, worthy of sympathy and of help in this their hour of national distress.

Celco Cæsar Moreno.

(Liberal, 2/25/1893, p. 2)

A Misunderstood People.

The Liberal, Volume I, Number 48, Page 2. February 25, 1893.

Letter from Iosepa, Utah, 1913.

A VOICE FROM UTAH.

Iosepa, Toole County. Dec. 19, 1912.

Solomon Hanohano, Editor of the Kuokoa, Aloha oe:—Because I want to know the news of the land of our birth, the desire to get a subscription to the Kuokoa grew. Being the the new year is coming, it would be a means for me to see the news of our home and the progress of the political scene or its regression, as well as the victories or discouragements of our fellow makaainana.

Not because Iosepa lacks newspaper subscribers, but for me to get a personal one.

This is one of the important years regarding the nation, being that the leadership of the power of the nation went to the Democrats; the big question is just this: Will the poor makaainana really benefit, or will they be left unstable once again like during the presidency of Cleveland, but it is only time that will tell.

If those elected could follow through on what their lips pledge to the masses, then we indeed will be blessed, however if it is like what Isaiah said, thusly: “These people come near to me with their mouth, but their hearts are far from me.” [Isaiah 29:13] Then comes those famous words of that old timer of Lahaina: “Saying, when indeed will that happen.” [“I mai hoi, ahea la ka hoi.”] The big-eyed images know that the small-eyed images are not watched. [Ikeia aku la no na kii maka nunui, nana oleia iho la na wahi kii maka liilii ??]

My aloha to the few Hawaiian makaainana left who are squeezed and assimilated [i ka opaia aku ua pili pu ?] until they are totally gone from the beloved face of Hawaii, along with the increase of the other races upon the land. And so too with the various diseases of the different races whose devastation spread to our people who lack immunity. Aloha to our people.

As for our living in this unfamiliar land, this land that true Mormons know as the chosen land, and a land to foster the believers in that one faith, all of the Hawaiians are in good health as well as the Samoans, from the old to the young.

I have faith that Iosepa will become a place where Hawaiians will multiply once again, and that these valleys will become full of true Hawaiians and Samoans, when the children are born, and grow up, and marry and give birth.

Some proof of this belief is the great desire of the president of the Mormons for the youths to marry of their own race so that this land is full of Hawaiians. For according to him, it is here that the people of the islands of the ocean will spread.

The town of Iosepa is growing. The church is building homes for the people without homes, lest they live in disarray as the Hawaiians before, with two or three families in a single dwelling.

The workers are paid a dollar every Saturday. The children are taught in the school here in Iosepa. Two children graduated from the local school of Iosepa, and are attending high school, they are Joseph H. Bird and William Pukahi, both are true Hawaiians.

I have been just chosen as judge, and George K. Hubbell as sheriff of the district. We are both Republicans, which also are the majority of the Hawaiians here.

Perhaps this will do.

Charles J. Broad.

Iosepa, Toole County, Utah.

(Kuokoa, 1/10/1913, p. 6)

HE LEO MAI UTAH MAI.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLIX, Helu 2, Aoao 6. Ianuari 10, 1913.