Letter from Iosepa, Utah, 1913.

A VOICE FROM UTAH.

Iosepa, Toole County. Dec. 19, 1912.

Solomon Hanohano, Editor of the Kuokoa, Aloha oe:—Because I want to know the news of the land of our birth, the desire to get a subscription to the Kuokoa grew. Being the the new year is coming, it would be a means for me to see the news of our home and the progress of the political scene or its regression, as well as the victories or discouragements of our fellow makaainana.

Not because Iosepa lacks newspaper subscribers, but for me to get a personal one.

This is one of the important years regarding the nation, being that the leadership of the power of the nation went to the Democrats; the big question is just this: Will the poor makaainana really benefit, or will they be left unstable once again like during the presidency of Cleveland, but it is only time that will tell.

If those elected could follow through on what their lips pledge to the masses, then we indeed will be blessed, however if it is like what Isaiah said, thusly: “These people come near to me with their mouth, but their hearts are far from me.” [Isaiah 29:13] Then comes those famous words of that old timer of Lahaina: “Saying, when indeed will that happen.” [“I mai hoi, ahea la ka hoi.”] The big-eyed images know that the small-eyed images are not watched. [Ikeia aku la no na kii maka nunui, nana oleia iho la na wahi kii maka liilii ??]

My aloha to the few Hawaiian makaainana left who are squeezed and assimilated [i ka opaia aku ua pili pu ?] until they are totally gone from the beloved face of Hawaii, along with the increase of the other races upon the land. And so too with the various diseases of the different races whose devastation spread to our people who lack immunity. Aloha to our people.

As for our living in this unfamiliar land, this land that true Mormons know as the chosen land, and a land to foster the believers in that one faith, all of the Hawaiians are in good health as well as the Samoans, from the old to the young.

I have faith that Iosepa will become a place where Hawaiians will multiply once again, and that these valleys will become full of true Hawaiians and Samoans, when the children are born, and grow up, and marry and give birth.

Some proof of this belief is the great desire of the president of the Mormons for the youths to marry of their own race so that this land is full of Hawaiians. For according to him, it is here that the people of the islands of the ocean will spread.

The town of Iosepa is growing. The church is building homes for the people without homes, lest they live in disarray as the Hawaiians before, with two or three families in a single dwelling.

The workers are paid a dollar every Saturday. The children are taught in the school here in Iosepa. Two children graduated from the local school of Iosepa, and are attending high school, they are Joseph H. Bird and William Pukahi, both are true Hawaiians.

I have been just chosen as judge, and George K. Hubbell as sheriff of the district. We are both Republicans, which also are the majority of the Hawaiians here.

Perhaps this will do.

Charles J. Broad.

Iosepa, Toole County, Utah.

(Kuokoa, 1/10/1913, p. 6)

HE LEO MAI UTAH MAI.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLIX, Helu 2, Aoao 6. Ianuari 10, 1913.

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Kahoohihi Alapa Dies at Iosepa, Utah, 1913.

MRS. KAHOOHIHI ALAPA HAS GONE.

Mr. Editor:—Please allow me some space for the sentence above, that being that Mrs. Kahoohihi Alapa has grown weary of this life.

On the morning of Monday, at 6 o’clock on the 3rd of March, the Angel of God visited and took the soul from the body of our beloved Mrs. Kahoohihi Alapa. Auwe aloha wale!

She left her her feeble husband and their children and family. They have four daughters from their loins, and she left this life.

She was sick along with her husband for a week, she had lower back pains, and she was also pregnant, she was distressed along with being inflicted by smallpox [hepera], which is a sickness that is quarantined, so no one would enter to help them; they would have been in terrible trouble were it not for that male cousin of Kahoohihi’s [kaikunane hanauna ?], that being Joseph N. Kaniwi, who stayed with them and so they had someone to take care of them. He was up day and night patiently.

Kahoohihi Alapa was born of the loins of Julia (f) and David Luwela (m) in the month of March, on the 23rd, 1866; at Kahana, Koolauloa, Oahu; and she was 26 years and over 11 months of age when she expired.

She left her homeland, and followed after her grandfather, Makekehau [Makakehau ?], leaving her father and mother and family at home. She was only eleven at the time.

She lived here at Iosepa for 15 years and some, and she was bound by the sacred covenant of marriage with her husband, Harvey O. Alapa, and she left this life.

She was pleasant in every way, she was welcoming to all to her home, and she was important to her friends, and she listened to her friends when they spoke and would do their bidding.

How regrettable, that rose blossom is gone; she will no longer be seen passing at the door of the family and friends of the land. How sad!

Me, with sadness, her sister-in-law,

MRS. ANA OLIWA HOOPIIAINA.

Iosepa, Tooele County, Utah.

[Here is an interesting site with what seems to be all kinds of Iosepa related information from the Native Hawaiian Genealogy Society.

(Kuokoa, 3/28/1913, p. 7)

MRS. KAHOOHIHI ALAPA UA HALA.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LI, Helu 12, Aoao 7. Maraki 28, 1913.