Republican candidates for Maui, 1904.

REPUBLICAN TICKET ON MAUI ISLE

HON. PHILIP PALI OF LAHAINA.

MOSES K. NAKUINA OF MOLOKAI.

W. J. COELHO OF WAILUKU.

GEORGE COPP.

A. N. HAYSELDEN, NOMINEE FOR SENATOR.

HON. W. P. HAIA OF HANA.

JOHN KALINO OF HAMAKUAPOKO.

(Hawaiian Gazette, 9/23/1904, p. 5)

REPUBLICAN TICKET ON MAUI ISLE

Hawaiian Gazette, Volume XXXIX, Number 77, Page 5. September 23, 1904.

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Jonah Kuhio Kalanianaole, 1902.

THE DELIVERER OF THE HAWAIIANS.

PRINCE KALANIANAOLE.

THE PICTURE ABOVE IS OF THE PRINCE KUHIO KALANIANAOLE, THE NEPHEW OF QUEEN LILIUOKALANI; HE IS THE REPUBLICAN CANDIDATE FOR THE REPRESENTATIVE TO WASHINGTON RUNNING THIS SEASON.

BEFORE HE AGREED TO JOIN THE REPUBLICAN PARTY, HE WENT FIRST TO HIS ROYAL AUNTY, THE QUEEN, AND EXPLAINED TO HER ALL OF HIS THOUGHTS, AND ASKED FOR HER THOUGHTS.

(Kuokoa, 10/24/1902, p. 1)

KA HOOPAKELE O KA LAHUI HAWAII.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XL, Helu 43, Aoao 1. Okatoba 24, 1902.

On Statehood, Republicans, Elepaio, and Voting Rights,1912.

STATEHOOD AND THE ELEPAIO

It has been many years during which the Republican party has held power in the governing of the Territory of Hawaii, and Hawaii has not at all been made into a state, where we’d be able to vote for our own governor, our chief justices, circuit court judges, Senators, and representatives in our legislature, and other many heads of government. However, the cry of those Republicans in their workplace to make Hawaii a State, does not cease.  It is ten years that Kuhio has been in the Legislature in Washington, and he has not put a bit of effort into making Hawaii a state. The Republicans are like the Elepaio bird who crying goes, “Ono ka ia! Ono ka ia! [I crave fish! I crave fish!]” This bird just cries out, but does not venture to the sea to catch fish. But its cry atop logs is what makes canoes bug ridden [pu-ha]. Ten years of crying “Mokuaina no Hawaii! Mokuaina no Hawaii! Mokuaina no Hawaii! [Statehood for Hawaii! Statehood for Hawaii! Statehood for Hawaii!]” But there has been no statehood at all; one session of the legislature passes by and the next comes, and then passes by, and so forth. But the Elepaio (Republican) continues to cry, “Ono ka ia! (I Mokuaina no Hawaii.) Ono ka ia! (I Mokuaina no Hawaii.) Yet they do nothing so that Hawaii would attain statehood.

(Aloha Aina, 10/26/1912, p. 2)

KA MOKUAINA AME KA ELEPAIO

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke XVII, Helu 43, Aoao 2. Okatoba 26, 1912.

Candidates, 1903.

Republican Candidates of the Counties of Maui and Kauai

L. M. BALDWIN, Chief Sheriff of Maui County.

NOAH A. ALULI, Lawyer of Maui County.

W. A. McKAY, Candidate for Auditor of Maui County.

F. WITTROCK, Candidate for Treasurer of Maui County.

A. N. HASELDEN, Candidate for Supervisor of Maui County.

W. H. King, Candidate for Supervisor of Maui County.

W. H. RICE, Supervisor for Kauai County.

J. K. IOSEPA, Supervisor for Maui County.

GEORGE FAIRCHILD, Candidate for Supervisor of Kauai County.

CHARLEY A. RICE, Tax Assessor and Collector of Kauai County.

G. W. MAHIKOA, Supervisor of Kauai County.

J. B. HANAIKE, Surveyor of Kauai County.

(Kuokoa, 10/23/1903, p. 1)

He Mau Moho Repubalika o na Kalana o Maui me Kauai

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLI, Helu 43, Aoao 1. Okatoba 23, 1903.

Letter from Iosepa, Utah, 1913.

A VOICE FROM UTAH.

Iosepa, Toole County. Dec. 19, 1912.

Solomon Hanohano, Editor of the Kuokoa, Aloha oe:—Because I want to know the news of the land of our birth, the desire to get a subscription to the Kuokoa grew. Being the the new year is coming, it would be a means for me to see the news of our home and the progress of the political scene or its regression, as well as the victories or discouragements of our fellow makaainana.

Not because Iosepa lacks newspaper subscribers, but for me to get a personal one.

This is one of the important years regarding the nation, being that the leadership of the power of the nation went to the Democrats; the big question is just this: Will the poor makaainana really benefit, or will they be left unstable once again like during the presidency of Cleveland, but it is only time that will tell.

If those elected could follow through on what their lips pledge to the masses, then we indeed will be blessed, however if it is like what Isaiah said, thusly: “These people come near to me with their mouth, but their hearts are far from me.” [Isaiah 29:13] Then comes those famous words of that old timer of Lahaina: “Saying, when indeed will that happen.” [“I mai hoi, ahea la ka hoi.”] The big-eyed images know that the small-eyed images are not watched. [Ikeia aku la no na kii maka nunui, nana oleia iho la na wahi kii maka liilii ??]

My aloha to the few Hawaiian makaainana left who are squeezed and assimilated [i ka opaia aku ua pili pu ?] until they are totally gone from the beloved face of Hawaii, along with the increase of the other races upon the land. And so too with the various diseases of the different races whose devastation spread to our people who lack immunity. Aloha to our people.

As for our living in this unfamiliar land, this land that true Mormons know as the chosen land, and a land to foster the believers in that one faith, all of the Hawaiians are in good health as well as the Samoans, from the old to the young.

I have faith that Iosepa will become a place where Hawaiians will multiply once again, and that these valleys will become full of true Hawaiians and Samoans, when the children are born, and grow up, and marry and give birth.

Some proof of this belief is the great desire of the president of the Mormons for the youths to marry of their own race so that this land is full of Hawaiians. For according to him, it is here that the people of the islands of the ocean will spread.

The town of Iosepa is growing. The church is building homes for the people without homes, lest they live in disarray as the Hawaiians before, with two or three families in a single dwelling.

The workers are paid a dollar every Saturday. The children are taught in the school here in Iosepa. Two children graduated from the local school of Iosepa, and are attending high school, they are Joseph H. Bird and William Pukahi, both are true Hawaiians.

I have been just chosen as judge, and George K. Hubbell as sheriff of the district. We are both Republicans, which also are the majority of the Hawaiians here.

Perhaps this will do.

Charles J. Broad.

Iosepa, Toole County, Utah.

(Kuokoa, 1/10/1913, p. 6)

HE LEO MAI UTAH MAI.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLIX, Helu 2, Aoao 6. Ianuari 10, 1913.

The magazine “Ke Au Hou.” 1912.

[Found under, “Local News”]

We have heard that the Book, “Ke Au Hou,” will be taken over by some Republicans and its name will change to “Ka Holomua.” Perhaps that is just gossip here in Honolulu: groaning this way and that.

[See Papakilo Database for online issues: “Ke Au Hou” and “Hawaii Holomua”. I am not sure what changes were made with the name change, but the heads of the paper seem to stay the same: John H. Wise, Gulstan K. Poepoe, and Daniel K. Hoolapa…

These publications are more like literary magazines than newspapers. There are many more extant issues of “Hawaii Holomua” neither microfilmed nor available online to this day!]

(Kuokoa Home Rula, 2/16/1912, p. 2)

Ua lohe mai makou...

Kuokoa Home Rula, Buke X, Helu 7, Aoao 2. Feberuari 16, 1912.